Associated Press: Tech tool tribe uses to save language

Associated Press: Tech tool tribe uses to save language. “By itself, being able to read smartphone home screens in Cherokee won’t be enough to safeguard the indigenous language, endangered after a long history of erasure. But it might be a step toward immersing younger tribal citizens in the language spoken by a dwindling number of their elders. That’s the hope of Principal Chief Richard Sneed of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, who is counting on more inclusive consumer technology — and the involvement of a major tech company — to help out.”

Western Carolina University: Graduate student working to translate Cherokee language from native newspaper

Western Carolina University: Graduate student working to translate Cherokee language from native newspaper. “Constance Owl’s master’s degree thesis is more than a means to a graduate degree in American history. It’s a portal to understanding, and perhaps saving, a disappearing language. Owl, a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians who grew up in Cherokee County, is a second-year graduate student at Western Carolina University. She is working with local Cherokee language speakers, Tom Belt and Wiggins Blackfox, to translate portions of the Cherokee Phoenix newspaper, published from about 1828 to 1834 by Elias Boudinot, a formally educated Cherokee.”

Cherokee Phoenix: Tribe’s Historic Registry Act proposed at remaining tribal courthouse

Cherokee Phoenix: Tribe’s Historic Registry Act proposed at remaining tribal courthouse . “Inside the restored Saline District courthouse in Delaware County, Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. announced the Cherokee Nation Historic Registry Act, a piece of legislation that provides a comprehensive framework to protect properties of historical significance to the tribe. CN officials have identified a preliminary list of 78 sites within the tribe’s jurisdiction, many not listed on the national registry.”

Tahlequah Daily Press: Natives encouraged to sign up for film database

Tahlequah Daily Press: Natives encouraged to sign up for film database. “The next big star could be discovered this weekend during the 67th Annual Cherokee National Holiday, as the Cherokee Nation Film Office is signing up actors to be included in a Native American talent and crew database for filmmakers. Jennifer Loren, CNFO senior Manager, said the agency constantly hears about Hollywood casting non-Native people for Native American roles, so they’ve devised a way to bring Natives to Hollywood.”

Smithsonian: National Museum of the American Indian Launches New Online Materials Based on Accurate and Comprehensive Native Peoples History

Smithsonian: National Museum of the American Indian Launches New Online Materials Based on Accurate and Comprehensive Native Peoples History. “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian is looking to change the narrative about American Indians in classrooms, transforming how teachers are teaching history to achieve a more inclusive, accurate and complete education. As part of its national education initiative, Native Knowledge 360 Degrees (NK360°), the National Museum of the American Indian has launched new online educational resources about the Pawnee Treaties, the Cherokee Nation Removal and the Inka Empire that will expand teachers and students’ knowledge and understanding of the contributions and experiences of Native Peoples of the Western Hemisphere.”

Mountain XPress: UNC Asheville students and faculty seek out Cherokee history

Mountain XPress: UNC Asheville students and faculty seek out Cherokee history. “Sometimes you’re asked to help plan a reunion. Rarely, if ever, does it result in a $50,000 grant. But this was the case for Trey Adcock, UNC Asheville assistant professor of interdisciplinary studies and director of the American Indian and Indigenous Studies program. An enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation, Adcock was approached last year by Eastern Band members from the community of Snowbird. As former students of the now defunct Snowbird Day School, the group hoped Adcock might assist with organizing and reaching out to fellow former classmates. Since the school’s closing in 1965, no such reunion had ever taken place…. In late February, UNCA announced that Adcock was one of seven national recipients of the White Public Engagement Fellowship. With the $50,000 grant, he and a team of students and colleagues began work on a project that […]

Rogers State University: Cherokee Nation, RSU offering Cherokee Language Classes through New Online Platform

Rogers State University: Cherokee Nation, RSU offering Cherokee Language Classes through New Online Platform. “The Cherokee Nation and Rogers State University are teaming up to connect more Cherokee Nation citizens to the Cherokee language through a new, online learning platform.” I looked at the Rogers State University class listing and I didn’t see any requirement that you had to be a member of the Nation to take the classes.

New Database for the Cherokee Language

Now available: a new database for the Cherokee language. “Cherokee Language dictionaries have been around for years, but a new website will help those who wish to put those words into use or need help with tricky verb conjugations. The site … which has been developed by staff at New Kituwah Academy, contains over 7,000 words and includes phonetic spellings as well as sentence examples and vocal recordings for correct pronunciation.”