Meduza: Court marshals visit Google’s Moscow office in connection with injunction against ‘Smart Vote’ search results

Meduza: Court marshals visit Google’s Moscow office in connection with injunction against ‘Smart Vote’ search results. “Court marshal’s visited Google’s Moscow office in the Balchug Plaza business center on the evening of Monday, September 13. Russia’s Federal Bailiffs Service (FSSP) told Interfax that the visit was in connection with enforcement proceedings that were opened on September 7, with regard to a court ruling prohibiting Google from showing results for the phrase umnoe golosovanie (‘smart vote’).”

Korea Herald: Politically censored S. Korean films to be released online

Korea Herald: Politically censored S. Korean films to be released online . “The Korean Film Archive announced that it will sequentially post a collection of South Korea’s earlier films censored by the state through the Korean Movie Database online history archive center, starting Thursday. The KOFA received donations and preserved some 10,000 materials regarding censorship from the Korea Council for Performing Arts Promotion, the predecessor of the current Korea Media Rating Board, from the mid-1950s to the mid-1990s. “

South China Morning Post: Popular science blogs disappear from WeChat, Weibo and Bilibili in Beijing’s latest internet content crackdown

South China Morning Post: Popular science blogs disappear from WeChat, Weibo and Bilibili in Beijing’s latest internet content crackdown. “Two popular science blogs in China were censored across social media platforms WeChat, Weibo and video-streaming site Bilibili, a surprising turn in Beijing’s escalating crackdown on internet content.”

ABC News: Twitter restricts account of expert who mocked China leader

ABC News: Twitter restricts account of expert who mocked China leader. “A New Zealand academic says Twitter temporarily restricted her account after she mocked Chinese President Xi Jinping. University of Canterbury Professor Anne-Marie Brady is an expert on China’s attempts to exert political influence around the world and has been an outspoken critic of its ruling Communist Party. Last week, she sent tweets poking fun at the party’s 100th anniversary celebrations.”

Los Angeles Times: He tried to commemorate erased history. China detained him, then erased that too

Los Angeles Times: He tried to commemorate erased history. China detained him, then erased that too. “Thousands of politically sensitive cases disappeared last month from China Judgments Online, the public archive. The deletions were first noticed by a Chinese activist with the Twitter handle @SpeechFreedomCN, who has been keeping an archive of speech crime cases. He has tracked more than 2,040 cases, dating to 2013, based on official documentation in China Judgments Online or public security bureaus’ reports on the social media apps Weibo and WeChat.”

National Coalition Against Censorship: Don’t Delete Art Hosts Workshop For Artists On How To Avoid Instagram Censorship

National Coalition Against Censorship: Don’t Delete Art Hosts Workshop For Artists On How To Avoid Instagram Censorship. “On June 2, 2021, artists Dina Brodsky, Savannah Spirit, and Spencer Tunick hosted a conversation to share advice on how to tag, contextualize, or modify artwork on Instagram so as to improve its chances of not being removed. The webinar is part of Don’t Delete Art, a gallery, resource center and campaign advocating for artistic freedom on social media. NCAC is a member of the coalition leading the initiative, which also includes PEN America’s Artists at Risk Connection (ARC), Freemuse, Article 19, International Arts Rights Advisors, and the IBEX Collective.” The webinar is about an hour long and is available on YouTube.

New York Times: China’s Censorship Widens to Hong Kong’s Vaunted Film Industry, With Global Implications

New York Times: China’s Censorship Widens to Hong Kong’s Vaunted Film Industry, With Global Implications. “The city’s government on Friday said it would begin blocking the distribution of films that are deemed to undermine national security, marking the official arrival of mainland Chinese-style censorship in one of Asia’s most celebrated filmmaking hubs.”

The Guardian: Microsoft blocks Bing from showing image results for Tiananmen ‘tank man’

The Guardian: Microsoft blocks Bing from showing image results for Tiananmen ‘tank man’. “Microsoft has blamed human error after its search engine, Bing, blocked image and video results for the phrase ‘tank man’ – a reference to the iconic image of a lone protester facing down tanks during the 1989 protests in Tiananmen Square – on the 32nd anniversary of the military crackdown.”

Quartz: Hong Kongers are using blockchain archives to fight government censorship

Quartz: Hong Kongers are using blockchain archives to fight government censorship. “Using blockchain to bypass censorship is not new. In 2018, for example, #MeToo activists in China used the Ethereum blockchain to preserve an open letter by a Peking University student who said she was being pressured by the administration to cease her activism on a sexual assault case.”