Quartz: China’s crackdown on the country’s livestreaming craze is getting more intense

Quartz: China’s crackdown on the country’s livestreaming craze is getting more intense. “On Thursday, China’s State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television (SAPPRFT), a branch of China’s state council that oversees the media industry, published a notice (link in Chinese) that unlicensed providers of ‘audio-visual’ services must cease related activities until they obtain the required permissions. The directive singled out three internet companies, the largest of which was Weibo–the Twitter-esque social media platform, which has recently jumped on the livestreaming bandwagon to much success.”

Shanghai Daily (China): Database boosts city’s technology aim

Shanghai Daily (China): Database boosts city’s technology aim. “THE city is to set up a database of government subsided research. The idea is to allow agencies to help to pitch scientific projects and bring more resources to support projects from an early stage. The database initiative is part of an action plan to boost Shanghai’s capacity to transform scientific and technological research results into commercial initiatives, the city’s science and technology commission said yesterday.”

Radio Free Asia: China Shutters Dozens of Entertainment News Accounts in Social Media Crackdown

Radio Free Asia: China Shutters Dozens of Entertainment News Accounts in Social Media Crackdown. “China’s powerful Cyberspace Agency has shuttered around 60 social media accounts on major platforms amid a crackdown on celebrity news and gossip. The agency said the move came amid a crackdown on independent media accounts purveying celebrity photos and gossip sparked by the new cybersecurity law, which came into effect on June 1, and contains a clause stipulating that online content mustn’t breach privacy.”

South China Morning Post: Is social media bad for you? Yes, but we still love it, say Chinese

South China Morning Post: Is social media bad for you? Yes, but we still love it, say Chinese. “They could just be signs of ‘social media syndrome’ – a tendency to live your life through your online interactions – according to new research which found a growing number of China’s 700 million plus internet users recognise the potential impact on their health of extensive use of platforms such as WeChat and Weibo. But, the study shows, the mainland’s swelling army of social media addicts have no intention of quitting just yet.”

Hong Kong Free Press: Facebook apologises after ‘mistakenly’ banning 1989 Tiananmen massacre profile tribute

Hong Kong Free Press: Facebook apologises after ‘mistakenly’ banning 1989 Tiananmen massacre profile tribute. “Facebook has apologised for ‘mistakenly’ banning the use of a temporary profile picture frame commemorating the 1989 Tiananmen Square Massacre.”

PRNewswire: Hujiang EdTech Launches Online Museum Project in Copenhagen to Promote Global Cultural Exchange (PRESS RELEASE)

PRNewswire: Hujiang EdTech Launches Online Museum Project in Copenhagen to Promote Global Cultural Exchange (PRESS RELEASE). “Hujiang EdTech (‘Hujiang’), China’s leading online education company, through its interactive online teaching platform CCtalk, launched the Cultural Exchange – “Aim at the World” Museum Children’s Education Project (‘the project’) at the Frederiksborg Castle Museum in Copenhagen, Denmark. This live interactive broadcast is one of Hujiang EdTech’s initiatives to link China and the rest of the world. The company intends to introduce exhibits and other content from world class museums to children worldwide through Virtual Reality (VR) technology.”

Harvard: Analyzing Accessibility of Wikipedia Projects Around the World

Harvard: Analyzing Accessibility of Wikipedia Projects Around the World . “This study, conducted by the Internet Monitor project at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, analyzes the scope of government-sponsored censorship of Wikimedia sites around the world. The study finds that, as of June 2016, China was likely censoring the Chinese language Wikipedia project, and Thailand and Uzbekistan were likely interfering intermittently with specific language projects of Wikipedia as well.”