BBC: Chinese ‘cyber-court’ launched for online cases

BBC: Chinese ‘cyber-court’ launched for online cases. “China has launched a digital “cyber-court” to help deal with a rise in the number of internet-related claims, according to state media. The Hangzhou Internet Court opened on Friday and heard its first case – a copyright infringement dispute between an online writer and a web company.”

New York Times: Cambridge University Press Removes Academic Articles on Chinese Site

New York Times: Cambridge University Press Removes Academic Articles on Chinese Site. “One of the world’s oldest and most respected publishing houses, Cambridge University Press, has bowed to pressure from Beijing and removed sensitive content on its site in China. The content is published in China Quarterly, an academic journal run by the press. In a letter made public on social media on Friday, the editor of the journal, Tim Pringle, said Cambridge University Press had informed him that the authorities had ordered it to censor more than 300 articles related to issues like the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, Tibet, Xinjiang, Hong Kong and the Cultural Revolution. The publishing house’s site risked being shut down if it did not comply with the request, the letter said.”

Radio Free Asia: China Orders ‘National Security’ Probe Into Top Three Social Media Platforms

Radio Free Asia: China Orders ‘National Security’ Probe Into Top Three Social Media Platforms. “China’s powerful Cyberspace Administration said on Friday it has ordered investigations into several hugely popular social media platforms for hosting content that ‘harmed national security.’ The internet regulator said it had directed its Beijing and Guangdong branches to launch probes into content hosted by Tencent’s WeChat smartphone-based chat app, Sina’s Twitter-like Weibo service and Baidu’s Tieba forum platform.”

New York Times: In China, Facebook Tests the Waters With a Stealth App

New York Times: In China, Facebook Tests the Waters With a Stealth App. “Facebook and many of its apps have been blocked in China for years. To change that, Mark Zuckerberg has made a big point of meeting with Chinese politicians, reading stodgy Communist Party propaganda, studying Mandarin and — perhaps more daunting — speaking it in public. Now the social network is trying a different way into China: by authorizing the release of a new app there that does not carry the Facebook name.”

Sixth Tone: Chinese Academic Database Sued for Copyright Infringement

Sixth Tone: Chinese Academic Database Sued for Copyright Infringement. “A Chinese copyright society has filed suit against the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), the country’s largest online library for academic works, accusing them of violating intellectual property rights, Sixth Tone’s sister publication The Paper reported Tuesday.”

Science Magazine: China cracks down after investigation finds massive peer-review fraud

Science Magazine: China cracks down after investigation finds massive peer-review fraud. “A massive peer-review fraud has triggered a tough response from the Chinese government. Officials last week announced that more than 400 researchers listed as authors on some 100 now-retracted papers will face disciplinary action because their misconduct has seriously damaged China’s scientific reputation.”