ABC News Australia: National Library finds 120-year-old chocolates commissioned by Queen Victoria and owned by Banjo Paterson

ABC News Australia: National Library finds 120-year-old chocolates commissioned by Queen Victoria and owned by Banjo Paterson. “Conservators at the National Library of Australia have unearthed one of the world’s oldest boxes of chocolates, dating back 120 years to the time of the Boer War. The souvenir chocolate tin was discovered at the bottom of a box of personal papers from the estate of Australian bush poet Andrew Barton ‘Banjo’ Paterson. Remarkably, the chocolates were not only unmolested after more than a century, but still looked — almost — good enough to eat.”

Coronavirus: Rush to give away 15,000 Easter eggs after events cancelled (Sky News)

Sky News: Coronavirus: Rush to give away 15,000 Easter eggs after events cancelled. “Homes are needed for thousands of chocolate eggs left over after coronavirus forced the cancellation of Easter events, a heritage charity has said. The National Trust for Scotland (NTS) were given more than 30,000 boxed eggs by Cadbury for its egg hunts before the lockdown was imposed. Around half of the eggs have been donated to hospitals, food banks and community groups around Scotland.”

People Will Exchange Passwords for Chocolate?

Oh dear. Will people really give up passwords in exchange for chocolate? “During the experiment, researchers asked randomly selected passers-by about their attitude towards computer security, but also asked them for their password. The interviewers were carrying University of Luxembourg bags, but were otherwise unknown to the respondents. In one condition, participants were given chocolate before being asked for their password, while in the control group they were only given chocolate after the interview. The research showed that this small gift greatly increased the likelihood of participants giving away their password. If the chocolate was only given out afterwards, 29.8 per cent of participants revealed their passwords. However, if the chocolate was received generally beforehand, a total of 43.5% of the respondents shared their password with the interviewer.”