Coronavirus: Sesame Street launches storylines to help parents through the pandemic (Nursery World)

Nursery World: Coronavirus: Sesame Street launches storylines to help parents through the pandemic . “The three organisations have come together to launch the Parenting Partnership, which will be rolled out to address the specific needs of parents and carers worldwide. The first phase of the partnership involves newly-created Sesame Street content, available in ten languages, which address common issues, such as adapting to spending more time in the home together, and not being able to socialise with friends.”

ITALY: Online museum launches featuring life of St. John Bosco (Mission Newswire)

Mission Newswire: ITALY: Online museum launches featuring life of St. John Bosco. “Casa Don Bosco Museum, located in Turin, Italy, remains open online in compliance with the rules imposed to counter COVID-19. Visitors from all over the world can visit the virtual museum through the website. The museum provides an exhibition of the origins of the Salesian founder St. John (Don) Bosco’s educational and spiritual life.”

New York Public Library: The New York Public Library Offering “We’re Readin’ Here,” A Month of NYC-Inspired Virtual Storytimes For Kids

New York Public Library: The New York Public Library Offering “We’re Readin’ Here,” A Month of NYC-Inspired Virtual Storytimes For Kids. “This special collection of videos—launching on Tuesday, December 1 and featuring the City’s reading experts, librarians—recreates the joys of in-person storytimes, which are currently suspended because of the pandemic and are the NYPL’s most popular in-person program under typical circumstances. Each video includes at least one story, as well as literacy tips for families, songs, rhymes, crafts, and activities, all as a love letter to New York City and its resilient residents. ” This kind of makes it sound like it’s geo-restricted content, but I don’t think that’s the case.

13 News Now: Norfolk nonprofit mails thousands of free books to kids during coronavirus pandemic

13 News Now: Norfolk nonprofit mails thousands of free books to kids during coronavirus pandemic. “It’s a nonprofit aimed at promoting literacy and was recently selected by Coastal Virginia magazine as one of the top nonprofits in the area. It’s called REACH, or Reading Enriches All Children. The group’s executive director Dr. Jennifer Goff said it’s a milestone that wasn’t easy, because of the coronavirus pandemic.”

Moms: 15 Resources To Get Free Books For Kids

Moms: 15 Resources To Get Free Books For Kids. “With the winter months approaching, your child may be spending less time playing outside. Reading is a wonderful activity to encourage during this extra time indoors. If you have a reader in your household, check out these free resources to receive online or print children’s books.”

MIT Technology Review: How to talk to kids and teens about misinformation

MIT Technology Review: How to talk to kids and teens about misinformation. “Being young has never been easy, but it’s especially tough when social media, television programs, and maybe even the adults in your life often twist truth into misinformation. Here are some tips for grownups and young people alike for how to talk with someone about misinformation and make sure the information you’re getting and sharing is true.”

University of Reading: New Free Resources Launched To Help Children Eat More Vegetables

University of Reading: New Free Resources Launched To Help Children Eat More Vegetables. “The See & Eat project, funded by European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT) Food, has launched a new website, featuring a range of evidence-based activities and 24 eBooks in multiple languages for parents across Europe.” I didn’t download the app used to read the books, but I explored the site and book previews with no restrictions.

MarketWatch: YouTube kid influencers are marketing junk food from McDonald’s, Coke and others to children

MarketWatch: YouTube kid influencers are marketing junk food from McDonald’s, Coke and others to children. “Kid influencers are marketing junk food and sugary drinks to billions of viewers through product placement, a new study published in the journal Pediatrics found. Researchers analyzed 418 YouTube videos from the five most-watched kid influencers on the platform in 2019 and found that of the 179 videos that featured food or drinks, about 90% promoted unhealthy branded items like fast food.”

New York Times: At 12, She’s a Covid ‘Long Hauler’

New York Times: At 12, She’s a Covid ‘Long Hauler’. “More than seven months into the coronavirus pandemic, it has become increasingly apparent that many patients with both severe and mild illness do not fully recover. Weeks and months after exposure, these Covid ‘long-haulers,’ as they have been called, continue experiencing a range of symptoms, including exhaustion, dizziness, shortness of breath and cognitive impairments. Children are generally at significantly less risk than older people for serious complications and death from Covid-19, but the long-term impacts of infection on them, if any, have been especially unclear.”

MIT Technology Review: Live facial recognition is tracking kids suspected of being criminals

MIT Technology Review: Live facial recognition is tracking kids suspected of being criminals. “In a national database in Argentina, tens of thousands of entries detail the names, birthdays, and national IDs of people suspected of crimes. The database, known as the Consulta Nacional de Rebeldías y Capturas (National Register of Fugitives and Arrests), or CONARC, began in 2009 as a part of an effort to improve law enforcement for serious crimes. But there are several things off about CONARC. For one, it’s a plain-text spreadsheet file without password protection, which can be readily found via Google Search and downloaded by anyone.”

BBC: EU investigates Instagram over handling of children’s data

BBC: EU investigates Instagram over handling of children’s data. “Instagram is being investigated by Ireland’s Data Protection Commissioner (DPC) over its handling of children’s personal data on the platform. The social media app’s owner Facebook could face a large fine if Instagram is found to have broken privacy laws.”

Coronavirus: Few cases so far as Bay Area kids return to classrooms (The Mercury News)

The Mercury News: Coronavirus: Few cases so far as Bay Area kids return to classrooms. “They’re masked, disinfected and distanced — with encouraging results so far. California’s K-12 school children have been returning to the classroom this month, and so far state public health officials report ‘no significant increases in COVID-19 cases.’ That’s noteworthy, officials say, considering the number of schools resuming in-person instruction and relevant levels of community transmission.”

ProPublica Illinois: Illinois Has Had COVID-19 Outbreaks in 44 Schools but Won’t Say Where They’ve Occurred

ProPublica Illinois: Illinois Has Had COVID-19 Outbreaks in 44 Schools but Won’t Say Where They’ve Occurred. “More children are testing positive for COVID-19 than they were between March and mid-August, when schools shut down. As parents weigh the safety of in-person learning, Illinois has not published information about the virus’s spread in schools.”

Morning Consult: Millennials Were Already Putting Off Having Children. Then the Pandemic Hit.

Morning Consult: Millennials Were Already Putting Off Having Children. Then the Pandemic Hit.. “According to a new Morning Consult survey, 17 percent of 572 millennials (those ages 24 to 39) who don’t have children said they would further delay having them because of the pandemic, and 15 percent said they are less interested in having children at all because of COVID-19. Only 7 percent of this group said they are more interested in having children due to the pandemic.”

ScienceBlog: Why Writing By Hand Makes Kids Smarter

ScienceBlog: Why Writing By Hand Makes Kids Smarter. “Professor Audrey van der Meer at NTNU believes that national guidelines should be put into place to ensure that children receive at least a minimum of handwriting training. Results from several studies have shown that both children and adults learn more and remember better when writing by hand. Now another study confirms the same: choosing handwriting over keyboard use yields the best learning and memory.”