Ars Technica: Scientists hid encryption key for Wizard of Oz text in plastic molecules

Ars Technica: Scientists hid encryption key for Wizard of Oz text in plastic molecules. “Scientists from the University of Texas at Austin sent a letter to colleagues in Massachusetts with a secret message: an encryption key to unlock a text file of L. Frank Baum’s classic novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. The twist: The encryption key was hidden in a special ink laced with polymers.”

Chemical Watch: Database reveals vast numbers of food contact chemicals not on radar

Chemical Watch: Database reveals vast numbers of food contact chemicals not on radar. “Following a systematic review process, the scientists from the Food Packaging Forum (FPF), with help from Swiss and US academics, selected information from over 1000 published studies measuring chemicals in food contact materials (FCMs) and articles, including processing equipment and tableware. The resulting database, FCCmigex, contains many food contact chemicals (FCCs) for which little is known about use and migration into foods.”

Press release: Big data in geochemistry for international research (University of Göttingen)

University of Göttingen: Press release: Big data in geochemistry for international research. ” Large data sets are playing an increasingly important role in solving scientific questions in geochemistry. Now the University of Göttingen has inherited GEOROC, the largest geochemical database for rocks and minerals from the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry (Mainz). The database has been revised and modernised in its structure and made available to its global users in a new form. The ‘GEOROC’ database, the largest global data collection of rock and mineral compositions, currently contains analyses from over 20,000 individual publications (the oldest dating back to 1883) from 614,000 samples. Together, these data represent almost 32 million individual analytical values.”

University of Delaware: New Atomic Data Portal

University of Delaware: New Atomic Data Portal. “Even if you’re one of the most precise physicists on the planet — as University of Delaware Professor Marianna Safronova is — you still will need collaborators whose skills complement your own and make new opportunities possible. You will need someone such as UD Professor Rudolf Eigenmann, who can take that precision, add generous amounts of computer science expertise and help to make that high-value information available to any other physicist who wants it. A project led by Safronova and Eigenmann and supported by the National Science Foundation has done just that, producing a Portal for High-Precision Atomic Data and Computation that provides extraordinary information about atomic properties in user-friendly ways. It’s the periodic table on steroids and it is already drawing keen interest from researchers who need to know the nitty-gritty details of the materials they work with.”

Associated Press: Scientists decipher Marie Antoinette’s redacted love notes

Associated Press: Scientists decipher Marie Antoinette’s redacted love notes. ” ‘Not without you.’ ‘My dear friend.’ ‘You that I love.’ Marie Antoinette sent these expressions of affection — or more? — in letters to her close friend and rumored lover Axel von Fersen. Someone later used dark ink to scribble over the words, apparently to dampen the effusive, perhaps amorous, language. Scientists in France devised a new method to uncover the original writing, separating out the chemical composition of different inks used on historical documents.”

Chemical & Engineering News: EU releases database of toxic chemicals in products

Chemical & Engineering News: EU releases database of toxic chemicals in products. “The new database contains information provided by about 6,000 companies, which are required to notify [European Chemicals Agency (ECHA)] if they market products that contain ‘substances of very high concern’ at concentrations of more than 0.1% by weight. Lead compounds, found in products such as batteries, automotive parts, and crystalware, are the most common substances in the database.”

The Verge: Google is adding an interactive periodic table to search

The Verge: Google is adding an interactive periodic table to search. “I wasn’t the best chemistry student growing up, but I’ve had a lot of fun clicking on different elements and learning about things like an element’s atomic mass, melting point, and seeing a 3D model of each element, which I find particularly cool. Each element that I’ve clicked on also includes a short fact — like that thallium was used as the murder agent in an Agatha Christie novel, apparently.”

9to5 Google: Google Search adds practice problems, more step-by-step math explainers

9to5 Google: Google Search adds practice problems, more step-by-step math explainers. “Google has increasingly made Search a resource for students and others wanting to learn about various topics. The latest additions see Google Search surface practice problems, while expanding other capabilities. You’re now able to find interactive practice problems in Google Search to test your knowledge of high school math, chemistry, and physics.”

North Carolina State University: Virtual Lab Finds the Right AI Tool for Each Chemistry Problem

North Carolina State University (WOLFPACK!): Virtual Lab Finds the Right AI Tool for Each Chemistry Problem. “Having the right tool for the job makes the job a lot easier, less expensive and faster. Chemical engineering researchers have now developed a virtual laboratory that can be used to determine the artificial intelligence (AI) tools best suited for addressing various chemical synthesis challenges in flow chemistry systems.”

ChemistryWorld: Rebooted chemical safety database now hosted by CAS

ChemistryWorld: Rebooted chemical safety database now hosted by CAS. “A crowdsourced database of hazardous chemical reactions has become more accessible and scalable thanks to backing from the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) data division, CAS. The freely available Chemical Safety Library (CSL) is intended to improve awareness of potentially hazardous experiments, and was originally developed by the US non-profit Pistoia Alliance in 2017.”

Chemical & Engineering News: Database brings clarity to chemical weapons lists

Chemical & Engineering News: Database brings clarity to chemical weapons lists. “In the fight against chemical weapons, information is power. That’s why researchers are hopeful that a new database of chemical warfare agents, including tables of molecular structures and other key details, will help efforts to clamp down on these monstrous compounds (J. Chem. Inf. Model. 2020, DOI: 10.1021/acs.jcim.0c00896).”

Automatic database creation for materials discovery: Innovation from frustration (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Automatic database creation for materials discovery: Innovation from frustration. “A collaboration between the University of Cambridge and Argonne has developed a technique that generates automatic databases to support specific fields of science using AI and high-performance computing. Searching through reams of scientific literature for bits and bytes of information to support an idea or find the key to solving a specific problem has long been a tedious affair for researchers, even after the dawn of data-driven discovery.”