MakeUseOf: The 8 Best Chrome Privacy Extensions for Better Security

MakeUseOf: The 8 Best Chrome Privacy Extensions for Better Security. “Google Chrome is the world’s most popular web browser. But it isn’t the world’s most private browser—not by a long shot. Chrome receives consistently poor reviews regarding its approach to privacy. As the world’s largest advertising company, Google is a prime position to exploit the millions of Chrome users around the globe. Thankfully, you can take steps to increase your Google Chrome privacy using extensions. Here are the 8 best privacy extensions for Google Chrome.”

ZDNet: What’s the most popular web browser in 2020?

ZDNet: What’s the most popular web browser in 2020?. “For ages, it was almost impossible to get hard data on which were the most popular web browsers. Sure, many companies claimed to have good information, such as NetMarketShare and StatCounter, but their numbers were massaged. The US federal government’s Digital Analytics Program (DAP), however, gives us a running count of the last 90 days of US government website visits. While it doesn’t tell us about global web browser use, it’s the best information we have about American web browser users.”

Neowin: Google patches Chrome zero-day vulnerability currently being exploited

Neowin: Google patches Chrome zero-day vulnerability currently being exploited. “Google has released an update for Chrome that patches three security bugs, one of which is a zero-day vulnerability that is currently being exploited. The vulnerability, under the identifier CVE-2020-6418, was discovered by Clement Lecigne, a member of Google’s Threat Analysis Group, on February 18.”

SlashGear: Chrome 81 is shaping up to be an AR-packed release

SlashGear: Chrome 81 is shaping up to be an AR-packed release. “With Chrome 81, Google is extending its support to augmented reality, specifically with the WebXR Hit Test API. In a nutshell, this means that developers can use a device’s camera view to correctly place virtual objects on surfaces both horizontal and vertical. Google promises that those who already played around with WebXR API won’t need to relearn things as it applies to both VR and AR experiences.”

The Register: Google burns down more than 500 private-data-stealing, ad-defrauding Chrome extensions installed by 1.7m netizens

The Register: Google burns down more than 500 private-data-stealing, ad-defrauding Chrome extensions installed by 1.7m netizens. “Google has removed more than 500 Chrome extensions in response to a report from a security researcher, who found the browser plugins distributed through the Chrome Web Store facilitated ad fraud and data theft.”

The Register: Google Chrome to block file downloads – from .exe to .txt – over HTTP by default this year. And we’re OK with this

The Register: Google Chrome to block file downloads – from .exe to .txt – over HTTP by default this year. And we’re OK with this. “Continuing to drop flame retardant on the dumpster fire that is web security, Google on Thursday said it will soon prevent Chrome users from downloading files over insecure, plain old, unencrypted HTTP.”

Bleeping Computer: Google Chrome Tests Replacing URLs With Search Queries in Address Bar

Bleeping Computer: Google Chrome Tests Replacing URLs With Search Queries in Address Bar. “Google has started testing a feature that will display the search query in the Chrome address bar rather than the actual page’s URL when performing searches on Google. This experimental feature is called ‘Query in Omnibox’ and has been available as a flag in Google Chrome since Chrome 71, but is disabled by default.” Computer ain’t the only one bleeping at this news.

Neowin: Google will start block intrusive video ads in Chrome

Neowin: Google will start block intrusive video ads in Chrome. “In response to the new standard set by the Coalition for Better Ads, Google announced that it will begin blocking ads on websites that repeatedly violate these guidelines starting on August 5. It’s likely that other browsers will follow suit, and since this announcement was made on the Chromium blog, other browsers based on the Chromium project shouldn’t have to do much to implement the feature.”

Ars Technica: More than 200 browser extensions ejected from Firefox and Chrome stores

Ars Technica: More than 200 browser extensions ejected from Firefox and Chrome stores. “Mozilla and Google are cracking down on malicious and abusive extensions available for the Firefox and Chrome browsers, respectively. The moves come in response to the recent detection of add-ons that turned out to violate the browser maker’s policies, despite review processes designed to weed out wares that are malicious or have the potential to be malicious.”

Gizmodo: Google’s Next Chrome Update May Cause ‘Modest Breakage’ To The Internet

Gizmodo: Google’s Next Chrome Update May Cause ‘Modest Breakage’ To The Internet. “Version 80 of Chrome is coming to the stable channel of the browser, and with it, a change in the way cookies are handled. As the cookies crumble, it turns out, so does the Internet, with Google saying it hopes that it will cause only ‘a modest amount of breakage’ to websites.”

Google halts paid-for Chrome extension updates amid fraud surge: Web Store in lockdown ‘due to the scale of abuse’ (The Register)

The Register: Google halts paid-for Chrome extension updates amid fraud surge: Web Store in lockdown ‘due to the scale of abuse’ . “On Saturday, Google temporarily disabled the ability to publish paid Chrome apps, extensions, and themes in the Chrome Web Store due to a surge in fraud.”

How-To Geek: How to Install and Use Extensions in the New Microsoft Edge

How-To Geek: How to Install and Use Extensions in the New Microsoft Edge. “The new Microsoft Edge browser, based on the Chromium project used by Google Chrome, brings a better browsing experience to Windows 10 PCs. One unique feature is the ability to use extensions from both Microsoft and Chrome Web Store. Here’s how to install and use them. You’ll need to download the new Microsoft Edge browser and install it before you begin.”

Google Blog: Manage audio and video in Chrome with one click

Google Blog: Manage audio and video in Chrome with one click. “We’ve all been there: You have lots of tabs open and one of them starts playing a video, but you can’t figure out which one. Or you’re listening to music in your browser in the background and want to change the song without stopping your work to find the right tab. With Chrome’s latest update, it’s now easier to control audio and video in your browser. Just click the icon in the top right corner of Chrome on desktop, open the new media hub and manage what’s playing from there.”