Ars Technica: After employee revolt, Google says it is “not close” to launching search in China

Ars Technica: After employee revolt, Google says it is “not close” to launching search in China. “Google’s employees and Google’s management are clashing over ethical issues again. Just two months after Google’s ‘Project Maven’ military drone project was seemingly resolved, Google’s employees are now up in arms over company plans to create censored products for China. The internal protests resulted in the issue being addressed at an all-hands meeting, and we got to learn a bit more about Google’s China plans.”

New York Times: Google Employees Protest Secret Work on Censored Search Engine for China

New York Times: Google Employees Protest Secret Work on Censored Search Engine for China. “Hundreds of Google employees, upset at the company’s decision to secretly build a censored version of its search engine for China, have signed a letter demanding more transparency to understand the ethical consequences of their work.”

The Citizen Lab: How WeChat Filters Images For One Billion Users

The Citizen Lab: How WeChat Filters Images For One Billion Users. “With over 1 billion monthly users, WeChat boasts the title of most popular chat application in China and the fourth largest in the world. However, a new report by Citizen Lab researchers reveals exactly how the platform is able to censor images sent by these billion users.”

Smithsonian Looking for Crowdsourcing Assistance for Chinese Coin Transcription

The Smithsonian is looking for crowdsourcing assistance in transcribing some Chinese coins. From the project page: “During 2017-2018, the NNC [National Numismatic Collection] digitized more than 8,000 of its East Asian Coins, making them publically accessible and available for research worldwide. The NNC is now working to digitize 6,000 Chinese notes and paper transactional objects that range from the Ming Dynasty to the present day. One of the main challenges to the digitization process is transcription, transliteration and translation of several Asian alphabets. Sometimes this can be done quickly, but often the process is too lengthy for NNC team members to complete while moving the project forward efficiently. In order to continue to share these objects rapidly, we need your help! The 50 coins here are a pilot project that will help our team (and you!) figure out how best to make these objects available and more easily searchable online.”

Google vs Baidu: Chinese analysts split on who will be the search winner (Global Times)

Global Times: Google vs Baidu: Chinese analysts split on who will be the search winner. “Google’s possible launch of a new search engine for the Chinese mainland will encounter fierce competition from its Chinese counterpart Baidu Inc, analysts said on Tuesday. The comment came after Baidu CEO Robin Li Yanhong said on Tuesday that he is confident in his company’s ability to compete with its US counterpart Google, even as the latest news about the possible launch of a new search engine in the Chinese mainland by the giant US search engine generated buzz among Chinese netizens, with a poll showing nearly 90 percent of them prefer to use Google if its search service returns.”

New York Times: A Generation Grows Up in China Without Google, Facebook or Twitter

New York Times: A Generation Grows Up in China Without Google, Facebook or Twitter. “Wei Dilong, 18, who lives in the southern Chinese city of Liuzhou, likes basketball, hip-hop music and Hollywood superhero movies. He plans to study chemistry in Canada when he goes to college in 2020. Mr. Wei is typical of Chinese teenagers in another way, too: He has never heard of Google or Twitter. He once heard of Facebook, though. It is ‘maybe like Baidu?’ he asked one recent afternoon, referring to China’s dominant search engine.”

Bloomberg: Google Is in China Cloud Talks With Tencent, Others

Bloomberg: Google Is in China Cloud Talks With Tencent, Others. “Google wants to get back into China, and is laying the groundwork for a key part of the initiative: bringing its cloud business to the world’s second-largest economy. The internet giant is in talks with Tencent Holdings Ltd., Inspur Group and other Chinese companies to offer Google cloud services in the mainland, according to people familiar with the discussions. They asked not to be identified discussing private matters.”