Slate: Beware the Cuteness Economy

Slate: Beware the Cuteness Economy. “In the recent BuzzFeed piece about Instagram-famous preschooler Mila Stauffer, Mila’s mother Katie defends her full-time job positioning her kid as a social media star against critics who wonder whether Mila has to spend too much of her time making videos. But none of the reasonable critiques aired in that piece quite define my own uneasiness. Even if Mila herself is happy as a clam, the selling of cute kids online is bad news for our relationships with real children.”

Wired: Facebook Funded Most Of The Experts Who Vetted Messenger Kids

Wired: Facebook Funded Most Of The Experts Who Vetted Messenger Kids. “IN DECEMBER, WHEN Facebook launched Messenger Kids, an app for preteens and children as young as 6, the company stressed that it had worked closely with leading experts in order to safeguard younger users. What Facebook didn’t say is that many of those experts had received funding from Facebook.”

Phys .org: The benefits of social media for young people in care

Phys.org: The benefits of social media for young people in care . “Young people in care benefit from the psychological, emotional and social support gained via social media networks – according to new research from the University of East Anglia’s Centre for Research on the Child and Family (CRCF). Until now, the automatic assumption has been that platforms such as Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp only pose a risk for this vulnerable group.” I believe in this case “in care” would be what the United States would refer to as “foster care” – at least one aspect of it. You can get more information here.

Vanderbilt: New database to help children who are deaf or hard of hearing

Vanderbilt: New database to help children who are deaf or hard of hearing. “The multi-center study, called LSL-DR for Listening and Spoken Language Data Repository, is overseen by Tamala Bradham, DHA, PhD, a quality and safety adviser in VUMC’s Center for Quality, Safety and Risk Prevention. Educators, hearing healthcare providers and researchers will be able to use the database to assess educational, speech and language outcomes in children who are deaf or hard of hearing, with the goal of having comparable speech and language skills as their typical-hearing peers, she said.”

Child experts: Just say ‘no’ to Facebook’s kids app (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Child experts: Just say ‘no’ to Facebook’s kids app. “Child development experts and advocates are urging Facebook to pull the plug on its new messaging app aimed at kids. A group letter sent Tuesday to CEO Mark Zuckerberg argues that younger children—the app is intended for those under 13—aren’t ready to have social media accounts, navigate the complexities of online relationships or protect their own privacy.”

Minnesota Autism Resource website now available – Crowdsourcing allows contributed content (Echo Journal)

Echo Journal: Minnesota Autism Resource website now available – Crowdsourcing allows contributed content. “The Minnesota Autism Resource website is now available for youth and adults with autism as well as parents, teachers, social service and health care professionals and others to get and share information about autism spectrum disorders and related conditions (ASD).”

Child Nutrition Goes Digital: Food and Nutrition Service Launches First Food Buying Guide Mobile App (USDA)

USDA: Child Nutrition Goes Digital: Food and Nutrition Service Launches First Food Buying Guide Mobile App. “The FBG is the essential resource for food yield information for all child nutrition programs, including the National School Lunch Program, School Breakfast Program, Summer Food Service Program, and the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Yield information helps operators know how much food to purchase and how that food will contribute to the meal pattern requirements to ensure that children are getting proper nutrition through the programs. Program operators can also use the FBG Mobile App on-the-go to make quick purchasing decisions from mobile devices. The new app includes food yield search, comparison, and navigation features for more than 2,100 foods typically served in child nutrition program settings, and can help users create favorite foods lists.” The app is iOS only at the moment; Android will come later.