South China Morning Post: Japanese wartime photos strike a nerve in China

South China Morning Post: Japanese wartime photos strike a nerve in China. “The release online of 35,000 photographs taken during the Japanese occupation of China between 1936 and 1945 has riled Chinese social media commenters.” I can’t find a link to the photography collection or much other news about it. The collection purportedly came from Kyoto University; I can’t find any announcements on its Web site but I have contacted the site and will update if I get any information.

China .org: Beijing launches website for old city protection

China .org: Beijing launches website for old city protection. “Beijing launched a new website on Dec. 17 to provide historical, cultural and geographical information of the old sites and relics in the capital. By visiting…, people can learn about Beijing at different times in history, appreciate the intangible cultural heritages, and access the memories of the city’s well-known people.” The site is in Chinese. On a scale of 1-10 for Google Translate-ability, with 10 being best, I’d rate it a 6. It got hung up on a couple menu pages and I had to just take a random guess.

XinhuaNet: Yunnan’s ancient inscriptions go digital

XinhuaNet: Yunnan’s ancient inscriptions go digital. “An ancient books preservation center in southwest China’s Yunnan Province is building an image database of inscription rubbings to preserve cultural resources. Inscription rubbing is the practice of creating an image based on stone inscriptions on paper. The image records features such as natural textures, inscribed patterns or engraved lettering.”

Global Times: Bibliothèque nationale de France donates digital versions of Dunhuang manuscripts to National Digital Library of China

Global Times: Bibliothèque nationale de France donates digital versions of Dunhuang manuscripts to National Digital Library of China. “More than 5,300 digital copies of historical documents and more than 13,000 pictures related to the ancient grottoes in Dunhuang, Gansu Province, are now available on the website of the National Digital Library of China. After signing up, visitors can search and go through all these sources by simply clicking on the ancient books button. “

British Library: Introducing the Lotus Sutra Project

British Library: Introducing the Lotus Sutra Project. “The Lotus Sūtra, whose earliest known Sanskrit title is the Saddharma Puṇḍarīka Sūtra and means ‘Sūtra on the White Lotus of the Sublime Dharma,’ was possibly composed between the first century BCE and the second century CE. It is thought to contain the Buddha’s final teaching, complete and sufficient for salvation…. If a few have already been digitised and are now accessible via the International Dunhuang Project (IDP) website, a large proportion has remained practically untouched since their discovery in 1907 and is currently unavailable online. Thanks to a generous grant from the Bei Shan Tang Foundation, in Hong Kong, work is now underway to address this issue. The aim of this four-year project is to conserve and digitise nearly 800 copies of the Lotus Sūtra in Chinese, with a view to make images and information about them freely accessible on the Internet.”