Cision: Canada’s Residential School Story Launches on Google Earth Voyager (PRESS RELEASE)

Cision: Canada’s Residential School Story Launches on Google Earth Voyager (PRESS RELEASE). “Residential schools for First Nations, Métis and Inuit children were first established in 1831 and ran for 165 years until 1996. This system had one goal: to forcibly assimilate Canada’s Indigenous Peoples into the non-Indigenous population. Canadian Geographic Education (Can Geo Education), the first Canadian organization to produce Google Earth Voyager content, has worked closely with the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR) of the University of Manitoba to create an educational tool that will help students learn about this dark chapter in Canadian history.”

Restobiz: Sirved launches world’s first menu-based search engine (PRESS RELEASE)

Restobiz: Sirved launches world’s first menu-based search engine (PRESS RELEASE). “Sirved, the world’s first menu-based search engine, has launched its app that lets you search every menu from every restaurant — filtered by craving, dish, or dietary restrictions like gluten-free or vegetarian. The app rolled out on Dec. 5 across Canada, with some US markets already online and more coming soon. The app’s proprietary menu-search technology already indexes a database of more than 100,000 menus, from cool local spots to well-known names.”

Libraries and Archives Canada: Images of Japanese-Canadians from the Second World War now on Flickr

Libraries and Archives Canada: Images of Japanese-Canadians from the Second World War now on Flickr . “December 8, 1941—Canada invokes the War Measures Act and declares Japanese-Canadians and recent immigrants as enemy aliens to strip them of individual and property rights. Over 1,200 fishing boats owned by Japanese-Canadian fishermen are confiscated off the coast of British Columbia as a defensive measure against Japan’s war efforts on the Pacific Front.” Small collection. I had not realized that Canada also put its Japanese-descent citizens in internment camps.

Halifax Today: Saint Mary’s University historian creating Halifax Explosion database

Halifax Today: Saint Mary’s University historian creating Halifax Explosion database. “A Saint Mary’s University postdoctoral fellow is creating the Halifax Explosion database (HExD), which aims to track details of every person who died in the disaster on December 6, 1917. Dr. Claire Halstead told NEWS 95.7’s The Rick Howe Show her research started with the Halifax Explosion Remembrance Book at the Nova Scotia Archives, which gave her raw data, including names, addresses and ages, and her research is adding to that information.”

University of Calgary: Digital collection of Alberta flora launched at University of Calgary

University of Calgary: Digital collection of Alberta flora launched at University of Calgary. “Understanding global change in living systems requires knowledge of baseline biodiversity. Thanks to a collaborative project between the University of Calgary’s herbarium and Libraries and Cultural Resources (LCR), a new digital resource collection of every species in the flora of Alberta is now available to researchers and naturalists across the globe.”

Libraries and Archives Canada Puts Up Snowshoe Image Collection on Flickr

Now this is what I call a specific collection. Libraries and Archives Canada has put up a collection of snowshoe images on Flickr. That’s photos, paintings, etc. It’s less than 100 pictures but how many images of snowshoes do YOU have? From the blog post: “Traditional snowshoes are made with wooden frames and leather strips for webbing and boot bindings. Modern equivalents use metal or synthetic materials, but follow similar design characteristics to their predecessors. Early snowshoe design in North America spans the continent where regular snowfall occurs. The shapes and sizes vary dependent on the location. Snowshoes are available in round, triangular, and oval shapes, or can be very long. Each design addresses different types of snow, whether powdery, wet or icy. First Nations and Inuit communities are known for their design and use of snowshoes.”

Cooking on the cloud: New website makes Nova Scotia recipes available for free (Toronto Metro)

Toronto Metro: Cooking on the cloud: New website makes Nova Scotia recipes available for free. “As the temperature falls and more time is spent in kitchens, a new online initiative is being launched to help people easily find local tried and true recipes. On Monday, Halifax Public Libraries and Formac Publishing of Halifax officially launch the Cloud Cookbooks website. The site allows recipe seekers to access more than 3,000 recipes from 40 local cookbooks.” Over 60 different chowder recipes!