CSUDH: Student Podcast Brings Ancient Maya to Life

CSUDH: Student Podcast Brings Ancient Maya to Life. “What’s the best way to make an ancient civilization accessible to a wide audience? Ask Jackeline and Lesli Hernandez, and they will tell you that podcasting is the key. The two sisters, who both graduated from CSUDH in May with degrees in anthropology, started the podcast ‘Uncovering the Ancient Maya’ in Spring 2022 to provide accurate, historical insights about the Maya to the general public.” The sisters started the podcast with three episodes, but it looks like other students will help it continue.

Dot LA: These Two SoCal Universities Are Working to Digitize and 3D Print Mesoamerican Artifacts

Dot LA: These Two SoCal Universities Are Working to Digitize and 3D Print Mesoamerican Artifacts. “William Cunningham’s voice is calm and patient over the phone. That sense of serenity will serve him well in the coming years as he helms the effort to digitize tens of thousands of artifacts, books and photographs, some nearly 3,000 years old, from USC’s collections of Mesoamerica as well as those at California State University Los Angeles. Cunningham, a digital imaging specialist at the University of Southern California Libraries Digital Library, will be responsible manning the camera and rig to capture a sprawling collection of artifacts and rare books such as recreations of Aztec codices copied directly from the original sources and a 16th-century edition of the ‘Cronica Mexicana’ by Hernando de Alvarado Tezozómoc, a writer and direct descendant of Aztec emperors.”

Climate Home News: Hit by hurricanes and Covid, more Central Americans go hungry and plan to migrate

Climate Home News: Hit by hurricanes and Covid, more Central Americans go hungry and plan to migrate. “Hurricanes and the coronavirus pandemic have contributed to a huge rise in the number of people going hungry in four Central American nations, leading many to make plans to migrate. A UN World Food Programme study (WFP) found that nearly eight million people are hungry in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua.”

Language Magazine: Nahuatl Folktales Translated into English

Language Magazine: Nahuatl Folktales Translated into English. “The Latino Book Review has released a free online archive of English translations of Nahuatl folktales. The stories were translated to English from the native Nahuatl folktales collected by Pablo González Casanova in Cuentos Indígenas, which was published by the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). Cuentos Indígenas, which was originally published in 1946, features Nahuatl folktales translated into Spanish.”

Houston Chronicle: MFAH unveils new Latin art resources

Houston Chronicle: MFAH unveils new Latin art resources. “The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and its research institute, the International Center for the Arts of the Americas (ICAA), have launched an expanded, redesigned website and database for its Documents of Latin American and Latino Art Digital Archive Project. Begun 20 years ago, the project now offers full, free access to more than 8,200 letters, manifestos, newspaper and journal articles, exhibition reviews and other key theoretical, critical and art-historical texts. The materials include significant writings by artists, critics and curators from Mexico, Central and South America, the Caribbean and the U.S. Latino communities — many now available for the first time, via a more user friendly platform.”

Google Blog: Explore the Maya world with the British Museum

Google Blog: Explore the Maya world with the British Museum. “This project has fully digitized the remarkable collection of ancient Maya art and architecture gathered by Alfred Maudslay in the late 19th century. Maudslay used the latest technology of his time to record the stories of ancient Maya cities in Mexico, Guatemala and Honduras. He developed the first dry glass plate photographs of iconic sites like Palenque, Chichen Itza and Tikal, spending years living and working throughout the region. He also created more than 400 large plaster cast replicas of building facades and monuments, which have been stored in the British Museum for more than 100 years.”

WOLA: New Online Database by WOLA Tracks U.S. Assistance to Central America

WOLA: New Online Database by WOLA Tracks U.S. Assistance to Central America. “Today, the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA), a leading advocacy and research organization, is launching a database tracking U.S. assistance to Central America. This searchable database is designed to help journalists, policymakers, and citizens gain a clearer understanding about where U.S. aid to Central America is going and what kinds of programs it’s supporting. It aims to make it easier to monitor and understand how the United States is implementing the U.S. Strategy for Central America, a multi-year plan launched in 2015 to help address the root causes of migration. Users can search for U.S. programs by year, category, recipient country, and funding account.”

Science Magazine: An integrated assessment of the vascular plant species of the Americas

Science Magazine: An integrated assessment of the vascular plant species of the Americas. “The cataloging of the vascular plants of the Americas has a centuries-long history, but it is only in recent decades that an overview of the entire flora has become possible. We present an integrated assessment of all known native species of vascular plants in the Americas. Twelve regional and national checklists, prepared over the past 25 years and including two large ongoing flora projects, were merged into a single list. Our publicly searchable checklist includes 124,993 species, 6227 genera, and 355 families, which correspond to 33% of the 383,671 vascular plant species known worldwide. In the past 25 years, the rate at which new species descriptions are added has averaged 744 annually for the Americas, and we can expect the total to reach about 150,000.”

Google Blog: The British Museum and Google Arts & Culture: Decoding the secrets of the ancient Maya

Google Blog: The British Museum and Google Arts & Culture: Decoding the secrets of the ancient Maya. “In the 19th century, the explorer Alfred Maudslay set out to capture and preserve the stories the Maya of Central America, one of the largest and most successful indigenous cultures in the world, with more than 2000 years of rich and vibrant history. For decades, he travelled through the region carrying tons of equipment on mule trains through the jungle and created the first glass plate photographs and plaster casts of some of the most important ancient Maya art from the region. More than 100 years later, Google Arts & Culture and the British Museum are picking up where Maudslay left off. Now, visitors from around the world can explore the Maya’s rich heritage online and learn about their achievements in art, architecture, astronomy, mathematics and language.”

Now Available: Database of Mesoamerican Ethnobotany

Now available: the Mesoamerican Ethnobotanical Database. “Having already demonstrated that ancient botanical remains could be collected from lowland tropical locations during excavations of prehistoric Maya sites in Belize, the team discovered that few resources existed to identify the family, genus or species of the specimens…. ‘Over the span of four years we identified, located and scanned more than 2,500 plant vouchers [plant samples mounted on 11-by-17-inch sheets of paper] representing more than 1,300 species from 148 plant families,’ [Jon] Hageman said of the tedious process.”