CNN: Why conspiracy theorists think 5G is bad for your health and why experts say not to worry

CNN: Why conspiracy theorists think 5G is bad for your health and why experts say not to worry. “…concerns about 5G’s effects on health were spreading even before coronavirus. Experts say these fears, too, are unfounded. ‘Is there anything to worry about? The short answer is no,’ said Chris Collins, a professor and research director in the radiology department at the New York University School of Medicine.”

BetaNews: Protocol flaws leave 5G and other mobile networks open to vulnerabilities

BetaNews: Protocol flaws leave 5G and other mobile networks open to vulnerabilities. “Vulnerabilities affecting mobile and 5G networks are putting industrial equipment, smart homes, and city infrastructure at risk according to a new report. Produced by Positive Technologies, this is the fourth in a series of reports on the greatest threats and vulnerabilities in the mobile ecosystem. It highlights the cyber security risks to networks that originate with the GTP protocol — which is used to transmit user data and control traffic on 2G, 3G, and 4G networks.”

Wired: The WIRED Guide to 5G

Wired: The WIRED Guide to 5G. “5G isn’t a single technology or standard, but rather a constellation of different technologies, and deploying them could require a radically different approach than building 4G networks. Carriers have launched demos and pilot programs that demonstrate big leaps in wireless performance, but mobile networks based on the ‘millimeter-wave’ technology that may deliver the fastest speeds probably won’t be widely available for years.”

Ars Technica: DOD joins fight against 5G spectrum proposal, citing risks to GPS

Ars Technica: DOD joins fight against 5G spectrum proposal, citing risks to GPS. “The Department of Defense has weighed in against a proposal before the Federal Communications Commission to open the 1 to 2 Gigahertz frequency range—the L band—for use in 5G cellular networks. The reason: segments of that range of radio spectrum are already used by Global Positioning System signals and other military systems.”

TechCrunch: New 5G flaws can track phone locations and spoof emergency alerts

TechCrunch: New 5G flaws can track phone locations and spoof emergency alerts. “Security researchers at Purdue University and the University of Iowa have found close to a dozen vulnerabilities, which they say can be used to track a victim’s real-time location, spoof emergency alerts that can trigger panic or silently disconnect a 5G-connected phone from the network altogether.”

Nature: Can tracking people through phone-call data improve lives?

Nature: Can tracking people through phone-call data improve lives?. “After an earthquake tore through Haiti in 2010, killing more than 100,000 people, aid agencies spread across the country to work out where the survivors had fled. But Linus Bengtsson, a graduate student studying global health at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, thought he could answer the question from afar. Many Haitians would be using their mobile phones, he reasoned, and those calls would pass through phone towers, which could allow researchers to approximate people’s locations.”

TechCrunch: New flaws in 4G, 5G allow attackers to intercept calls and track phone locations

TechCrunch: New flaws in 4G, 5G allow attackers to intercept calls and track phone locations. “A group of academics have found three new security flaws in 4G and 5G, which they say can be used to intercept phone calls and track the locations of cell phone users. The findings are said to be the first time vulnerabilities have affected both 4G and the incoming 5G standard, which promises faster speeds and better security, particularly against law enforcement use of cell site simulators, known as ‘stingrays.’ But the researchers say that their new attacks can defeat newer protections that were believed to make it more difficult to snoop on phone users.”

Ars Technica: LTE wireless connections used by billions aren’t as secure as we thought

Ars Technica: LTE wireless connections used by billions aren’t as secure as we thought. “The Long Term Evolution mobile device standard used by billions of people was designed to fix many of the security shortcomings in the predecessor standard known as Global System for Mobile communications. Mutual authentication between end users and base stations and the use of proven encryption schemes were two of the major overhauls. Now, researchers are publicly identifying weaknesses in LTE that allow attackers to send nearby users to malicious websites and fingerprint the sites they visit.”

ZDNet: New LTE attacks can snoop on messages, track locations and spoof emergency alerts

ZDNet: New LTE attacks can snoop on messages, track locations and spoof emergency alerts . “A slew of newly discovered vulnerabilities can wreak havoc on 4G LTE network users by eavesdropping on phone calls and text messages, knocking devices offline, and even spoofing emergency alerts. Ten attacks detailed in a new paper by researchers at Purdue University and the University of Iowa expose weaknesses in three critical protocol operations of the cellular network, such as securely attaching a device to the network and maintaining a connection to receive calls and messages.”

Facebook Launches Open Source OpenCellular Internet Access Platform

Facebook has open-sourced a platform for Internet access in remote/developing areas. “Facebook is clearly very serious about its mission to connect the world and in the process, it has launched solar-powered drones that use lasers to connect to each other and the ground, and more prosaic efforts like new antennas for covering both urban and rural areas. Today, Facebook is expanding this work with the launch of OpenCellular, a new open source hardware and software project that aims to bring a more affordable wireless access platform to remote areas.”

Google Opens Project Fi to Everyone

Google has opened its Project Fi cell phone service to everybody. “With Fi, which runs on the networks of T-Mobile and Sprint — depending on which one offers better receptions in a given area — customers pay a base fee of $20 per month and then an addition $10 per GB of data. If you overpay for your data in a given month, the service simply refunds you the difference.”

India’s Telecom Minister Concerned About Project Loon

The Telecom Minister of India is worried that Google’s Project Loon will interfere with cellular operations. “The statement of the Minister assumes significance in the backdrop of call drop problem faced by consumers due to poor network quality. On a query that whether there are technical glitches in according approval to Project Loon, the Minister replied in affirmative.”