Slate: Is Hong Kong the Battleground for a New Cyber Cold War?

Slate: Is Hong Kong the Battleground for a New Cyber Cold War?. ” In Hong Kong, where Beijing’s political sovereignty does not come with direct control over the internet or local police, Beijing is reluctant to active the most draconian option: deployment of the People’s Liberation Army to keep order in Hong Kong’s streets. While this could be done lawfully, it would be catastrophic—for global investor confidence, the regime’s credibility, and the assets of party elites and state-backed firms that rely on Hong Kong’s financial institutions. Instead, Beijing is exploring other options.”

Digital Trends: Apple might be sending your browsing data to China’s Tencent by default

Digital Trends: Apple might be sending your browsing data to China’s Tencent by default. “A safe browsing feature, intended to increase online security within Apple’s Safari app, has instead raised privacy concerns as it has been recently discovered that the app is sending user browsing data to a company headquartered in China.” The Verge has an update to the story with a more thorough explanation of what is really happening here.

CNBC: Superstar German DJ ‘permanently banned’ from China for liking a ‘South Park’ tweet

CNBC: Superstar German DJ ‘permanently banned’ from China for liking a ‘South Park’ tweet. “Zedd, a high-profile DJ and music producer, has been permanently banned from China for liking a tweet from ‘South Park’s’ official account. On Friday, Zedd tweeted about the ban, and CNBC verified the claim with his publicist on Saturday.”

Washington Post: Chinese app on Xi’s ideology allows data access to 100 million users’ phones, report says

Washington Post: Chinese app on Xi’s ideology allows data access to 100 million users’ phones, report says. “The Chinese Communist Party appears to have ‘superuser’ access to all the data on more than 100 million cellphones, owing to a back door in a propaganda app that the government has been promoting aggressively this year.”

South China Morning Post: Older Hongkongers taking to online apps and social media for latest updates on protests, and some may join rallies too

South China Morning Post: Older Hongkongers taking to online apps and social media for latest updates on protests, and some may join rallies too . “Retired schoolteacher Bill Lau, 66, first learned about the messaging app Telegram and online forum LIHKG – platforms popular with protesters – from his friends and younger daughter respectively. Curious, he downloaded Telegram and started checking out LIHKG links from his daughter, and now spends at least half an hour on them each day.”

CNET: Apple pulls HKmap.live app used in Hong Kong protests

CNET: Apple pulls HKmap.live app used in Hong Kong protests. “Apple has removed HKmap.live, a mapping app that crowdsources the location of police and protesters in Hong Kong, from the App Store, saying it violated the store’s guidelines and local laws. The move comes after the iPhone maker was sharply criticized by the Chinese state newspaper and accused of facilitating illegal behavior by allowing the app.”

Engadget: US government adds Chinese facial recognition firms to entity list

Engadget: US government adds Chinese facial recognition firms to entity list. “A total of 28 Chinese organizations have been added to the US government’s ‘entity list,’ including eight tech corporations that specialize in video surveillance, facial recognition and artificial intelligence. The administration has effectively prohibited them from working with and buying from suppliers in the US over human rights concerns. “