Shine (China): A Silk Road journey from antiquity to today

Shine (China): A Silk Road journey from antiquity to today. “The annual Silk Road Week will run from June 19 to 24 at the China National Silk Museum, offering professionals the opportunity to share their Silk Road stories and the latest research…. On June 18, the museum will launch the Silk Road Online Museum, a digital platform partnering with 40 museums from home and abroad. The digital museum will greatly expand the space for exhibits at the brick-and-mortar museum and build a bridge for sharing collections and hosting online exhibitions.”

China .org: Digitization helps to build online library of historical tomes

China .org: Digitization helps to build online library of historical tomes. “For the 26th World Book and Copyright Day last week, 10 Chinese libraries jointly released the digitized editions of over 1,700 volumes of ancient Chinese books. This is the fourth expansion of the national database of ancient Chinese books since it went online in 2016. The database was launched by the National Center for Preservation and Conservation of Ancient Books, headquartered at the National Library of China in Beijing.”

Shine: Weaving new life into Dunhuang’s ancient artwork

Shine: Weaving new life into Dunhuang’s ancient artwork. “Along with renowned murals, a number of silk paintings and textiles were buried in the grottoes throughout history. These fragile textiles were gradually brought to light in recent decades but required professional restoration. This month, the Dunhuang Academy signed an agreement with the China National Silk Museum, the nation’s largest silk history research organization, to participate in the restoration process and conduct research on unearthed silk antiques.”

Hong Kong Free Press: Activist sets up online archive to highlight ‘political’ editing of Hong Kong school textbooks

Hong Kong Free Press: Activist sets up online archive to highlight ‘political’ editing of Hong Kong school textbooks. “A pro-democracy activist and his newly-founded group Education Breakthrough have set up an online archive dedicated to highlighting what they describe as politically motivated changes to Hong Kong school textbooks aimed at showing China in a better light.”

South China Morning Post: Biggest photo archive of 19th century China needs a new custodian, says US collector who amassed the 20,000-plus images

South China Morning Post: Biggest photo archive of 19th century China needs a new custodian, says US collector who amassed the 20,000-plus images. “A woman wearing jade bracelets, her hair pulled back into a shiny bun, appears to rest a moment against a table…. Another shows a street scene in a narrow alleyway. Figures peer out from behind an array of commercial signs for shops, offering everything from tea, noodles and dim sum to paper products, stone tortoises and floor bricks.”

Xinhua: Digitalization used to bring back Dunhuang’s cultural relics

Xinhua: Digitalization used to bring back Dunhuang’s cultural relics. “Chinese researchers plan to digitalize cultural relics that were taken overseas from the famed Mogao Grottoes more than a century ago. The relics excavated from the Library Cave in Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes will be digitalized, Luo Huaqing, deputy director of the Dunhuang Academy, said at an academic conference on Saturday.”

Boston University Today: BU Spearheads Massive Database of Centuries of Culture-Sharing between the West and China

Boston University Today: BU Spearheads Massive Database of Centuries of Culture-Sharing between the West and China. “The China Historical Christian Database, based at the School of Theology’s Center for Global Christianity & Mission and being built by researchers there and at CAS, gets granular: it will feature maps and other resources showing where Christian churches, schools, hospitals, orphanages, and publishing houses were located in China, how long they operated, and who worked in them.”

KrAsia: [Tuning In] Peter Bol on creating the China Biological Database and the power of digital humanities

New-to-me, from KrAsia: [Tuning In] Peter Bol on creating the China Biological Database and the power of digital humanities . “Professor Bol directs the China Biographical Database project, which is maintained by Harvard University, Academia Sinica, and Peking University. This online relational database currently contains some 350,000 historical figures and is being expanded to include all biographical data in China’s historical records from the last 2,000 years.”

Tohoku University: Digitized Works from Kokichi Kano Collection Now Open to General Public

Tohoku University: Digitized Works from Kokichi Kano Collection Now Open to General Public. “The Kano Collection was brought to Tohoku University through the efforts of Masataro Sawayanagi, the university’s first president and Kano’s close friend. It consists of about 108,000 books, most of which are Japanese and Chinese classics covering a variety of fields such as literature, philosophy, science, art and the military.” 232 works have been digitized and are now available online.

Global Times: Chinese museum launches digital protection for nearly 50 Ming Dynasty costume items

Global Times: Chinese museum launches digital protection for nearly 50 Ming Dynasty costume items . “Shan Dong Museum in East China’s Shandong Province launched digital protection for nearly 50 items of ancient costumes of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), filling the gap of digital collection of cultural relics. The museum’s staff will collect textures of costumes from hundreds of years ago and complete the work of modeling these costumes, according to a report by China News Service on Wednesday.”

Nikkei Asian Review: Tiananmen museum seeks funds to preserve crackdown relics online

Nikkei Asian Review: Tiananmen museum seeks funds to preserve crackdown relics online. “The operators of the world’s only museum dedicated to preserving the memory of the June 4, 1989 Tiananmen crackdown have begun a global crowdfunding drive to take their collection online, prodded by the looming national security law Beijing plans to impose in Hong Kong.”

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: First database on the Imjin War now available

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: First database on the Imjin War now available. “The database covers a wide range of aspects of the Imjin War, such as information on prisoners, pottery produced during that period, Christianity, international relations, economics, the environment, Europe, identities, literature, military history, migrations, social history and trade. It allows analysing the human aspect of war, given that tens of thousands of Koreans were captured and sold to Japan as slaves, and many Japanese soldiers fell into the hands of the Chinese army and never returned to their country of origin. The project examines the trajectory of these people and how they were integrated into their new societies.”

The Bejinger: Time Travel Through Beijing’s Past With This Vast Photographic Archive

New-to-me, from The Bejinger: Time Travel Through Beijing’s Past With This Vast Photographic Archive. “First conceived in 2006, the Historical Photographs of China online archive is the fruit of a large-scale project that collects, researches, digitizes, and publishes historical photographs of China. The images largely come from private collections held outside of mainland China, from families with some historical link to the country, and many photographs having been handed down through the generations. There are thousands and thousands of images in the collection, with some of the earliest going back to the late 19th century, offering a fascinating glimpse into China’s past.”