CNET: TikTok accused of secretly gathering user data and sending it to China

CNET: TikTok accused of secretly gathering user data and sending it to China. “TikTok, known for its quirky 15-second videos, has been illegally and secretly harvesting vast amounts of personally identifiable user data and sending it to China, according to a proposed class-action lawsuit filed in California federal court last week.”

AFP: China bans ‘fake news’ created with AI, bots

AFP: China bans ‘fake news’ created with AI, bots. “The regulation published Friday by China’s cyberspace authority said that both providers and users of online video news and audio services are ‘not allowed’ to use new technologies such as deep learning and virtual reality to create, distribute and broadcast ‘fake news.'”

CNET: TikTok apologizes for removing viral video criticizing Chinese treatment of Uighur Muslim community

CNET: TikTok apologizes for removing viral video criticizing Chinese treatment of Uighur Muslim community. “TikTok has published a lengthy blog post addressing the “interest and confusion” surrounding an anti-Chinese video that went viral earlier this week. A young TikTok user had posted a makeup video while raising awareness about Uighur Muslim community being detained in China. TikTok said Wednesday it wanted to ‘clarify’ and apologize for human error in removing the video.”

The Nation: The Hong Kongers Building a Case Against the Police

The Nation: The Hong Kongers Building a Case Against the Police . “Those on Hong Kong social media—especially on Twitter and some channels on Telegram, the secure messaging app preferred by the protesters—have made a concerted effort to document and publicize police brutality. #HongKongPoliceBrutality and #HongKongPoliceTerrorism are just two of the hashtags Hong Kongers use on Twitter as they recirculate videos and graphics contextualizing the violence. These netizen-protesters see themselves as being on the front lines of the information war over Hong Kong, coordinating a PR campaign to raise awareness—and get the international attention that they see as crucial to their movement’s success.” This was a great story, but The Nation had an pop-in ad for its mailing list that was really intrusive. I could only get rid of it by reloading the page.

BBC: Teen’s TikTok video about China’s Muslim camps goes viral

BBC: Teen’s TikTok video about China’s Muslim camps goes viral. “The post appears to be about beauty tips at its start – but the young woman then changes tack to ask her viewers to raise awareness of what she describes as a ‘another Holocaust’. An associated Twitter account has since claimed TikTok then blocked Feroza Aziz from posting new content, as a result. But TikTok has disputed this.”

The Verge: WeChat keeps banning Chinese Americans for talking about Hong Kong

The Verge: WeChat keeps banning Chinese Americans for talking about Hong Kong. “Pro-democracy candidates won a landslide victory in Hong Kong yesterday, but many Chinese Americans have been unable to express their approval online. WeChat, a popular social media messaging app, has been censoring political messages and disabling people’s accounts if they voice their support for the movement — even if they’re in the United States.”

Heritage conservation in China: why ‘Daughter of Dunhuang’ devoted her life to keeping Buddhist caves and relics alive (South China Morning Post)

South China Morning Post: Heritage conservation in China: why ‘Daughter of Dunhuang’ devoted her life to keeping Buddhist caves and relics alive . “Anyone with more than an ounce of interest in Dunhuang will have heard of Fan Jinshi. Now 81, the Chinese archaeologist who has spent more than half a century researching and preserving the caves at the heart of the ancient Silk Road in Gansu province is known as the ‘Daughter of Dunhuang’ in her field, though ‘protector’ is probably a more fitting description.”