CNET: China’s censors reportedly learn real history to stop it spreading online

CNET: China’s censors reportedly learn real history to stop it spreading online. “Chinese censors must reportedly learn a history previously unknown to them so they know which information the government wants them to stop from spreading. Employees of censorship companies like the Beijing-based Beyondsoft are taught about the government’s violent suppression of the 1989 student-led Tiananmen Square protests and late activist Liu Xiaobo, who was repeatedly imprisoned for his anti-government views, The New York Times reported Wednesday.”

Daniel Miessler: It Appears China is Building a Massive Espionage Database on America

Daniel Miessler: It Appears China is Building a Massive Espionage Database on America. “I’ve mentioned this in numerous places for the last few years, so I decided it was time to finally put it into a formal piece. It seems obvious at this point that China is building a massive database of information on American individuals and companies, which they can then use for various purposes—including espionage, intellectual property theft, extortion, and other types of coercion.”

CNET: ‘Winter is coming’ for Chinese economy, warns search giant Baidu’s CEO

CNET: ‘Winter is coming’ for Chinese economy, warns search giant Baidu’s CEO . “The new year’s pep talk delivered by Baidu’s chief executive for 2019 was a bit chilly. Robin Yanhong Li, CEO of China’s largest search engine, warned that ‘winter is coming’ in a letter to employees regarding China’s economic growth slowing down, according to South China Morning Post. Baidu is the equivalent of Google in China.”

Abacus News: 110,000 social media accounts shut down to ‘protect’ bored youth in China during winter holidays

Abacus News: 110,000 social media accounts shut down to ‘protect’ bored youth in China during winter holidays . “Since December 18, authorities shut down 110,000 social media accounts for spreading harmful information. Not only that, an impressive 496,000 illegal and irregular articles were scrubbed from online platforms, according to a statement by the Beijing office of the Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) released on Tuesday. If you find the timing odd, the crackdown may well have been motivated by the winter holiday season.”

Abacus News: Some of the biggest users of live streaming in China are not teenagers, they’re farmers

Abacus News: Some of the biggest users of live streaming in China are not teenagers, they’re farmers. “One live streamer recently managed to sell a million kilos of oranges in just 13 days by live streaming, according to reports. Chen Jiubei, who goes under the username of Xiangxi Jiumei, streams herself on Taobao doing farm work, talking about her cured meat or eggs, or just making meals in her humble countryside home.”

The Next Web: Rise of foreign stars in Chinese social media marks the beginning of a new trend

The Next Web: Rise of foreign stars in Chinese social media marks the beginning of a new trend. “China’s internet celebrity economy has expanded exponentially in recent years. According to a report released by iResearch, the number of online celebrities in China with more than 100,000 followers has increased by 57.3 percent since 2016. With a single embedded ad in a WeChat post worth up to $145,000 USD for influencers with dedicated followings, and a total market estimated at $14 billion USD in 2018 by Beijing-based research agency Analysus, it’s a sizeable, attractive market for internet personalities.”