The Sunday Times: Students use AI rewrite tool to beat plagiarism checks

The Sunday Times: Students use AI rewrite tool to beat plagiarism checks. “The 18th-century magnum opus by the economist Adam Smith is commonly known as The Wealth of Nations. It was when a student referred in an essay to The Abundance of Countries that his professor smelled a rat. Academics have warned that students are cheating in their essays by using artificially intelligent programs that paraphrase the work of others in a way that cannot be picked up by web tools that check for plagiarism.”

Kenya: New Portal to Curb Academic Dishonesty (AllAfrica)

AllAfrica: Kenya: New Portal to Curb Academic Dishonesty. “The pace to rid the country of fake certificates is quickly gathering momentum with 74 public universities registering to list their graduates in a central database that will lock out academic cheats. The registration exercise by the institutions to be considered as Qualifications Awarding Institutions will close on September 30.”

EurekAlert: When bots do the negotiating, humans more likely to engage in deceptive techniques

EurekAlert: When bots do the negotiating, humans more likely to engage in deceptive techniques. “Recently computer scientists at USC Institute of Technologies (ICT) set out to assess under what conditions humans would employ deceptive negotiating tactics. Through a series of studies, they found that whether humans would embrace a range of deceptive and sneaky techniques was dependent both on the humans’ prior negotiating experience in negotiating as well as whether virtual agents where employed to negotiate on their behalf.”

New Zealand Herald: Woman exposes Tinder date’s double life using X-rated pic and Google

New Zealand Herald: Woman exposes Tinder date’s double life using X-rated pic and Google. “It can be difficult to tell the Romeos from the love rats when it comes to online dating but one woman managed to expose her date’s double life using two simple tools — a d**k pic and Google.” When I first started reading this story I was worried that she had done some kind of reverse image search with the picture. Not the case, and an interesting story about researching with all the evidence at your disposal.

ESPN: How the internet helped crack the Astros’ sign-stealing case

ESPN: How the internet helped crack the Astros’ sign-stealing case. “During MLB’s three-month investigation, the public scrutiny was unprecedented, a baseball scandal — itself about technology — unfolding in real time, with more incriminating evidence seemingly uncovered on Twitter by the hour. Not just fans and journalists but players — and league officials — noticed. The internet’s social media sleuthing skills played a crucial role in shaping the investigation, dramatically reducing the time the league needed to comb through video for evidence, league sources tell ESPN. While the activity online shot a jolt of adrenaline into the baseball fan community, it was also helping to shape MLB’s first uniquely 21st century scandal.”

The Verge: Justin Bieber told fans to game Spotify and iTunes to give him a chart-topping song

The Verge: Justin Bieber told fans to game Spotify and iTunes to give him a chart-topping song. “Last night, several people noticed that Justin Bieber reposted a fan’s guide to his Instagram that detailed how to game various platforms in order to boost his new single ‘Yummy.’ It’s unclear if the post was created by Bieber himself or someone on his team, but it has since been deleted.”

WCET Frontiers: Research Dispels Myth that Adult Students Don’t Cheat in Online Classes

WCET Frontiers: Research Dispels Myth that Adult Students Don’t Cheat in Online Classes. “I shared the results of a study my colleagues and I conducted, examining 9 sections of a popular online course; we varied which of the four exams, all taken from the same exam pools, that were proctored and looked at the effects of proctoring and the amount of time students took to complete the tests. This controlled for teacher effects and exam difficulty effects.”

Wired: AI Is Making It Extremely Easy for Students to Cheat

Wired: AI Is Making It Extremely Easy for Students to Cheat. “Denise Garcia knows that her students sometimes cheat, but the situation she unearthed in February seemed different. A math teacher in West Hartford, Connecticut, Garcia had accidentally included an advanced equation in a problem set for her AP Calculus class. Yet somehow a handful of students in the 15-person class solved it correctly. Those students had also shown their work, defeating the traditional litmus test for sussing out cheating in STEM classrooms.” Good article, kinda dumb headline.

Ethiopia Blocks Social Media To Prevent Cheating

This is turning into a regular thing. The latest country to block social media (to prevent cheating on exams) is Ethiopia. “Ethiopia has blocked social networking sites in the country since Saturday to prevent leakage of university entrance examination to be held next week…. Last month, questions for the top examination were posted on social networks causing a national scandal leading to the cancellation of the entire exam.”

Algeria Blocks Social Media Access In Wake of Cheating Scandal

Algeria has blocked social media in the wake of a student cheating scandal. “Almost half of students are being forced to retake the baccalaureat exam, starting on Sunday, after the initial session was marred by online leaking.” Does the notion of a country shutting down Internet / social media access to stop cheating sound familiar? Ding ding ding! This is also happening in Iraq.

Iraq Apparently Blocking Internet In Effort to Stop Cheaters

Meanwhile, Iraq is shutting down its countries Internet access periodically, apparently to stop students from cheating. “For a few hours each morning, the Iraqi government keeps cutting off internet access—to keep students from cheating on their end-of-year exams. As reported by DYN research, which tracks internet blackouts around the world, the country’s access went almost entirely dead between 5 a.m. and 8 a.m. in the morning on Saturday, Sunday and again on Monday.”