New York Times: As Virus Spreads, Anger Floods Chinese Social Media

New York Times: As Virus Spreads, Anger Floods Chinese Social Media. “Recently, someone following the coronavirus crisis through China’s official news media would see lots of footage, often set to stirring music, praising the heroism and sacrifice of health workers marching off to stricken places. But someone following the crisis through social media would see something else entirely: vitriolic comments and mocking memes about government officials, harrowing descriptions of untreated family members and images of hospital corridors loaded with patients, some of whom appear to be dead.”

New York Times: Panic and Criticism Spread on Chinese Social Media Over Coronavirus

New York Times: Panic and Criticism Spread on Chinese Social Media Over Coronavirus. “Chinese citizens are overcoming a lack of reporting on the crisis in the state-run media by sharing their own videos and information about the coronavirus outbreak.”

Science: Chinese researchers reveal draft genome of virus implicated in Wuhan pneumonia outbreak

Science: Chinese researchers reveal draft genome of virus implicated in Wuhan pneumonia outbreak. “Scientists worried about China’s lack of transparency about a month-old outbreak of pneumonia in the city of Wuhan breathed a sigh of relief today, after a consortium of researchers published a draft genome of the newly discovered coronavirus suspected of causing the outbreak.”

ZDNet: Google removes WhatsGap from app store

ZDNet: Google removes WhatsGap from app store. “Search engine giant Google has removed popular Hong Kong pro-democracy mapping app WhatsGap from its app store. WhatsGap is an app used to identify retailers that are in support of Hong Kong’s democracy. Google told ZDNet the removal of WhatsGap was sparked by ‘sensitive content’ that was being published on the app.”

The New York Times: While Shuttered at Home, China Exploits Social Media Abroad

The New York Times: While Shuttered at Home, China Exploits Social Media Abroad. “China says its diplomats and government officials will fully exploit foreign social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter that are blocked off to its own citizens.”

Techdirt: Chinese Court Says AI-Generated Content Is Subject To Copyright Protection

Techdirt: Chinese Court Says AI-Generated Content Is Subject To Copyright Protection. “Just last week we wrote about the good news that the European Patent Office had decided to reject AI-generated inventions for patent applications and explained why this was good. As we noted, prior to that, most of the discussion on AI and monopoly protections had been focused on copyright, and there are various lawyers and law firms eagerly pushing the idea that AI should be able to obtain copyrights, despite it going against the entire basis of copyright law. So far, we haven’t had a real test of the issue in the US (though the monkey selfie case could be seen as a trial balloon for copyright for non-human creators), but apparently at least one Chinese court has already gone in the other direction.”

The Register: Why is a 22GB database containing 56 million US folks’ personal details sitting on the open internet using a Chinese IP address? Seriously, why?

The Register: Why is a 22GB database containing 56 million US folks’ personal details sitting on the open internet using a Chinese IP address? Seriously, why? . “A database containing the personal details of 56.25m US residents – from names and home addresses to phone numbers and ages – has been found on the public internet, served from a computer with a Chinese IP address, bizarrely enough.”