BBC: ‘I was terrible at crosswords so I built an AI to do them’

BBC: ‘I was terrible at crosswords so I built an AI to do them’. “Matt Ginsberg is good at a lot of things – he is an AI scientist, author, playwright, magician and stunt plane pilot. But he isn’t very good at crosswords. In fact, despite writing them for the New York Times, he says that when they are published, he often cannot solve his own. So when he was sitting in a hotel ballroom losing yet again in a major US crossword competition, he decided to do something about it.”

Among Us: How to play everyone’s game obsession online (and use the new free Airship Map) (CNET)

CNET: Among Us: How to play everyone’s game obsession online (and use the new free Airship Map). “If you’ve spent any time on Twitter or around a person under age 30, you’ve probably become familiar with memes involving colorful Teletubby-like figures clad in spacesuits. These are the players of Among Us, which skyrocketed in popularity over the past few months…. We’ve got everything you need to know about Among Us right here to get you ready for some remote gaming.”

Game changer: Video game could help improve brain function for children with disabilities (Times Colonist)

Times Colonist: Game changer: Video game could help improve brain function for children with disabilities. “Researchers at the University of Victoria have tapped into a booming gaming industry to help improve brain function and cognitive abilities in children with disabilities. A team at UVic, building on years of study, have partnered with the private sector to create Dino Island, a video game that takes children with neurodevelopment disabilities on a tour of a fictitious, digitized island where they face a progressive series of challenges in the hopes of improving their brain function.”

Game Jam Winner Spotlight: Fish Magic (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Game Jam Winner Spotlight: Fish Magic. “Today, we finish our journey through the winners of the third annual public domain game jam, Gaming Like It’s 1925. We’ve covered ~THE GREAT GATSBY~, The Great Gatsby Tabletop Roleplaying Game, Art Apart and There Are No Eyes Here, Remembering Grußau, and Rhythm Action Gatsby, and now it’s time for the final winner: Best Analog Game recipient Fish Magic by David Harris.”

EurekAlert: Pretty gameful!

EurekAlert: Pretty gameful!. “To get children and young people interested in the topic of quantum physics, the research alliance is developing an entertaining mobile game that is intended to be played around the world. Based on a popular quantum mechanics thought experiment by Erwin Schrödinger, the players accompany ‘their’ cat through a crazy quantum world and solve attractive brainteasers along the way.”

Game Jam Winner Spotlight: Rhythm Action Gatsby (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Game Jam Winner Spotlight: Rhythm Action Gatsby. “From the name alone, you can probably guess what the game is: rhythm action games are a popular genre, and hey, why not make one for The Great Gatsby? The premise is presented as a joke, with the designer describing it as ‘the way F. Scott Fitzgerald would have wanted his legacy to be maintained’ — but the game doesn’t just lean on this one bit of amusing silliness, nor does it cut any corners in fulfilling its promise. Rather, it’s full of handcrafted original material.”

Game Jam Winner Spotlight: The Great Gatsby Tabletop Roleplaying Game (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Game Jam Winner Spotlight: The Great Gatsby Tabletop Roleplaying Game. “Best Adaptation is always an interesting category in these jams, because every entry is on some level an adaptation, but that doesn’t mean they are all truly good candidates for the prize. Some make use of elements of a public domain work in a way that detaches them from their source, others focus so closely on the source that it is more like a study of the original — both those things can be amazing, and both approaches show up among our winners this year. But there’s also something special about a game that turns a public domain work into something brand new while also carrying forth and further exploring its original meaning and context. That’s the kind of game that is a candidate for Best Adaptation, and that’s the kind of game The Great Gatsby: The Tabletop Roleplaying […]

PC Gamer: No, Tabletop Simulator, you can’t outsource localisation to Google Translate

PC Gamer: No, Tabletop Simulator, you can’t outsource localisation to Google Translate. “Listen, Google Translate isn’t terrible in a pinch. If you need to quickly work out how to say ‘sandwich’ in German, it’ll do. Unfortunately, Tabletop Simulator developer Berserk discovered the hard way that you can’t replace a full localisation team with Google’s web tool. Last week’s update claimed to bump the number of supported languages in the table-flipper up to 29. But non-anglophone players quickly discovered this claim came with a massive caveat—namely, that the new translations seemed to have been hastily thrown together using Google Translate, with disastrous results.”

Techdirt: Announcing The Winners Of The 3rd Annual Public Domain Game Jam!

Techdirt: Announcing The Winners Of The 3rd Annual Public Domain Game Jam!. “It’s that time again — the judges’ scores and comments are in, and we’ve selected the winners of our third annual public domain game jam, Gaming Like It’s 1925! As you know, we asked game designers of all stripes to submit new creations based on works published in 1925 that entered the public domain in the US this year — and just as in the past two jams, people got very creative in terms of choosing source material and deciding what to do with it.”

MakeUseOf: 4 Ways to Play Adobe Flash Games Without Flash

MakeUseOf: 4 Ways to Play Adobe Flash Games Without Flash. “Flash was a pillar of the internet through the 2000s and over a period of 20 years built a gaming legacy of unprecedented proportions, spanning tens of thousands of games. Now, as the websites hosting Flash content come down, many people are wondering, ‘will Flash’s gaming legacy suffer the same fate?’ In this article, we list a handful of projects intent on preserving Flash games for future generations.”

North Carolina State University: Tracing the History of Mobile Games

North Carolina State University: Tracing the History of Mobile Games . “NC State’s Mobile Gaming Research Lab is launching the Retro Mobile Gaming Database (RMGD). The RMGD is an online, publicly searchable database of early mobile games, intended for use by game scholars, students interested in games, and game enthusiasts. And if there are games missing from the database, we want you to tell us about them.”

New York Times: The Lasting Lessons of John Conway’s Game of Life

New York Times: The Lasting Lessons of John Conway’s Game of Life. “In March of 1970, Martin Gardner opened a letter jammed with ideas for his Mathematical Games column in Scientific American. Sent by John Horton Conway, then a mathematician at the University of Cambridge, the letter ran 12 pages, typed hunt-and-peck style. Page 9 began with the heading ‘The game of life.’ It described an elegant mathematical model of computation — a cellular automaton, a little machine, of sorts, with groups of cells that evolve from iteration to iteration, as a clock advances from one second to the next.”

VentureBeat: Opera acquires YoYo Games for $10 million and launches Opera Gaming division

VentureBeat: Opera acquires YoYo Games for $10 million and launches Opera Gaming division. “Web browser maker Opera has acquired YoYo Games, maker of the GameMaker Studio 2 game engine, for $10 million, and it has also launched its Opera Gaming division. The deal underscores Opera‘s efforts to differentiate its web browser, Opera GX, through a gaming community. Opera itself has more than 380 million people using its web browsers worldwide, but the new Opera GX gaming browser has seven million monthly active users as of December, up 350% from a year earlier.”