New York Times: China Censors the Internet. So Why Doesn’t Russia?

New York Times: China Censors the Internet. So Why Doesn’t Russia?. “For years, the Russian government has been putting in place the technological and legal infrastructure to clamp down on freedom of speech online, leading to frequent predictions that the country could be heading toward internet censorship akin to China’s great firewall. But even as Mr. Putin faced the biggest protests in years last month, his government appeared unwilling — and, to some degree, unable — to block websites or take other drastic measures to limit the spread of digital dissent.”

The Conversation: COVID-19 misinformation on Chinese social media – lessons for countering conspiracy theories

The Conversation: COVID-19 misinformation on Chinese social media – lessons for countering conspiracy theories. “As researchers who study online media and public discourse, my colleagues and I examined conspiracy theories about the origins of COVID-19 and narratives that debunk them on Sina Weibo, the Chinese equivalent of Twitter and one of the major Chinese social media platforms. We found that popular conspiracies on Weibo about the origins of COVID-19 differ substantially from those in the U.S., with many claiming that a national government deliberately constructed the coronavirus. Conspiracy posts and posts attributing responsibility to the U.S. surged during Sino-U.S. confrontations.”

Washington Post: China rolls out anal swab coronavirus test, saying it’s more accurate than throat method

Washington Post: China rolls out anal swab coronavirus test, saying it’s more accurate than throat method. “Chinese state media outlets introduced the new protocol in recent days, prompting widespread discussion and some outrage. Some Chinese doctors say the science is there. Recovering patients, they say, have continued to test positive through samples from the lower digestive tract days after nasal and throat swabs came back negative. Yet for many, it seemed a step too far in government intrusions after a year and counting of a dignity-eroding pandemic.”

SupChina: Under lockdown, people in Jilin fear dying of hunger before coronavirus

SupChina: Under lockdown, people in Jilin fear dying of hunger before coronavirus. “It’s almost been a week since Tonghua, a small city in China’s northeastern Jilin Province, went into lockdown to fight an ongoing resurgence of new COVID-19 cases in China. But instead of the deadly virus, the city’s 300,000 have been struggling to keep hunger at bay after being sealed inside their homes.”

SupChina: Beijing gives in to pressure from public to set up special quarantine site for pet owners

SupChina: Beijing gives in to pressure from public to set up special quarantine site for pet owners. “Last week, all 1.6 million residents of Daxing were banned from leaving the city, while people living in five Daxing neighborhoods where the cases were detected were ordered to remain indoors. Over the weekend, as new infections continued to soar, Daxing’s Tiangongyuan neighborhood ordered residents to move to centralized quarantine venues. Complaints quickly emerged on social media from people who had been told to leave their pets unattended at home.”

Covid-19: Five days that shaped the outbreak (BBC)

BBC: Covid-19: Five days that shaped the outbreak. “A year ago, the Chinese government locked down the city of Wuhan. For weeks beforehand officials had maintained that the outbreak was under control – just a few dozen cases linked to a live animal market. But in fact the virus had been spreading throughout the city and around China. This is the story of five critical days early in the outbreak.”

SupChina: Beijing promotes vaccine nationalism and new COVID-19 conspiracies

SupChina: Beijing promotes vaccine nationalism and new COVID-19 conspiracies. “Ever since March 2020, when Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Zhào Lìjiān 赵立坚 suggested the U.S. Army might have ‘brought the epidemic to Wuhan,’ conspiracy theories have been part of Beijing’s arsenal, but they now appear to be gaining emphasis — and a new focus on undermining confidence in non-Chinese vaccines.”

Jalopnik: When Adobe Stopped Flash Content From Running It Also Stopped A Chinese Railroad

Jalopnik: When Adobe Stopped Flash Content From Running It Also Stopped A Chinese Railroad. “Adobe’s Flash, the web browser plug-in that powered so very many crappy games, confusing interfaces, and animated icons of the early web like Homestar Runner is now finally gone, after a long, slow, protracted death. For most of us, this just means that some goofy webgame you searched for out of misplaced nostalgia will no longer run. For a select few in China, though, the death of Flash meant being late to work, because the city of Dalian in northern China was running their railroad system on it.”

Shine: Bilingual search engine for city’s rules

Shine: Bilingual search engine for city’s rules. “A bilingual search engine for current rules and regulations in the city was launched by the city’s comprehensive law-based governance commission on Wednesday. It is the first platform of its kind in China, the commission said. The public can access over 500 documents on the platform, called ‘A Collection of Regulations and Rules of Shanghai City,’ in Chinese and English.”

The Verge: Twitter locks out China’s US embassy after ‘baby-making machines’ tweet

The Verge: Twitter locks out China’s US embassy after ‘baby-making machines’ tweet. “Twitter has locked the official account for China’s US embassy, over a tweet it said violated its policy against dehumanization, Bloomberg reports. The tweet, which was originally shared on January 7th, referred to Uighur women as ‘baby-making machines’ prior to government intervention. Twitter removed the tweet and replaced it with a notice saying it’s no longer available. However, Twitter requires account owners to manually delete tweets that violate its rules before unlocking accounts.”

TechCrunch: U.S. government appeals the injunction against its TikTok ban

TechCrunch: U.S. government appeals the injunction against its TikTok ban. “The U.S. government is appealing the ruling that blocked the Trump administration’s TikTok ban, according to a new court filing. On December 7, 2020, U.S. District Court Judge Carl Nichols in Washington became the second U.S. judge to block the Commerce Department’s attempt to stop the TikTok app from being downloaded from U.S. app stores, citing threats to national security.”