Black Enterprise: Database Makes Black Women With Ph.D.s In Physics More Discoverable

New-to-me, from Black Enterprise: Database Makes Black Women With Ph.D.s In Physics More Discoverable. “Out of the 2,000 physics Ph.D.s that are awarded in the U.S. each year, less than 0.5% of those are reportedly given to women of African descent. Doctor of Cosmology and University of New Hampshire professor, Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, is tackling the lack of representation in scientific research through Cite Black Women+ in Physics and Astronomy Bibliography, a database that lists professional publications by Black women who hold Ph.D.s in physics-related disciplines.”

Hold the Front Page: Former editor creates dictionary of “lost language of newspapers”

Hold the Front Page: Former editor creates dictionary of “lost language of newspapers”. “Neil Benson has created a glossary of both current and extinct newspaper production terms after launching an appeal on Facebook for journalists to contribute to it. The glossary features dozens of terms used throughout the newspaper industry’s history and has been widely shared since being published on his blog.”

Screen Daily: Amid a skills shortage, ‘Talented U’ database showcases 300 UK-based Ukrainian film and TV professionals

Screen Daily: Amid a skills shortage, ‘Talented U’ database showcases 300 UK-based Ukrainian film and TV professionals. “Over 300 Ukrainian film and TV workers living in the UK have signed up to a new online database, Talented U, that aims to help industry professionals forced to flee Ukraine since the Russian invasion to continue their careers and contribute their skills to the UK industry, which is currently in the throes of a skills shortage.”

PR Newswire: The It Gets Better Project Premieres New Web-Series Highlighting LGBTQ+ Professionals In Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Industries (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: The It Gets Better Project Premieres New Web-Series Highlighting LGBTQ+ Professionals In Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Industries (PRESS RELEASE). “Today, the It Gets Better Project premiered a new original web-series called Industry, which takes a closer look at LGBTQ+ STEM professionals and the experiences that led them to careers within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.”

PR Newswire: New Website Helps Public Health Job Seekers Nationwide (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: New Website Helps Public Health Job Seekers Nationwide. (PRESS RELEASE). “The site offers a simple way to search for jobs both nationally and by state and includes job preview videos of several different public health careers as well as information on working in governmental public health. In the future, add-ons to the site will include additional career spotlights as well as fellowship, internship and training programs in governmental health departments, a job-skills quiz to help identify potential career fits, and career resources for those seeking their first job in government.”

Business Journal: Ohio’s New Career Resource Navigator Aims to Help Job Seekers Overcome Barriers

Business Journal: Ohio’s New Career Resource Navigator Aims to Help Job Seekers Overcome Barriers. “An individual, career counselor, workforce professional or others looking for support need only to answer a few questions and a list is created of programs and resources tailored to assist them or someone they are helping, said [Matt] Damschroder. Assistance is available in a variety of areas such as managing a disability, obtaining education or skills and locating support such as childcare or transportation.”

Texas McCombs: Tweeting Their Way to Higher Pay

Texas McCombs: Tweeting Their Way to Higher Pay. “In a recent study, Texas McCombs professor of information, risk, and operations management Andrew Whinston found that savvy executive candidates such as CEOs and CIOs who modestly — but frequently — tout their knowledge, expertise, and skills on Twitter were 32% more likely to attract higher-paying job offers after interviews.”

CNBC: Why tech workers are quitting great jobs at companies like Google to fight climate change

CNBC: Why tech workers are quitting great jobs at companies like Google to fight climate change. “Tech workers are walking away from high-paying jobs with great perks to help fight what they believe is the greatest existential problem of our lifetimes: climate change. In some cases, that has meant taking a pay cut. But Sandy Anuras, who recently joined home solar provider Sunrun as its chief technology officer, says a big paycheck sometimes comes with a price.”

Harvard Business Review: Is Data Scientist Still the Sexiest Job of the 21st Century?

Harvard Business Review: Is Data Scientist Still the Sexiest Job of the 21st Century?. That noise you hear is me cringing at the headline. “In our research for the original article, many data scientists noted that they spend much of their time cleaning and wrangling data, and that is still the case despite a few advances in using AI itself for data management improvements. In addition, many organizations don’t have data-driven cultures and don’t take advantage of the insights provided by data scientists. Being hired and paid well doesn’t mean that data scientists will make a difference in their employers. Even so, the job has changed — in both large and small ways.”

BusinessWire: CYBER. ORG Launches Project Access, a National Effort to Increase Access to Cybersecurity Education for Students with Disabilities (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: CYBER.ORG Launches Project Access, a National Effort to Increase Access to Cybersecurity Education for Students with Disabilities (PRESS RELEASE). “Through the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency’s Cybersecurity Education and Training Assistance Program (CETAP) grant, CYBER.ORG is pioneering a series of camps this summer in Arkansas, Maine, Virginia, and Michigan to introduce blind and vision impaired students to key cybersecurity topics, help them develop cybersecurity skills, and explore the possibility of a career in a growing industry.”

Denver Post: The Great Resignation bought more attention to the gender gap. Business leaders are finding ways to welcome women back to the workplace.

Denver Post: The Great Resignation bought more attention to the gender gap. Business leaders are finding ways to welcome women back to the workplace.. “The Colorado Women’s Chamber of Commerce and TARRA, a Denver-based flexible office and membership workspace, teamed up with researchers from Metropolitan State University Denver to explore solutions. The result is the paper ‘The Great Reset: Women in the Workforce 2022.’ The issues the paper explored include: women were 24% more likely to permanently lose their jobs because of the pandemic; women cut their hours or left the workforce at three to four times the rate of men; and full-time working mothers’ median annual earnings are 29% lower than working fathers’ pay.”

Los Angeles Times: Meet the couple behind Artists Who Code, a group helping artists switch careers to tech

Los Angeles Times: Meet the couple behind Artists Who Code, a group helping artists switch careers to tech. “Less than 10 people joined their first informal Zoom meeting in March 2020. But as word spread over the past two years, the group, now called Artists Who Code, has grown to about 280 members across the U.S. and abroad. The volunteer-run organization offers guidance and emotional support for artists interested in or currently working in technology.”

CNET: LinkedIn wants to normalize career breaks with new feature

CNET: LinkedIn wants to normalize career breaks with new feature. “Business-oriented social network LinkedIn says it’s trying to end the stigma surrounding career breaks by encouraging users to highlight what they learned from these experiences. The Microsoft-owned company is releasing a feature on Tuesday that will allow people to add a career break to their LinkedIn profiles through the desktop site or mobile app, giving them a way to explain the gaps in their resume.”

University of California: New publication helps youth evaluate post-high school ‘pathways’

University of California: New publication helps youth evaluate post-high school ‘pathways’. “The ‘Pathways to Your Future’ curriculum invites high school-aged youth – and their families – to map their unique situations and passions before embarking on their own road. Whereas similar guides might convey advice on a one-way street, this free download outlines a “hands-on” experience – in school settings or out-of-school programs – to help young people steer toward their best post-high-school education, training and career options.”