NYT: He Tweeted About Chinese Government Corruption. Twitter Suspended His Account.

New York Times: He Tweeted About Chinese Government Corruption. Twitter Suspended His Account.. “Twitter on Wednesday briefly suspended the account of a Chinese-born billionaire who was using the social media service to publicize allegations of corruption against top Communist Party officials.” If that headline sounds familiar it’s because the same guy was recently accidentally (allegedly) suspended from Facebook and the NYT ran a story on it with a similar headline.

VOA: China Launches Corruption Crackdown on Social Media Ahead of Party Congress

Voice of America: China Launches Corruption Crackdown on Social Media Ahead of Party Congress. “The Communist Party of China has recently warned its members of eight major “red lines” while using the popular social media platform WeChat, prohibiting behaviors like accepting or giving electronic ‘red envelopes’ to buy votes. The warning showcases the party’s resolve to fight corruption ahead of this year’s 19th party congress, which is slated to elect China’s top leaders for the next five years.”

Berkeley News: C.V. Starr East Asian Library acquires massive and rare Chinese film studies collection

Berkeley News: C.V. Starr East Asian Library acquires massive and rare Chinese film studies collection. “Paul Fonoroff has two rules when it comes to collecting. ‘You have to be passionate about it,’ he deadpans. ‘And it has to be something that no one else is interested in.’ That maxim helped the Cleveland native amass over 70,000 movie posters, periodicals, photos, lobby cards, theater flyers and other movie ephemera while he lived in Beijing and Hong Kong. Fonoroff’s massive collection — which is the largest of its kind in North America and rivals what can be found at film archives in Asia — was recently acquired by UC Berkeley’s C.V. Starr East Asian Library, opening an enormous cache to researchers and the public.”

NYT: Facebook Briefly Suspends Account of Outspoken Chinese Billionaire

New York Times: Facebook Briefly Suspends Account of Outspoken Chinese Billionaire. “Guo Wengui, a Chinese-born billionaire who lives in America, has recently publicized accusations of corruption against family members of top-ranking Chinese Communist Party officials. This week, China’s government asked Interpol to issue a request for his arrest. On Friday, Facebook suspended Mr. Guo’s account. After Mr. Guo complained publicly, Facebook said the suspension had been a mistake, and his account was restored.”

Sixth Tone: How Western Fake News Took Over China’s Social Media

Sixth Tone: How Western Fake News Took Over China’s Social Media. “While internet users in the Western world now stand a reduced chance of encountering the Daily Mail’s content, Chinese social media outlets — including microblogging site Weibo and social messaging app WeChat — are frequently abuzz with the tabloid’s stories. In fact, the social media feeds of millions of Chinese netizens are filled not only with translations of the Daily Mail’s stories, but also with a torrent of misinformation from the West’s now-ubiquitous fake news and conspiracy theory websites.”

CNBC: Western content is heading to Chinese social media feeds

CNBC: Western content is heading to Chinese social media feeds. “Chinese social media users will soon benefit from a flood of new international content entering their feeds. That’s thanks to recent tie-ups between local social media platforms and digital content distributor network Yoola to bring selected content, primarily from the United States and Russia, into the Chinese market.”

BuzzFeed: Yahoo Accused Of Mismanaging Millions That Were Meant For Humanitarian Aid

BuzzFeed: Yahoo Accused Of Mismanaging Millions That Were Meant For Humanitarian Aid. “In 2007, Yahoo agreed to pay millions of dollars to set up a foundation to aid Chinese political dissidents, after the company was accused of turning over information to the Chinese government. A lawsuit filed on Tuesday claims most of the money is gone, and little went to help imprisoned activists.”