Gizmodo: Cameo Now Lets You Have 10-Minute Calls With Celebs

Gizmodo: Cameo Now Lets You Have 10-Minute Calls With Celebs. “Cameo, the app that already lets you pay celebrities (often D-list), corrupt politicians, athletes, and others(?) to record personalized video messages, is expanding to 10-minute, live video calls. Users won’t just get a pre-recorded message. Instead, they’ll be able to interact with their chosen victim in real-time.”

Digital Library of Georgia: Fifty Years of Speakers Honored at the University of Georgia School of Law Now Available Online

Digital Library of Georgia: Fifty Years of Speakers Honored at the University of Georgia School of Law Now Available Online. “The collection features photographs of U.S. and Georgia political and legal figures during the latter part of the 20th century. Former President Jimmy Carter; U.S. Supreme Court Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Antonin Scalia, and Clarence Thomas; and U.S. Secretaries of State Henry Kissinger and Dean Rusk are among the prominent national figures. Important legal leaders include Lawrence Lessig, Brooksley Born, and Sarah Weddington. Georgia politicians include former Governors Carl Sanders, Roy Barnes, and Zell Miller; U.S. Senators Max Cleland and Sam Nunn; among others.”

Culture Map Houston: Beyoncé rules the internet with historic Twitter emoji celebrating her wildly anticipated new album

Culture Map Houston: Beyoncé rules the internet with historic Twitter emoji celebrating her wildly anticipated new album. “Now, in honor of the news that broke the internet this summer, Twitter has released a new fandom emoji in honor of Houston’s icon. Notably, this is only the second time ever that Twitter is creating an emoji for a fandom: BTS, the insanely popular K-Pop act, received the first custom fandom emoji in 2017 when the group reached 10 million followers.”

NPR: Amid the hype, they bought crypto near its peak. Now, they cope with painful losses

NPR: Amid the hype, they bought crypto near its peak. Now, they cope with painful losses. “Quarterback Tom Brady and his wife, supermodel Gisele Bündchen, starred in an ad for FTX, and a commercial for Crypto.com featured Academy Award-winning actor Matt Damon. These were designed to appeal to a potential investor’s fear of missing out. ‘Fortune favors the brave,’ Damon says. The ads included little-to-no explanation of crypto, and how risky the unregulated asset is. About two weeks after that Crypto.com ad debuted, Bitcoin set a new record: $68,990. Today, it’s less than a third of that.”

The Conversation: Celebrity deepfakes are all over TikTok. Here’s why they’re becoming common – and how you can spot them

The Conversation: Celebrity deepfakes are all over TikTok. Here’s why they’re becoming common – and how you can spot them. “Although deepfakes are often used creatively or for fun, they’re increasingly being deployed in disinformation campaigns, for identity fraud and to discredit public figures and celebrities. And while the technology needed to make them is sophisticated, it’s becoming increasingly accessible, leaving detection software and regulation lagging behind. One thing is for sure – deepfakes are here to stay. So what can we do about them?”

The Verge: Google celebrates Army’s anniversary with BTS street view tour

The Verge: Google celebrates Army’s anniversary with BTS street view tour. “July 9th marks the ninth birthday of the BTS Army (specifically, the official announcement of its name). As Twitter celebrates the anniversary, Google has released a new street view experiment through its Arts & Culture platform in collaboration with the band. The BTS x Street Galleries exhibition brings viewers on a virtual tour of the group’s favorite artworks.”

Rest of World: Argentina’s Supreme Court backs Google, says “right to be forgotten” can infringe on freedom of information

Rest of World: Argentina’s Supreme Court backs Google, says “right to be forgotten” can infringe on freedom of information. “The Argentine Supreme Court denied celebrity Natalia Denegri’s petition to have content about a scandal she was involved in more than 25 years ago removed from search engines on Tuesday. It is the first ruling by a Supreme Court in Latin America on the ‘right to be forgotten,’ which allows the public to control their online history.”

Business Insider: The teen who tracks Elon Musk’s jet has begun monitoring private jets for celebrities like Tom Cruise and Kim Kardashian

Business Insider: The teen who tracks Elon Musk’s jet has begun monitoring private jets for celebrities like Tom Cruise and Kim Kardashian. “Jack Sweeney, 19, said on Monday via Twitter that he had begun tracking four of Tom Cruise’s private jets under his Twitter account… The account has nearly 28,000 followers and also appears to track the travel patterns of several other celebrities, including Jay-Z, Taylor Swift, and Kim Kardashian.”

Cooper Union: New Online Archive Offers A Glimpse Into More Than A Century Of American History

The Cooper Union: New Online Archive Offers A Glimpse Into More Than A Century Of American History. “Voices from the Great Hall is a digital archive, free and accessible to anyone, and generously supported by The Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation. This growing collection presents all known sound and video recordings made in Cooper Union’s historic Great Hall dating back to 1941 and continuing to the present, as well as 8,900 objects, such as photographs, tickets, and fliers, related to more than 3,000 Great Hall programs dating to 1859.”

NBC News: Celebrity-endorsed NFTs leave some investors ‘financially crippled’

NBC News: Celebrity-endorsed NFTs leave some investors ‘financially crippled’. “It’s a pattern that crypto critics, watchdogs and even some influencers point to as an ongoing problem: digital investments riding a wave of NFT enthusiasm and backed by high-profile endorsements that quickly lose value. In some cases, in the crypto world, it’s what’s known as a ‘rug pull.’ But more broadly, ad transparency experts warn, public figures are promoting NFTs often without having done due diligence or warning their fans about the serious financial risks.”

New York Times: All Those Celebrities Pushing Crypto Are Not So Vocal Now

New York Times: All Those Celebrities Pushing Crypto Are Not So Vocal Now. “The Super Bowl was nicknamed the ‘Crypto Bowl’ this year because so many ads — which cost as much as $7 million for 30 seconds — featured the industry, several of them starring boldface names. But after investors watched hundreds of billions of dollars disappear in a sell-off this month, those famous boosters now face intensifying criticism that they helped drive vulnerable fans to invest in crypto without emphasizing the risks.”

Dissection by TikTok: Johnny Depp, Amber Heard trial posts are making accidental influencers out of some, targets out of others (CNN)

CNN: Dissection by TikTok: Johnny Depp, Amber Heard trial posts are making accidental influencers out of some, targets out of others. “Sophie Doggett, whose TikTok was previously populated by videos on everyday things such as herself or her pets, posted to her TikTok account on April 25 a clip of Heard’s lawyer asking a question of a witness and then immediately objecting to the response. It is one of many moments in the trial that has been seized upon by people like Doggett, as clips of testimony and references to the case have pervaded TikTok in a way that no trial has before…. Doggett, who paired the clip to playful music, said she gained 30,000 followers seemingly overnight from the post which has, to date, been viewed more than 5 million times.”

Washington Post: How Twitter lost the celebs

Washington Post: How Twitter lost the celebs. “Interviews with 17 people who represent, consult and tweet for celebrities show that Twitter is viewed as a high-risk, low-reward platform for many A-list entertainers. It’s a place where the discourse has become so politicized that many prefer not to engage personally at all, delegating tweeting duties to underlings or outside agents who post anodyne promotional messages. They have also been turned off by harassment or abuse.”

Christian Science Monitor: Why a museum sold Mandela’s arrest warrant as an NFT

Christian Science Monitor: Why a museum sold Mandela’s arrest warrant as an NFT. “It was the first archival document in South Africa to be sold as an NFT, and the proceeds will benefit the struggling museum that now sits on the site of Liliesleaf Farm. On a continent whose historical artifacts have routinely been plundered by outsiders, the sale has been hailed as a savvy way for African countries to hold on to their heritage while also cashing in on the global elite’s new obsession with digital collectibles. But it also raises concerns about what could happen when the past – or a virtual copy of it – is auctioned off to the highest bidder.”