Best web browsers of 2017: Chrome, Edge, Firefox, and Opera go head-to-head (PC World)

PC World: Best web browsers of 2017: Chrome, Edge, Firefox, and Opera go head-to-head. “Let’s take a look at the four major (and modern) browsers to see how they stack up in the latter half of 2017. A few things have changed since we looked at the top browsers just a few short months ago. Microsoft released the Fall Creators Update in October, and in our tests it seemed to have a significant impact on browser results.”

MakeUseOf: 5 Alternative New Browsers to Replace Chrome

MakeUseOf: 5 Alternative New Browsers to Replace Chrome. “Browsers are the windows to the world wide web. Google Chrome rules the roost today, but a few new challengers might fit your needs better. For all its great features, Chrome hogs system memory and drains the battery. But that huge collection of extensions, and exclusive features like Translate and Google Cast, make it hard to give up on. So in case you’re feeling trapped in Chrome, try out one of these.” Okay, I gotta try Addap.

Lifehacker: Keep Tweets in Your Timeline to 140 Characters With This Chrome Extension

Lifehacker: Keep Tweets in Your Timeline to 140 Characters With This Chrome Extension . “I liked Twitter better when everyone got 140 characters. That’s the whole point of Twitter: brevity, concision, a strong editorial hand on the tiller. So I was not at all pleased to see the company’s announcement that all users now get 280 characters, which I believe will encourage a certain sloppiness in expression—a slippery slope straight down into logorrhea.”

The Next Web: Google plans to update Chrome with better ad-fighting features

The Next Web: Google plans to update Chrome with better ad-fighting features. “Google is rolling out new security features for Chrome which will make it harder for third-party ads to subvert pop-up blockers or disguise links within a site. On its Chromium blog, Google admits to getting lots of user feedback saying that sites will randomly redirect to other pages — one in five feedback reports relate to seeing unwanted content. Some pages do it automatically, while others have transparent overlays or deceptive buttons.”

Berkeley: Fed up, two UC Berkeley students launch tool to spot Twitter bots

Berkeley: Fed up, two UC Berkeley students launch tool to spot Twitter bots. “Two UC Berkeley undergraduate computer science students are doing what they say Twitter won’t: sorting out and tagging the angry propaganda bots designed to undermine, destabilize and inflame American political discourse. This week, the two 20-year-olds, Ash Bhat and Rohan Phadte, launched a Google Chrome browser extension that puts a button onto every Twitter profile and tweet. With a click on the Botcheck.me button, users can see if the account is run by a person or automated program, based on the pair’s own machine-learning model.”

Neowin: More Chrome traffic is encrypted than ever before

Neowin: More Chrome traffic is encrypted than ever before. “Google has issued a new transparency report which details how much Chrome traffic is encrypted across different platforms. Some highlights from the data are that 64% of Chrome traffic on Android is now using HTTPS encryption compared to 42% a year ago, over 75% of Chrome traffic on ChromeOS and the Mac is now protected – that’s up from 67% and 60% respectively, and that 71 of the top 100 sites on the web now use HTTPS by default, up from 37 a year ago.”

PC Magazine: Microsoft Chastises Google Over Chrome Security

PC Magazine: Microsoft Chastises Google Over Chrome Security. “Microsoft this week threw a subtle jab at Google by revealing a security hole in Chrome. In a Wednesday blog post, Redmond examined Google’s browser security, and took the opportunity to throw some shade at Chrome’s security philosophy, while also touting the benefits of its own Edge browser.”