Spacing Toronto: Why I revived the Bureau of Municipal Research

Spacing Toronto: Why I revived the Bureau of Municipal Research. “Ten years ago, as a grad student researching the history of Toronto’s waterfront, I came across a study, published in 1977, that could very well have been written today: ‘Should the Island be an Airport?’ The report, I came to learn, was produced by a long-lived, but largely forgotten, citizens group known as the Bureau of Municipal Research. The Bureau was established in 1914, as the Toronto Daily Star reported at the time, as a centre of “general municipal intelligence.” Its mission and motto was to produce “better government through research,” and for seventy years that’s what it did, publishing over 800 research bulletins and reports on more than a hundred different topics, before closing its doors in 1983.”

#TrackingTransMountain: A database of how Indigenous communities are affected by Kinder Morgan’s pipeline proposal (APTN)

APTN: #TrackingTransMountain: A database of how Indigenous communities are affected by Kinder Morgan’s pipeline proposal. “Reporters across Canada are documenting a range of Indigenous voices that express support, concern and everything in between. These stories sometimes conflict, adding noise to a confusing but important part of the Trans Mountain story and leaving room for industry, anti-pipeline activists, and others to make competing claims to support their position. #TrackingTransMountain aims to present a more clear picture of the state of consultation across all of the communities affected. Building from the hundreds of pages of official documents, existing reporting and interviews with leaders and community members themselves, The Discourse, Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) and HuffPost Canada hope to offer information to help inform discussions about what’s happening.”

Times Colonist: New tools to dig digitally into Island papers’ past

Times Colonist: New tools to dig digitally into Island papers’ past. “Historians and genealogists interested in people and communities north of Vancouver Island’s Malahat summit are gaining two new tools from Vancouver Island University. VIU Library and Special Collections is embarking on a project to reproduce in digital format early editions of the Nanaimo Daily Free Press (1874-1928) and the Cowichan Leader (1905-1928).”

Global News: N.B. provincial archives offering to restore photos, documents damaged by flooding

Global News: N.B. provincial archives offering to restore photos, documents damaged by flooding. “The Provincial Archives in New Brunswick is offering to help residents restore or copy heirloom photos and documents damaged by recent flooding. The province says repairs of single documents will be done free of charge. Larger document recovery projects will be given quotes on a case-by-case basis.”

University of Guelph: U of G’s Genetic Archive Now Open to World

University of Guelph: U of G’s Genetic Archive Now Open to World. “One of the planet’s largest collections of DNA samples – a genetic Noah’s ark held at the University of Guelph representing Canadian creatures from mites to whales — will be made available starting today to researchers worldwide under an international biodiversity project. Throwing open the doors to a massive genetic archive at U of G’s Centre for Biodiversity Genomics (CBG) will provide online access to sample information for universities, government agencies and industry that may help researchers pursue projects ranging from human health to biodiversity, said Jeremy deWaard, the centre’s associate director of collections.”

The Globe and Mail: Jim Balsillie urges MPs to regulate ‘surveillance capitalism’ of Facebook and Google

The Globe and Mail: Jim Balsillie urges MPs to regulate ‘surveillance capitalism’ of Facebook and Google. “A group representing Canada’s tech CEOs told MPs that Facebook and Google represent a new form of ‘surveillance capitalism’ and called for European-style regulation over the U.S.-based web giants. Jim Balsillie, chair of the Council of Canadian Innovators, told MPs that immediate government action is required to protect Canada’s commercial interests and the privacy of individuals.”

Financial Post: Finally, a free open-source database for all Canadian startup information

Financial Post: Finally, a free open-source database for all Canadian startup information. “Hockeystick’s open database won’t include the private financial information the company’s clients currently pay for. But it already includes basic data – company name, industry, principals and funding sources – on 7,000 startups, as well as listings for 157 VC firms, 44 angel groups, 200 accelerators and 600 government programs. Hockeystick founder and CEO Raymond Luk hopes the database will help founders locate support programs and angels in their own cities, while giving investors more accurate information on promising companies.”