National Coalition Against Censorship: Don’t Delete Art Hosts Workshop For Artists On How To Avoid Instagram Censorship

National Coalition Against Censorship: Don’t Delete Art Hosts Workshop For Artists On How To Avoid Instagram Censorship. “On June 2, 2021, artists Dina Brodsky, Savannah Spirit, and Spencer Tunick hosted a conversation to share advice on how to tag, contextualize, or modify artwork on Instagram so as to improve its chances of not being removed. The webinar is part of Don’t Delete Art, a gallery, resource center and campaign advocating for artistic freedom on social media. NCAC is a member of the coalition leading the initiative, which also includes PEN America’s Artists at Risk Connection (ARC), Freemuse, Article 19, International Arts Rights Advisors, and the IBEX Collective.” The webinar is about an hour long and is available on YouTube.

New York Times: China’s Censorship Widens to Hong Kong’s Vaunted Film Industry, With Global Implications

New York Times: China’s Censorship Widens to Hong Kong’s Vaunted Film Industry, With Global Implications. “The city’s government on Friday said it would begin blocking the distribution of films that are deemed to undermine national security, marking the official arrival of mainland Chinese-style censorship in one of Asia’s most celebrated filmmaking hubs.”

The Guardian: Microsoft blocks Bing from showing image results for Tiananmen ‘tank man’

The Guardian: Microsoft blocks Bing from showing image results for Tiananmen ‘tank man’. “Microsoft has blamed human error after its search engine, Bing, blocked image and video results for the phrase ‘tank man’ – a reference to the iconic image of a lone protester facing down tanks during the 1989 protests in Tiananmen Square – on the 32nd anniversary of the military crackdown.”

Quartz: Hong Kongers are using blockchain archives to fight government censorship

Quartz: Hong Kongers are using blockchain archives to fight government censorship. “Using blockchain to bypass censorship is not new. In 2018, for example, #MeToo activists in China used the Ethereum blockchain to preserve an open letter by a Peking University student who said she was being pressured by the administration to cease her activism on a sexual assault case.”

Quartz: Dear India, here’s how to cope with a censored internet, xoxo China

Quartz: Dear India, here’s how to cope with a censored internet, xoxo China. “While bans on foreign platforms may not be imminent as some news reports suggest, the new restrictions are stoking fears that online news and dissent will be increasingly stifled. In China, as similar rules came into play, foreign social media platforms departed or were blocked, leading to the rise of Chinese platforms whose terms of agreement make clear that user communications will be shared with the government in many circumstances. As a result, internet users in China have long had practice circumventing their authorities’ watchful eyes. It might just be time for users in India—or anywhere really—to draw some valuable tips from their experience.”

Al Jazeera: Two plead guilty in case highlighting China’s online control

Al Jazeera: Two plead guilty in case highlighting China’s online control. “Two amateur computer coders in China have pleaded guilty to ‘stirring up trouble and picking quarrels’ in a case that highlighted Beijing’s growing crackdown on online activity. Chen Mei, 28, and Cai Wei, 27, created an online archive that stored articles that had been censored from the Chinese internet and an accompanying forum that allowed people to discuss them anonymously.”

NIKKEI Asia: Myanmar junta targets 100 celebrities active on social media

NIKKEI Asia: Myanmar junta targets 100 celebrities active on social media. “Myanmar’s junta has placed at least 100 celebrities on its wanted list for allegedly inciting protests against its seizure of power, taking aim at those with big social media followings. Since Friday, the nightly news on state television has named 20 prominent figures accused of violating the law. The list is later reprinted the next day in a government-controlled newspaper. The list swelled to 100 on Tuesday night.”

Quartz: With a Google spreadsheet, a web sleuth tracks the comments that get people jailed in China

New-to-me, from Quartz: With a Google spreadsheet, a web sleuth tracks the comments that get people jailed in China. “…since October 2019, a young web sleuth surnamed Wang has been creating a database of cases in which people were punished for online or offline comments critical of the central government. Based on media reports and court records, Wang has documented nearly 2,000 speech crimes in a public Google spreadsheet, arguably one of the few comprehensive records of these ‘crimes’ in China. Censorship makes finding information on such cases a challenge, and the risks associated with creating a database like Wang’s are a deterrent for most.”

The Verge: Malaysian news site fined $124,000 for five reader comments

The Verge: Malaysian news site fined $124,000 for five reader comments. “A Malaysian news site was fined the equivalent of nearly $124,000 for five comments below an article. News outlet Malaysiakini has raised money to cover the fee of 500,000 ringgit, but human rights advocates say it was targeted for its reporting on government corruption, and they worry that the case could chill political speech online.” 500,000 ringgit is a little over $123,000 USD.

New York Times: China Punishes Those Who Question ‘Martyrs.’ A Sleuth Keeps Track.

New York Times: China Punishes Those Who Question ‘Martyrs.’ A Sleuth Keeps Track.. “At least seven people over the past week have been threatened, detained or arrested after casting doubt over the government’s account of the deaths of Chinese soldiers during a clash last year with Indian troops. Three of them are being detained for between seven and 15 days. The other four face criminal charges, including one man who lives outside China…. Their punishment might have gone unnoticed if it weren’t for an online database of speech crimes in China.”

Grand Forks Herald: North Dakota House approves bill targeting social media companies for censorship

Grand Forks Herald: North Dakota House approves bill targeting social media companies for censorship. “The proposal would bar social media sites with more than 150 million active users from censoring North Dakotans’ posts based on race, religion or viewpoint. The bill would would also open up social media companies to civil lawsuits from residents who believe they’ve been blacklisted from the sites.”