CBC: Twitter trolls stoked debates about immigrants and pipelines in Canada, data show

CBC: Twitter trolls stoked debates about immigrants and pipelines in Canada, data show. “Twitter trolls linked to suspected foreign influence campaigns stoked controversy over pipelines and immigration in Canada, according to a CBC/Radio-Canada analysis of 9.6 million tweets from accounts since deleted. Roughly 21,600 tweets from those troll accounts directly targeted Canadians — many of them with messages critical of Canadian pipeline projects and tweets that highlighted divisions over Canada’s policies on immigration and refugees.”

Windsor Star (Canada): Social media sites like Facebook take in lion’s share of federal ad dollars

Windsor Star (Canada): Social media sites like Facebook take in lion’s share of federal ad dollars. “Of the $39.2 million spent on government advertisements last year, federal departments spent almost $18.2 million on digital ads — roughly 46 per cent of the total budget, which doesn’t include production costs. And, for the first time ever, social media ads made up the biggest slice of digital spending — 43 per cent, or roughly $7.8 million.” Please note this is Canada, not the United States.

CBC: Immigration Minister Hussen impersonated in refugee scam

CBC: Immigration Minister Hussen impersonated in refugee scam. “A brash new scam on social media hijacked the identity of Canada’s immigration minister to defraud desperate refugees of thousands of dollars. The fake Facebook profile of Ahmed Hussen spelled his last name with one ‘s’ but used the same photos the minister has on his official Facebook page. The account’s information was written in Arabic and English.”

INSIDER: Asylum-seekers fleeing the US for Canada are figuring out how to do it by watching YouTube videos and scanning social media

INSIDER: Asylum-seekers fleeing the US for Canada are figuring out how to do it by watching YouTube videos and scanning social media. “Reinel Alfonso stepped out of the taxi and took in his surroundings. The dead-end road, lined with signs warning him to ‘Stop’ before entering an ‘illegal border crossing,’ looked exactly as it had in the videos he’d seen on the internet. Alfonso told INSIDER he flew to the United States from Bogota, Colombia, nearly 3,000 miles away. He was here in rural, upstate New York, just feet from the Canadian border, to try to save his own life.”

National Post: How Facebook plans to stop a disinformation campaign from spreading during Canada’s upcoming federal election

National Post: How Facebook plans to stop a disinformation campaign from spreading during Canada’s upcoming federal election. “Facebook says it has learned from mistakes made during the 2016 U.S. election and it’s committed to preventing a similar disinformation campaign from spreading during Canada’s upcoming federal election. Kevin Chan, Facebook’s head of public policy in Canada, said the company’s biggest errors came from a fundamental misconception about what kind of threats they should be looking for.”

Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies Creates Digital Archive of Its Magazine, The Cairn

The Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies has digitized its magazine, The Cairn, with archives going back to 1976. It’s available at https://www.whyte.org/the-cairn . The magazine is digital now but the archive is updated monthly with the latest digital issue. The museum describes its mission on its About page this way: “In the spirit of Peter and Catharine Whyte, the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies acquires, preserves, interprets and makes accessible the history and culture of the Rocky Mountains of Canada by inspiring and cultivating the exchange of knowledge and ideas through our collections, programs and exhibitions.”

CBC: How Omar Khadr’s name appeared in a Google search for ‘Canadian soldiers’

CBC: How Omar Khadr’s name appeared in a Google search for ‘Canadian soldiers’. “Earlier this week, Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer tweeted a screenshot of some curious Google search results. A search for the term ‘Canadian soldiers’ returned a photo of former Guantanamo Bay detainee Omar Khadr who was accused of killing a U.S. soldier in 2002.”