Ars Technica: Chrome Apps are dead, as Google shuts down the Chrome Web Store section

Ars Technica: Chrome Apps are dead, as Google shuts down the Chrome Web Store section. “More than a year ago, Google announced that Chrome Apps would be removed from Windows, Mac, and Linux versions of Chrome (but not Chrome OS) some time in 2017, and it seems we’ve come to that point today. Google has shut down the ‘app’ section of the Chrome Web Store for those platforms, meaning you can’t install Chrome Apps anymore. Google has started sending out emails to Chrome app developers telling them that Chrome Apps are deprecated, and while previously installed apps still work, the functionality will be stripped out of Chrome in Q1 2018.”

TechCrunch: Google launches Chrome Enterprise subscription service for Chrome OS

TechCrunch: Google launches Chrome Enterprise subscription service for Chrome OS. “Google is launching a new enterprise service for large businesses that want to adopt Chrome OS devices. The new Chrome Enterprise subscription, which will cost $50 per device and year, is essentially a rebrand of Chromebooks for Work, but with a number of additional capabilities. Even though the name would make you think this is about the Chrome browser, this program is actually all about Chrome OS.”

Digital Trends: Turn Chrome OS Into A Powerhouse With The Best Chromebook Apps

Digital Trends: Turn Chrome OS Into A Powerhouse With The Best Chromebook Apps. “Chromebooks have won a well-deserved reputation as affordable, lightweight laptops designed around streaming and collaboration. This makes them popular among budget-conscious individuals, even if it’s the apps and extensions that can really make Chrome OS worthwhile. The best Chromebook apps further the operating system’s functionality, allowing you to quickly save content for offline viewing and diagram the small intricacies that make up photosynthesis, among a slew of other actions.”

Engadget: Touch-friendly controls are coming to Chrome OS

Engadget: Touch-friendly controls are coming to Chrome OS . “Google’s lightweight Chrome OS was never intended for touch, but that didn’t stop the likes of Samsung and Acer creating touch-enabled Chromebooks. It probably helped that the OS was set to receive access to millions of Android apps. All that was left was to put those touch displays to good use. And, the updated launcher for Chrome Canary (the experimental iteration) is a sign of things to come.”

Digital Trends: Turn Your Chromebook Into A Killer Workstation With The Best Android Apps On Chrome OS

Digital Trends: Turn Your Chromebook Into A Killer Workstation With The Best Android Apps On Chrome OS. “Google opened up its Chrome OS platform a while back, bringing its massive Android ecosystem to the ultra-light operating system. That means you can install Android apps on your Chromebook, that light, little thing running on a modified version of the Chrome browser. That’s over 2.5 million apps! With that in mind, we went ahead and sorted through the Google Play store for the best Chrome OS Android apps currently available.”

Ars Technica: How to install Linux on a Chromebook (and why you should)

Ars Technica: How to install Linux on a Chromebook (and why you should). “Chromebooks are one of the most secure devices you can give a non-technical end user, and at a price point few can argue with, but that security comes with a privacy trade off: you have to trust Google, which is part of the NSA’s Prism programme, with your data in the cloud.”

Digital Trends: Google Just Made It A Lot Easier To Print From Chrome OS

Digital Trends: Google Just Made It A Lot Easier To Print From Chrome OS. “For all the advances we’ve made when it comes to desktop and laptop technology, we still haven’t fully mastered the art of printing. But now, we may finally be nearing a solution. It’s all thanks to the latest Chrome OS — version 59, which has now reached the Stable release channel, has a new ‘Native Printing’ feature, which is to say that it can directly connect to all compatible printers within your network. Better still, it can do this without any cloud connection.”