Wired: The WIRED Guide to 5G

Wired: The WIRED Guide to 5G. “5G isn’t a single technology or standard, but rather a constellation of different technologies, and deploying them could require a radically different approach than building 4G networks. Carriers have launched demos and pilot programs that demonstrate big leaps in wireless performance, but mobile networks based on the ‘millimeter-wave’ technology that may deliver the fastest speeds probably won’t be widely available for years.”

Ars Technica: DOD joins fight against 5G spectrum proposal, citing risks to GPS

Ars Technica: DOD joins fight against 5G spectrum proposal, citing risks to GPS. “The Department of Defense has weighed in against a proposal before the Federal Communications Commission to open the 1 to 2 Gigahertz frequency range—the L band—for use in 5G cellular networks. The reason: segments of that range of radio spectrum are already used by Global Positioning System signals and other military systems.”

TechCrunch: New 5G flaws can track phone locations and spoof emergency alerts

TechCrunch: New 5G flaws can track phone locations and spoof emergency alerts. “Security researchers at Purdue University and the University of Iowa have found close to a dozen vulnerabilities, which they say can be used to track a victim’s real-time location, spoof emergency alerts that can trigger panic or silently disconnect a 5G-connected phone from the network altogether.”

Nature: Can tracking people through phone-call data improve lives?

Nature: Can tracking people through phone-call data improve lives?. “After an earthquake tore through Haiti in 2010, killing more than 100,000 people, aid agencies spread across the country to work out where the survivors had fled. But Linus Bengtsson, a graduate student studying global health at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, thought he could answer the question from afar. Many Haitians would be using their mobile phones, he reasoned, and those calls would pass through phone towers, which could allow researchers to approximate people’s locations.”

TechCrunch: New flaws in 4G, 5G allow attackers to intercept calls and track phone locations

TechCrunch: New flaws in 4G, 5G allow attackers to intercept calls and track phone locations. “A group of academics have found three new security flaws in 4G and 5G, which they say can be used to intercept phone calls and track the locations of cell phone users. The findings are said to be the first time vulnerabilities have affected both 4G and the incoming 5G standard, which promises faster speeds and better security, particularly against law enforcement use of cell site simulators, known as ‘stingrays.’ But the researchers say that their new attacks can defeat newer protections that were believed to make it more difficult to snoop on phone users.”

Ars Technica: LTE wireless connections used by billions aren’t as secure as we thought

Ars Technica: LTE wireless connections used by billions aren’t as secure as we thought. “The Long Term Evolution mobile device standard used by billions of people was designed to fix many of the security shortcomings in the predecessor standard known as Global System for Mobile communications. Mutual authentication between end users and base stations and the use of proven encryption schemes were two of the major overhauls. Now, researchers are publicly identifying weaknesses in LTE that allow attackers to send nearby users to malicious websites and fingerprint the sites they visit.”