University of California, Irvine: New U.S. Carbon Monitor website compares emissions among the 50 states

University of California, Irvine News: New U.S. Carbon Monitor website compares emissions among the 50 states. “Near real-time, state-level emissions estimates are now available at the U.S. Carbon Monitor website to serve the academic community, policy makers, the news media and the general public. As a companion to launch of the public website, the team today also released an explanatory paper on the EarthArXiv preprint server.”

The Verge: The Climate Controversy Swirling Around NFTs

The Verge: The Climate Controversy Swirling Around NFTs. “Individual pieces of crypto art, non-fungible tokens (NFTs), are at least partially responsible for the millions of tons of planet-heating carbon dioxide emissions generated by the cryptocurrencies used to buy and sell them. Some artists — including those who have already benefited from the craze — think it’s a problem that can be easily solved. Others think the proposed solutions are a pipe dream.”

Fast Company: These are the world’s most sustainable fonts

Fast Company: These are the world’s most sustainable fonts. “You probably haven’t thought about whether some websites can be more sustainable than others, but in fact, web design choices can affect how much energy the site uses. In this case, the Formafantasma team made visual choices that had a direct effect on the site’s sustainability. They didn’t just choose Times New Roman and Arial because they liked them, but because they’re standard default typefaces—and therefore, the most sustainable typefaces on the web.”

Lifehacker: Figure Out Your Next Car’s Emissions and Monthly Costs with ‘Carboncounter’

Lifehacker: Figure Out Your Next Car’s Emissions and Monthly Costs with ‘Carboncounter’. “If you want to prioritize environmental friendliness with the next car you buy, a handy website called Carboncounter has done the hard work for you. With its interactive charts and graphs, you can see how more than 600 cars stack up in two key areas: greenhouse gas emissions and expected monthly charges.”

Climate change: Covid pandemic has little impact on rise in CO2 (BBC)

BBC: Climate change: Covid pandemic has little impact on rise in CO2. “The global response to the Covid-19 crisis has had little impact on the continued rise in atmospheric concentrations of CO2, says the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Carbon emissions fell dramatically in 2020 due to lockdowns that saw transport and industry grind to a halt. But this has only marginally slowed down the overall rise in concentrations, the scientists say.”

ArtNet: An Envoy of Eco-Conscious Art Dealers and Insiders Have Created a Simple Tool to Help the Industry Reduce Its Carbon Footprint

ArtNet: An Envoy of Eco-Conscious Art Dealers and Insiders Have Created a Simple Tool to Help the Industry Reduce Its Carbon Footprint. “A group of art-industry leaders has teamed up with Frieze and other organizations to create a new tool to help galleries and fair organizers reduce their carbon footprints. The Gallery Climate Coalition, as the group is known, launches its website today with a free-to-use carbon calculator that has been tailored to the needs of the commercial art sector.”

Columbia University: Columbia University Launches the World’s First ‘Carbon Dioxide Removal Law’ Database

Columbia University: Columbia University Launches the World’s First ‘Carbon Dioxide Removal Law’ Database. “The site has 530 resources on legal issues related to carbon dioxide removal, including such techniques as: direct air capture; enhanced weathering; afforestation/reforestation; bioenergy with carbon capture and storage; biochar; ocean and coastal carbon dioxide removal; ocean iron fertilization; and soil carbon sequestration. The database also includes 239 legal resources on carbon capture and storage, utilization, and transportation. New resources are constantly being added.”

University of Texas at Austin: New Tool Models Future Energy Costs and Carbon Implications for 13 U.S. Areas

University of Texas at Austin: New Tool Models Future Energy Costs and Carbon Implications for 13 U.S. Areas. “Building upon the multiyear interdisciplinary Energy Infrastructure of the Future study, the new dashboard allows users to create their own scenarios for one of 13 U.S. regions for the year 2050. Users can model energy infrastructure pathways by varying three key sets of inputs: the mix of electricity generation sources, the percentage of light-duty vehicles that are electric, and the percentage of households heated by natural gas and electricity.”

BBC: Google says its carbon footprint is now zero

BBC: Google says its carbon footprint is now zero. “Google says it has wiped out its entire carbon footprint by investing in ‘high-quality carbon offsets’. It became carbon-neutral in 2007 and says it has now compensated for all of the carbon it has ever created. It also aimed to run all of its data centres and offices on carbon-free energy by 2030, chief executive Sundar Pichai has announced.”

MIT News: Shrinking deep learning’s carbon footprint

MIT News: Shrinking deep learning’s carbon footprint. “Some of the excitement over AI’s recent progress has shifted to alarm. In a study last year, researchers at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst estimated that training a large deep-learning model produces 626,000 pounds of planet-warming carbon dioxide, equal to the lifetime emissions of five cars. As models grow bigger, their demand for computing is outpacing improvements in hardware efficiency. Chips specialized for neural-network processing, like GPUs (graphics processing units) and TPUs (tensor processing units), have offset the demand for more computing, but not by enough.”

Intelligent Transport: ITF launches Transport Climate Action Directory

Intelligent Transport: ITF launches Transport Climate Action Directory. ITF is the International Transport Forum. “The Directory aims to provide decision makers with a range of options that can deliver concrete decarbonisation outcomes for transport in their specific national context, helping them to translate their decarbonisation ambitions into actions. It specifically aims to support countries in the upcoming first revision of their nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) for the 2021 Conference of Parties (COP26) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).”

Morning Consult: New Database Shows California’s Edison International Had Lowest Average Emission Rate in 2019

Morning Consult: New Database Shows California’s Edison International Had Lowest Average Emission Rate in 2019. “New self-reported data from some of the biggest U.S. electric companies shows those emitting the least carbon per megawatt hour have taken three different avenues to their low rates, with the three topping the list boasting high shares of renewables, natural gas or nuclear in their resource mixes, respectively. Edison Electric Institute, an association representing all investor-owned electric companies in the country, worked with the World Resources Institute to create a database of carbon emission intensity, among other information, for electricity delivered by distribution company. The database was made public on June 18.”

Washington Post: Global emissions plunged an unprecedented 17 percent during the coronavirus pandemic

Washington Post: Global emissions plunged an unprecedented 17 percent during the coronavirus pandemic. “As covid-19 infections surged in March and April, nations around the globe experienced an abrupt reduction in driving, flying and industrial output, leading to a startling decline of more than a billion tons of carbon dioxide emissions. That includes a peak decline in daily emissions of 17 percent in early April, according to the study published in the journal Nature Climate Change. For some nations, the drop was much steeper.”

MakeUseOf: 5 Best Free Apps to Calculate Your Carbon Footprint and Offset Emissions

MakeUseOf: 5 Best Free Apps to Calculate Your Carbon Footprint and Offset Emissions. “Your carbon footprint is the total of greenhouse gases, mainly carbon dioxide, that you release in the air. It’s not what you breathe out, it’s the direct and indirect emission of your every activity. From using a car for travel to eating meat and dairy, each choice and activity in the modern world carries its own carbon emissions. Once you calculate your personal carbon footprint, you’ll be able to figure out how much of an impact these choices have on the environment. And through small steps, you can reduce your footprint.”