New York Times: India Proposes Chinese-Style Internet Censorship

New York Times: India Proposes Chinese-Style Internet Censorship. “Under the proposed rules, Indian officials could demand that Facebook, Google, Twitter, TikTok and others remove posts or videos that they deem libelous, invasive of privacy, hateful or deceptive. Internet companies would also have to build automated screening tools to block Indians from seeing ‘unlawful information or content.’ Another provision would weaken the privacy protections of messaging services like WhatsApp so that the authorities could trace messages back to their original senders.”

Techdirt: Google Caves On Russian Censorship

Techdirt: Google Caves On Russian Censorship. “Late last year, we were among those disappointed by leaked news from Google that it was toying around with a censored search engine for China — a country that the company had mostly left nearly a decade ago. After loud complaints both from people outside the company and many within, reports in late December said that the company had quietly halted efforts to build a censored Chinese search engine. But now… the company may be dipping its toe in the evil pool again, as it has apparently agreed to cooperate with Russia’s censors.”

Yahoo News: Russian regulator demands Google filters search results

Yahoo News: Russian regulator demands Google filters search results. “Russian communications regulator Roskomnadzor has sent repeated requests to Google requiring it to route its citizens’ web searches through a government filtering system, according to reports. A law passed in Russia last year requires search engines to be connected to the federal state information system (FGIS) allowing the Kremlin to censor the websites which its citizens can access.”

Techdirt: Pakistan Demands Google Take Down Petition For Academic Freedom… Saying It Represents Hate Speech

Techdirt: Pakistan Demands Google Take Down Petition For Academic Freedom… Saying It Represents Hate Speech. “While it’s understandable (these days especially) that some are concerned about what they refer to as ‘hate speech,’ it’s worth reminding people (as we’ve done for years) that laws against hate speech are almost universally used by governments to punish people they don’t like, rather than to protect those who most people normally consider the targets of hate speech. Take this latest example, highlighted by FIRE, concerning an attempt by Pakistan to censor an online petition for academic freedom, claiming that it was hate speech.”

H-HistBibl: Launch of the digital archive “The Long Emergency. Media and Democracy in India”

H-HistBibl: Launch of the digital archive “The Long Emergency. Media and Democracy in India”. “The government of India declared a national emergency citing internal instability in June 1975. By June 26th, the day after emergency had been declared, media outlets in the country had received instructions on news that must be censored. Some newspapers ran blank editorials as protests. In the eighteen months that followed, the press censorship rules remained in effect and additional forms of pressure were exerted on the media. These ranged from the withdrawal of state advertisements to income tax raids on media owners and phone calls to journalists conveying ‘helpful suggestions’ about the news they might (or might not) carry. Many journalists were arrested for protesting the emergency, or for holding views that were considered inimical to state authority. Many others supported the emergency as a necessary measure. Most, however, lay low until the emergency was lifted and the media began reporting actively on the news that they had not covered in the years of the emergency, in a burst of ‘new journalism’ that would shine a light on post-emergency abuses of power as well.”

New York Times: Twitter Users in China Face Detention and Threats in New Beijing Crackdown

New York Times: Twitter Users in China Face Detention and Threats in New Beijing Crackdown. ” One man spent 15 days in a detention center. The police threatened another’s family. A third was chained to a chair for eight hours of interrogation. Their offense: posting on Twitter.”