Techdirt: Chinese Professor Argues Google Should Launch A Censored Search Engine In China

Techdirt: Chinese Professor Argues Google Should Launch A Censored Search Engine In China. “The argument from Bai Tongdong, a professor of philosophy at Fudan University, is pretty straightforward. More or less, it argues that Baidu is not a very good search engine. Google, even in a heavily censored fashion, is almost certainly going to be a lot better, and thus it will certainly aid in getting everyday people in China more access to information.”

CNET: Saudi Arabia will punish satire online mocking ‘public order, religious values’

CNET: Saudi Arabia will punish satire online mocking ‘public order, religious values’. “In Saudi Arabia, posting satire online that ‘mocks, provokes or disrupts public order, religious values and public morals’ could cost you $800,000 and up to five years in jail, the Public Prosecution, a government agency, tweeted Monday.”

Human Rights Watch: Open Letter to Google on Reported Plans to Launch a Censored Search Engine in China

Human Rights Watch: Open Letter to Google on Reported Plans to Launch a Censored Search Engine in China. “Like many of Google’s own employees, we are extremely concerned by reports that Google is developing a new censored search engine app for the Chinese market. The project, codenamed ‘Dragonfly’, would represent an alarming capitulation by Google on human rights. The Chinese government extensively violates the rights to freedom of expression and privacy; by accommodating the Chinese authorities’ repression of dissent, Google would be actively participating in those violations for millions of internet users in China.”

Julia Reda: Out-of-control censorship machines removed my article warning of out-of-control censorship machines

Julia Reda: Out-of-control censorship machines removed my article warning of out-of-control censorship machines . “A few days ago, about a dozen articles and campaign sites criticising EU plans for copyright censorship machines silently vanished from the world’s most popular search engine. Proving their point in the most blatant possible way, the sites were removed by exactly what they were warning of: Copyright censorship machines. Among the websites that were made impossible to find: A blog post of mine in which I inform Europeans about where their governments stand on online censorship in the name of copyright and a campaign site warning of copyright law that favors corporations over free speech.”

Ars Technica: After employee revolt, Google says it is “not close” to launching search in China

Ars Technica: After employee revolt, Google says it is “not close” to launching search in China. “Google’s employees and Google’s management are clashing over ethical issues again. Just two months after Google’s ‘Project Maven’ military drone project was seemingly resolved, Google’s employees are now up in arms over company plans to create censored products for China. The internal protests resulted in the issue being addressed at an all-hands meeting, and we got to learn a bit more about Google’s China plans.”

New York Times: Google Employees Protest Secret Work on Censored Search Engine for China

New York Times: Google Employees Protest Secret Work on Censored Search Engine for China. “Hundreds of Google employees, upset at the company’s decision to secretly build a censored version of its search engine for China, have signed a letter demanding more transparency to understand the ethical consequences of their work.”

The Citizen Lab: How WeChat Filters Images For One Billion Users

The Citizen Lab: How WeChat Filters Images For One Billion Users. “With over 1 billion monthly users, WeChat boasts the title of most popular chat application in China and the fourth largest in the world. However, a new report by Citizen Lab researchers reveals exactly how the platform is able to censor images sent by these billion users.”