Racked: The Best Influencers Are Babies

Racked: The Best Influencers Are Babies . “On Saturday, March 10, at the Hotel Bel-Air, Khloé Kardashian held her baby shower. The event — designed by Mindy Weiss, the most famous party planner in the world, and Jeff Leatham, the most famous florist in the world — was an explosion of pink: Guests entered the dining room under an enormous archway of roses to a room in which thousands of flowers cascaded from the ceiling and onto a bed of bright pink balloons. Topiaries in the shape of elephants and giraffes towered nearby. A neon sign had been constructed in Kris Jenner’s exact handwriting. Invitees included beauty moguls and supermodels and more than one Real Housewife. All in all, the baby shower was a fairly standard Kardashian-caliber event for such a momentous occasion in every way but one: It was sponsored by Amazon.”

How to Tell If That Online Fundraiser Will Actually Help Immigrant Children at the Border

Motherboard: How to Tell If That Online Fundraiser Will Actually Help Immigrant Children at the Border. “As we’ve all become increasingly aware of the thousands of migrant children separated from their families and detained at the US border, many people have understandably had the urge to try to help. But how can you be sure that online campaign you’re clicking ‘donate’ on is legitimate?”

Yellin Center: Pediatrician Screening for Social Media Use Urged

Yellin Center: Pediatrician Screening for Social Media Use Urged. “In the latest issue of the journal Pediatrics, a team from the Baylor School of Medicine has proposed expanding the guidelines for adolescent health screenings to include questions about social media use. The proposal is based on data that finds teen social use resembles the patterns of substance addiction, with usage increasing over time from an average of 16 minutes a day between ages 10 and 12 to an average of 71 minutes a day during adolescence. Teenage girls report the highest usage, some 142 minutes per day on average. Anxiety during periods of withdrawal increase with age and usage, with 80 percent of college students indicating that they feel anxious when they are not able to access their devices, the authors report.”

BBC News: Children exposed to horror film ads on YouTube

BBC News: Children exposed to horror film ads on YouTube. “Children were left distressed after seeing ads for a horror film on YouTube, the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has revealed. Three parents contacted the ASA after their children saw ads for Insidious: The Last Key – rated 15 in the UK. One ad for the film was shown before videos of songs from Frozen, instructions for building a Lego fire station and a clip from the cartoon PJ Masks.”

Youth Today: Every State’s Extended Foster Care Policies Now Available in New Database

Youth Today: Every State’s Extended Foster Care Policies Now Available in New Database. “The Juvenile Law Center released a new tool today that could help policymakers and advocates better understand and serve older youth — those over 18 — who are aging out of foster care. The National Extended Foster Care Review is a comprehensive database that catalogues each state’s laws and policies related to extended foster care.”

Google Blog: More tools for homeschoolers

Google Blog: More tools for homeschoolers . “Our goal at Google is to make technology that works for everyone. Last year we made Classroom available to more students and teachers, including homeschoolers, and today we’re also updating the eligibility guidelines for G Suite for Education so homeschool co-ops in the U.S. can collaborate using G Suite for Education. We’ve worked closely with several organizations to make this happen, including National Black Home Educators and Home School Legal Defense Association. Today’s guest author Darren Jones shares more about why this matters.”

EurekAlert: Research highlights the influence social media marketing has on children’s food intake

EurekAlert: Research highlights the influence social media marketing has on children’s food intake . “New research from the University of Liverpool, presented at the European Congress on Obesity today (Wednesday, 23 May), highlights the negative influence that social media has on children’s food intake. Current research shows celebrity endorsement and television advertising of unhealthy foods increases children’s intake of these foods. However, children are increasingly exposed to marketing through digital avenues, such as on social media, and the impact of marketing by YouTube video bloggers (vloggers) on these outcomes has, until now, not been known.”