University of Texas at Austin: Choreographer Deborah Hay’s Archive Goes to the Harry Ransom Center

University of Texas at Austin: Choreographer Deborah Hay’s Archive Goes to the Harry Ransom Center. “Award-winning choreographer Deborah Hay has established her archive at the Harry Ransom Center, a major destination for the study of dance and performance at The University of Texas at Austin. A founding member of the Judson Dance Theater, Hay is recognized as a pivotal figure in the development of post-modern dance.”

University of Alabama: UA Professor Receives Prestigious Grant to Create Digital Dance Archive

University of Alabama: UA Professor Receives Prestigious Grant to Create Digital Dance Archive. “Funded by a nearly $100,000, two-year National Endowment for the Humanities grant, [Professor Rebecca] Salzer is collaborating with University of Texas at Austin dance professor Gesel R. Mason and Alabama Digital Humanities Center director Dr. Anne Ladyem McDivitt to create an online archive based on Mason’s collection of recordings titled No Boundaries: Dancing the Visions of Contemporary Black Choreographers. The digital archive will be constructed using the open-source software CollectiveAccess, and will serve as a prototype for future dance archives.”

University of Maryland: NEH grant will digitize local dance archive

University of Maryland: NEH grant will digitize local dance archive . “Founded in 1976, the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange in Takoma Park, MD, gained international acclaim by producing more than 100 innovative dance or theater works and touring throughout the United States and abroad. The grant-funded project will digitize and make freely available online 1,329 videotape recordings of rehearsals and performances as well as 211 performance programs of this renowned local institution.”

Capital Public Radio: Dancer Preserves The Work Of Black Choreographers, In One Video At A Time

Capital Public Radio: Dancer Preserves The Work Of Black Choreographers, In One Video At A Time . “When she was in her 20s, dancer Gesel Mason started emailing black choreographers she admired, asking them to create a solo for her. To her surprise, many of them said yes. ‘I did not know I was making my life’s work when I started it,’ she says. ‘I was just really interested in dancing with some choreographers.’”