The Parallax: Meet WeChat, the app that’s ‘everything’ in China

The Parallax: Meet WeChat, the app that’s ‘everything’ in China. “It takes just six characters to spell ‘everything’ in China, and Mandarin fluency isn’t required. The far-more-than-messaging app WeChat dominates the mobile Web here. That’s been very good for WeChat developer Tencent Holdings, which in March revealed that this iOS and Android app, which has made online and real-world commerce vastly easier in China, had attracted more than a billion users. But Tencent still has to play by the Chinese government’s rules, and Western human rights advocates have found little promise in WeChat’s rise.”

Boing Boing: China has perfected the internet control playbook and now it’s exporting it to the world

Boing Boing: China has perfected the internet control playbook and now it’s exporting it to the world . “After decades of back-and-forth over internet freedom, China has figured out a method for allowing people to use the internet for social and business purposes, but not for political reform — a combination of huge boiler-rooms full of censors, centralization of internet services under tight government control, and control over standards to ensure that surveillance and censorship are always possible. At the same time, China’s increasing wealth, combined with other large powers’ increased austerity and withdrawal from foreign aid, has enabled it to create large and growing spheres of influence over other states in Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas, and these trading partners look to China for examples of how to create their own internet policies.”

Xinhuanet: Kenya hails collaboration with China to preserve cultural, natural heritage

Xinhuanet: Kenya hails collaboration with China to preserve cultural, natural heritage. “Kenya on Tuesday hailed a robust collaboration with China to promote the preservation of the East African nation’s cultural and natural heritage. Hassan Noor Hassan, Chief Administrative Secretary (CAS) at the Ministry of Sports and Heritage, said Nairobi is already benefiting from the partnership with China to help conserve the country’s rich culture and biodiversity.”

Google Blog: Brush up on Chinese modern art with Google Arts & Culture

Google Blog: Brush up on Chinese modern art with Google Arts & Culture. “For the last century, the Central Academy of Fine Arts (CAFA) in Beijing has been the preeminent school of art education in China. Some of the most renowned masters of Chinese modern art trained at this hallowed institution and many of their works are stored in the CAFA Art Museum. For CAFA’s 100th anniversary, Google Arts & Culture is taking the masterpieces in its museum to the world, for a new generation of art aficionados to enjoy.”

ECNS: China’s nationwide property database comes into effect

ECNS: China’s nationwide property database comes into effect . “China’s long-expected national property database has started to connect information stations across the country, according to Ministry of Natural Resources. There have been 3,001 property registration stations in 335 cities and 2,853 counties serving more than 300,000 enterprises and individuals averagely each day, according to latest statistics.”

Reuters: Google to invest $550 million in Chinese e-commerce giant JD. com

Reuters: Google to invest $550 million in Chinese e-commerce giant JD.com. “Google will invest $550 million in Chinese e-commerce powerhouse JD.com, part of the U.S. internet giant’s efforts to expand its presence in fast-growing Asian markets and battle rivals including Amazon.com.”

XinhuaNet: Chinese scientists establish database to improve radiotherapy

XinhuaNet: Chinese scientists establish database to improve radiotherapy. “Chinese scientists have established an online database to help improve radiotherapy efficacy and clinical treatment of cancer. The Cancer Radiosensitivity Regulation Factors Database was jointly developed by Hefei Institute of Physical Science under the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui University. It provides information on genes, drugs, as well as other regulators that affect the radiosensitivity of each specific cancer.”