Pittsburgh Business Times: Google gives Carnegie Mellon University funding, staff to develop COVIDcast

Pittsburgh Business Times: Google gives Carnegie Mellon University funding, staff to develop COVIDcast . “Carnegie Mellon University received $1 million in funding from Google to further develop COVIDcast, a project to track and forecast localized coronavirus activity across the country, according to a news release. Google also announced it would provide CMU with a full time team of 12 Google fellows to support the work, in partnership with the university’s Delphi Research Group, for six months.”

Carnegie Mellon University: Live-Streamed Game Collects Sounds To Help Train Home-Based Artificial Intelligence

Carnegie Mellon University: Live-Streamed Game Collects Sounds To Help Train Home-Based Artificial Intelligence . “From yawning to closing the fridge door, a lot of sounds occur within the home. Such sounds could be useful for home-based artificial intelligence applications, but training that AI requires a robust and diverse set of samples. A video game developed by Carnegie Mellon University researchers leverages live streaming to collect sound donations from players that will populate an open-source database.”

SciTechDaily: Carnegie Mellon Tool Automatically Turns Math Into Beautiful and Instructive Illustrations

SciTechDaily: Carnegie Mellon Tool Automatically Turns Math Into Beautiful and Instructive Illustrations. “The tool enables users to create diagrams simply by typing an ordinary mathematical expression and letting the software do the drawing. Unlike a graphing calculator, these expressions aren’t limited to basic functions, but can be complex relationships from any area of mathematics. The researchers named it Penrose after the noted mathematician and physicist Roger Penrose, who is famous for using diagrams and other drawings to communicate complicated mathematical and scientific ideas.”

EurekAlert: Carnegie Mellon tool automatically turns math into pictures

EurekAlert: Carnegie Mellon tool automatically turns math into pictures. “Some people look at an equation and see a bunch of numbers and symbols; others see beauty. Thanks to a new tool created at Carnegie Mellon University, anyone can now translate the abstractions of mathematics into beautiful and instructive illustrations. The tool enables users to create diagrams simply by typing an ordinary mathematical expression and letting the software do the drawing. Unlike a graphing calculator, these expressions aren’t limited to basic functions, but can be complex relationships from any area of mathematics.”

Carnegie Mellon University: Self-reported COVID-19 Symptoms Show Promise for Disease Forecasts

Carnegie Mellon University: Self-reported COVID-19 Symptoms Show Promise for Disease Forecasts. “Self-reported descriptions of COVID-19-related symptoms, which Carnegie Mellon University researchers are gathering nationwide with the help of Facebook and Google, correlate well with test-confirmed cases of the disease, suggesting self-reports might soon help the researchers in forecasting COVID-19 activity. Ryan Tibshirani, co-leader of Carnegie Mellon’s Delphi COVID-19 Response Team, said millions of responses to CMU surveys by Facebook and Google users are providing the team with real-time estimates of disease activity at the county level for much of the United States.”

BetaNews: Facebook and Carnegie Mellon University launch COVID-19 symptom map

BetaNews: Facebook and Carnegie Mellon University launch COVID-19 symptom map. “Facebook, in partnership with Carnegie Mellon University, has launched a new interactive map to help people keep up to date with the spread of coronavirus across the US. For now, the map is based on surveys carried out around the country and it enables you to see how many people are experiencing symptoms associated with the disease. The map only covers the US at the moment, but there are plans to expand it to cover other countries soon.”

Carnegie Mellon University: Facebook and Carnegie Mellon Team To Gather COVID-19 Symptom Data

Carnegie Mellon University: Facebook and Carnegie Mellon Team To Gather COVID-19 Symptom Data. “Some Facebook users will now see a link at the top of their news feed that will lead them to an optional survey operated by Carnegie Mellon. Information from the survey will be used by CMU for its pandemic forecasting efforts and also will be shared with other collaborating universities. Aggregate information from the survey will be shared publicly.”

Reuters: Google asks users about symptoms for Carnegie Mellon coronavirus forecasting effort

Reuters: Google asks users about symptoms for Carnegie Mellon coronavirus forecasting effort. “Alphabet Inc’s Google said on Monday that over the last three days it had surveyed some users about their health at the request of Carnegie Mellon University researchers aiming to forecast the spread of coronavirus infections.”

Engadget: Carnegie Mellon built an ‘opt-out’ system for nearby tracking devices

Engadget: Carnegie Mellon built an ‘opt-out’ system for nearby tracking devices. “It’s getting easier to control what your smart home devices share, but what about the connected devices beyond your home? Researchers at Carnegie Mellon’s CyLab think they can give you more control. They’ve developed an infrastructure and matching mobile app (for Android and iOS) that not only informs you about the data nearby Internet of Things devices are collecting, but lets you opt in or out. If you’re not comfortable that a device in the hallway is tracking your presence, you can tell it to forget you.”

Carnegie Mellon University: Leading AI Scholars Featured in New Oral Archive

Carnegie Mellon University: Leading AI Scholars Featured in New Oral Archive. “[Illah] Nourbakhsh and [Jennifer] Keating have captured the thoughts of some leading AI scholars in a new oral archive that became available online this year. It includes video and transcripts from 22 people, including MIT’s Daniela Rus, Harvard University’s Barbara Grosz and Microsoft’s Eric Horvitz, as well as a number of CMU faculty members such as Martial Hebert, David Danks, Mark Kamlet, Tuomas Sandholm and Jim Herbsleb.”

EurekAlert: Carnegie Mellon leverages AI to give voice to the voiceless

EurekAlert: Carnegie Mellon leverages AI to give voice to the voiceless. “The [ Carnegie Mellon University’s Language Technologies Institute (LTI)] researchers have developed a system that leverages artificial intelligence to rapidly analyze hundreds of thousands of comments on social media and identify the fraction that defend or sympathize with disenfranchised minorities such as the Rohingya community. Human social media moderators, who couldn’t possibly manually sift through so many comments, would then have the option to highlight this ‘help speech’ in comment sections.”

Carnegie Mellon University: Machine Learning Tool Helps Human Rights Workers Seek Justice

Carnegie Mellon University: Machine Learning Tool Helps Human Rights Workers Seek Justice. “Interdisciplinary researchers at CMU created a tool that can scan thousands of hours of multimedia in a matter of minutes. It can help human rights practitioners build cases against war criminals.”

Carnegie Mellon University: Carnegie Mellon Publishing Agreement Marks Open Access Milestone

Carnegie Mellon University: Carnegie Mellon Publishing Agreement Marks Open Access Milestone. “The university recently reached a transformative agreement with the scientific publishing giant Elsevier that prioritizes free and public access to the university’s research. This comes at a time when universities around the world are working to transition the current subscription system of scientific journal publishing to new open access business models. Under the terms of the agreement, which is the first of its kind between Elsevier and a university in the United States, Carnegie Mellon scholars will have access to all Elsevier academic journals. Beginning Jan. 1, 2020, articles with a corresponding CMU author published through Elsevier also will be open access.”

EurekAlert: Carnegie Mellon system locates shooters using smartphone video

EurekAlert: Carnegie Mellon system locates shooters using smartphone video. “Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a system that can accurately locate a shooter based on video recordings from as few as three smartphones. When demonstrated using three video recordings from the 2017 mass shooting in Las Vegas that left 58 people dead and hundreds wounded, the system correctly estimated the shooter’s actual location — the north wing of the Mandalay Bay hotel.”

Carnegie Mellon University: CMU Team Uses AI to Help Machines Play Nice with Humans

Carnegie Mellon University: CMU Team Uses AI to Help Machines Play Nice with Humans. “The researchers received a $2.8 million DARPA grant to study team collective intelligence and the theory of mind involving human and machine interactions. Team collective intelligence relates to the ability of a team to work together across a range of tasks. Theory of the mind explores how a person can understand what others are thinking, and how they may react to something, based on subtle nonverbal cues.”