The Bejinger: Time Travel Through Beijing’s Past With This Vast Photographic Archive

New-to-me, from The Bejinger: Time Travel Through Beijing’s Past With This Vast Photographic Archive. “First conceived in 2006, the Historical Photographs of China online archive is the fruit of a large-scale project that collects, researches, digitizes, and publishes historical photographs of China. The images largely come from private collections held outside of mainland China, from families with some historical link to the country, and many photographs having been handed down through the generations. There are thousands and thousands of images in the collection, with some of the earliest going back to the late 19th century, offering a fascinating glimpse into China’s past.”

Yale Daily News: Professor contributes to new Mao China project

Yale Daily News: Professor contributes to new Mao China project. “Mundane objects — from cutlery to wall decorations — form an integral part of everyday life, according to assistant history professor Denise Ho, who used this basic principle to co-advise an online exhibit about Mao-era China. The ‘Mao Era in Objects’ project, spearheaded by professor Jen Altehenger from the University of Oxford, compiled information and photographs regarding 24 objects from Mao-era China.” Another article with no URL I can find. The resource is at https://maoeraobjects.ac.uk/ .

Smithsonian Magazine: China’s Art, From Museum Exhibits to Rock Concerts, Moves Online During Coronavirus Outbreak

Smithsonian Magazine: China’s Art, From Museum Exhibits to Rock Concerts, Moves Online During Coronavirus Outbreak. “In January, the Chinese government issued a letter directing museums to ‘enrich the people’s spiritual and cultural life during the epidemic [with] cloud exhibitions’ that display previously planned gallery programming, reports Caroline Goldstein for artnet News. At that point, two museum openings in China had been postponed, and Hong Kong had closed all public institutions. Now, sites including the Chongqing China Three Gorges Museum, the Chongqing Natural History Museum and the National Museum in Beijing have all opted to increase their digital offerings.”

University of Wisconsin-Madison: Research looks at how Snapchat filters affect self-image

University of Wisconsin-Madison: Research looks at how Snapchat filters affect self-image. “While observing heavy use of selfie apps such as Snapchat, graduate student Amy Niu found herself wondering about the effects that virtual makeovers have on college-age females. Apps such as Snapchat and others offer users photographic filters that change their look. In China, where Niu is originally from, apps similar to this are used even more heavily than they are in the United States.”

China Daily: Palace Museum unveils digital products for cultural promotion

China Daily: Palace Museum unveils digital products for cultural promotion. “The Palace Museum has unveiled a number of upgraded and newly developed digital products to promote the rich history and culture it represents. In the museum’s upgraded ‘digital cultural relic storage’, a large number of high-resolution images of cultural relics were added to its database, which already contained detailed information on 1.86 million cultural relics from the museum’s collection.”

Blue Mountain Eagle: Grant will help archive Kam Wah Chung documents

Blue Mountain Eagle: Grant will help archive Kam Wah Chung documents . “The Oregon College of Oriental Medicine in Portland has been awarded a $39,610 grant by the State Library of Oregon to support a collaborative project between the college and the historic site called ‘Kam Wah Chung: A Historical Archive of Chinese Medicine in Rural Oregon.'”

Xinhua: China launches online database on camellia varieties

Xinhua: China launches online database on camellia varieties. “The database has more than 45,000 names and 33,000 pictures of camellia varieties including ornamental, tea and oil species. Users can search the name of camellia varieties in different languages including English, Chinese and Japanese.” Unfortunately the story does not have a link to the database, which is here: http://camellia.iflora.cn/ .

Library of Congress: Centuries of Rare Chinese Books Now Online at the Library of Congress

Library of Congress: Centuries of Rare Chinese Books Now Online at the Library of Congress. “In celebration of Asian Pacific American Heritage month, the Library of Congress has digitized and made available online 1,000 Chinese rare books produced before 1796. The Chinese Rare Book Digital Collection includes the most valuable titles and editions housed in the Library’s Asian Division, some of which date as far back as the 10th century and are the only extant copies in the world.”

China Focus: Digital technologies preserve cultural heritage in China (Xinhua)

Xinhua: China Focus: Digital technologies preserve cultural heritage in China. “Researchers are using 3D scanners to collect data about the size, color and structure of the Nanchan Temple on Wutai Mountain in northern China’s Shanxi Province. They plan to create a digital archive for the temple, which is the oldest extant wooden building from the Tang Dynasty (618-907) in China.”

Xinhua Net: Shaanxi’s digital museum attracts views from 122 countries

Xinhua Net: Shaanxi’s digital museum attracts views from 122 countries. “A digital museum in northwest China’s Shaanxi Province, home to the famous Terracotta warriors, has received more than 2 million page views from over 120 countries since its operation. The online museum digitalizes cultural relics and exhibitions of more than 140 actual museums in the province, which can be accessed by netizens across the world.”

China .org: Beijing launches website for old city protection

China .org: Beijing launches website for old city protection. “Beijing launched a new website on Dec. 17 to provide historical, cultural and geographical information of the old sites and relics in the capital. By visiting…, people can learn about Beijing at different times in history, appreciate the intangible cultural heritages, and access the memories of the city’s well-known people.” The site is in Chinese. On a scale of 1-10 for Google Translate-ability, with 10 being best, I’d rate it a 6. It got hung up on a couple menu pages and I had to just take a random guess.

XinhuaNet: Yunnan’s ancient inscriptions go digital

XinhuaNet: Yunnan’s ancient inscriptions go digital. “An ancient books preservation center in southwest China’s Yunnan Province is building an image database of inscription rubbings to preserve cultural resources. Inscription rubbing is the practice of creating an image based on stone inscriptions on paper. The image records features such as natural textures, inscribed patterns or engraved lettering.”

Google Blog: Brush up on Chinese modern art with Google Arts & Culture

Google Blog: Brush up on Chinese modern art with Google Arts & Culture. “For the last century, the Central Academy of Fine Arts (CAFA) in Beijing has been the preeminent school of art education in China. Some of the most renowned masters of Chinese modern art trained at this hallowed institution and many of their works are stored in the CAFA Art Museum. For CAFA’s 100th anniversary, Google Arts & Culture is taking the masterpieces in its museum to the world, for a new generation of art aficionados to enjoy.”