University of Arkansas: Research Reveals Positive Impact of COVID Remote Learning on Educators’ Cultural Awareness

University of Arkansas: Research Reveals Positive Impact of COVID Remote Learning on Educators’ Cultural Awareness. “A study of the Marshallese experience during COVID-19 remote learning found that focusing first on basic and social-emotional needs and making frequent, personal connections with students and families may mitigate negative effects of school closures, especially for culturally diverse students.”

Childhood Without Other Children: A Generation Is Raised in Quarantine (New York Times)

New York Times: Childhood Without Other Children: A Generation Is Raised in Quarantine. “It is too early for published research about the effects of the pandemic lockdowns on very young children, but childhood development specialists say that most children will likely be OK because their most important relationships at this age are with parents. Still, a growing number of studies highlight the value of social interaction to brain development.”

Teaching kids to read during the coronavirus pandemic: 5 questions answered (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Teaching kids to read during the coronavirus pandemic: 5 questions answered. “Keisha Allen and Kindel Nash research how kids learn to read and prepare future teachers at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. They are also raising children of their own. Here, they answer five questions many families and teachers may have about what they are seeing with virtual learning for early childhood education.”

First Coast News: Free digital tool helps families identify early signs of learning disabilities and ADHD (FCL September 10, 2020)

First Coast News: Free digital tool helps families identify early signs of learning disabilities and ADHD (FCL September 10, 2020). “Bob Cunningham, Executive Director of learning development at Understood, and Amanda Morin, Family Advocate and mom to kids who learn differently, shared information about Take N.O.T.E. Take N.O.T.E. is a new initiative launched in partnership with the American Academy of Pediatrics that includes the first memory device designed to help families spot the signs of possible learning disabilities and ADHD. The initiative’s digital resource provides families with the tools to notice, observe and track patterns in their child’s behavior with downloadable tools.”

Route Fifty: Kids Are Missing Critical Windows for Lead Testing Due to Pandemic

Route Fifty: Kids Are Missing Critical Windows for Lead Testing Due to Pandemic. “In the Upper Midwest, Northeast and parts of the West Coast — areas with historically high rates of lead poisoning — the slide has been the most dramatic, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In states such as Michigan, Ohio and Minnesota, testing for the brain-damaging heavy metal fell by 50% or more this spring compared with 2019, health officials report.”

New York Times: I Was a Screen Time Expert. Then the Coronavirus Happened.

New York Times: I Was a Screen Time Expert. Then the Coronavirus Happened.. “Before the pandemic, I was a parenting expert. It was a cushy gig. In 2019, I boarded 34 flights. I checked into nice hotels, put on makeup and fitted jewel-toned dresses, strode onto stages large and dinky, and tried to project authoritative calm. I told worried parents about the nine signs of tech overuse, like ditching sleep for screens. I advised them to write a ‘family media contract’ and trust, but verify, their tweens’ doings online. While I was on the road, my two daughters were enjoying modest, cute little doses of Peppa Pig and Roblox, in between happily attending school, preschool, after-school activities and play dates, safe in the care of their father, grandmother and our full-time nanny. Now, like Socrates, I know better. I know that I know nothing.”

University of Texas at Dallas: Professor Helps Launch Platform for Online Developmental Psychology Studies

University of Texas at Dallas: Professor Helps Launch Platform for Online Developmental Psychology Studies. “University of Texas at Dallas psychologist Dr. Candice Mills is one of six scientists from six U.S. universities coast to coast who joined forces to launch the Children Helping Science project, which is designed to increase participation in online developmental psychology studies. Mills, an associate professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, described the website as a venue where families can view a large database of ongoing research projects from universities around the world to find studies about child development that they can do from home.”

The Conversation: Children’s use of social media is creating a new type of digital native

The Conversation: Children’s use of social media is creating a new type of digital native. “The first generation of people who have grown up using social media such as Facebook and Instagram are entering the workforce. For as long as this breed of so-called ‘digital natives’ has been alive, some academics have been arguing that using the internet from a young age would shape the way people learn, work and even think. But it is still not clear how useful this kind of generational divide actually is, or how different these young people are to ‘digital immigrants’ born in a pre-internet age. Some studies suggest what matters is not age but the level of experience and knowledge people have with a particular technology.”

Tufts Now: Teaching Kids About Nature to Save the Planet

Tufts Now: Teaching Kids About Nature to Save the Planet. “The class explores programs and methods that connect children and teens to the natural world in ways that support their development as stewards of the Earth—from forest schools, wilderness programs,environmental education, and urban gardening programs to reading programs using nature-friendly children’s books and teen protests that have captured the attention of the world. The class has also proved a catalyst for a new online venture to share that information with the wider world. Tomorrow’s Earth Stewards, an online publication, includes articles on programs and methods being used around the world to support children’s and youth’s development as earth stewards.”

Announcing a New Resource for Educators: Greater Good in Education (Greater Good Magazine, Berkeley)

Greater Good Magazine (Berkeley): Announcing a New Resource for Educators: Greater Good in Education. “GGIE offers free, research-based practices for education professionals to help cultivate not just students’ well-being, but their own, as well—and for school leaders to build positive school cultures. Distilling the strategies and practices for the social, emotional, and ethical development of students and the adults who work with them, GGIE synthesizes the top insights and best practices from science, programs, and practitioners.”

‘Pyke notte thy nostrellys’: 15th-century guide on children’s manners digitised for first time (The Guardian)

The Guardian: ‘Pyke notte thy nostrellys’: 15th-century guide on children’s manners digitised for first time. “The 15th-century conduct book, The Lytille Childrenes Lytil Boke, was intended to teach table manners. It has been put online as part of a new children’s literature website bringing together original manuscripts, interviews and drafts by authors from Lewis Carroll to Jacqueline Wilson. The medieval text is part of the British Library’s own collection, and ‘by listing all the many things that medieval children should not do, it also gives us a hint of the mischief they got up to’, said the library.”

Playbrary: A new vision of the neighborhood library (Brookings Institution)

Brookings Institution: Playbrary: A new vision of the neighborhood library. “As researchers who spearheaded the Playful Learning Landscapes initiative, we are committed to infusing public spaces with playful learning opportunities that naturally enhance children’s cognitive and social development, better equipping them with the skills needed to succeed in a changing world…. The results of this ambitious Play-and-Learn Spaces project—just published in the journal Library & Information Science Research—involved a novel collaboration between designers, community organizations, and researchers who hoped to push the envelope on how the children’s area in library spaces might be more responsive to the needs of families.”

Spectrum News: New data establishes norms for developmental milestones

Spectrum News: New data establishes norms for developmental milestones. “Children usually reach developmental milestones such as speaking and walking by a certain age. Pediatricians use these cutoffs to screen for developmental delays and autism. Few studies, however, have collected baseline data on when different children reach developmental milestones, which can vary widely. As a result, the current age cutoffs clinicians use for screening can miss children with delays.”