How-To Geek: How to Install and Use Extensions in the New Microsoft Edge

How-To Geek: How to Install and Use Extensions in the New Microsoft Edge. “The new Microsoft Edge browser, based on the Chromium project used by Google Chrome, brings a better browsing experience to Windows 10 PCs. One unique feature is the ability to use extensions from both Microsoft and Chrome Web Store. Here’s how to install and use them. You’ll need to download the new Microsoft Edge browser and install it before you begin.”

PC World: Microsoft will begin replacing Microsoft Edge with its Chromium-based browser next week

PC World: Microsoft will begin replacing Microsoft Edge with its Chromium-based browser next week. “Microsoft said in November that the new Chromium-based Edge would begin replacing the ‘traditional’ Edge, which uses Microsoft’s own EdgeHTML to render pages. Yusuf Mehdi, corporate vice president in charge of Microsoft’s Modern Life & Devices Group, told PCWorld that the process would begin on January 15.”

TechCrunch: Microsoft’s new Chromium-based Edge browser is now in beta

TechCrunch: Microsoft’s new Chromium-based Edge browser is now in beta. “Microsoft today launched the first beta builds of its new Chromium-based Edge browser for Windows and Mac. The new beta channel, which will see a new update roughly every six weeks, will join the existing dev and canary channels, which will continue to see daily and weekly updates, respectively.”

Hands-on: First public previews of Chromium-based Edge are now out (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: Hands-on: First public previews of Chromium-based Edge are now out. “Microsoft’s switch to using the Chromium engine to power its Edge browser was announced in December last year, and the first public preview build is out now. Canary builds, updated daily, and Dev builds, updated weekly, are available for Windows 10. Versions for other operating systems and a beta that’s updated every six weeks are promised to be coming soon.”

Neowin: Chromium-based Edge leaks in its entirety, and you can install it now

Neowin: Chromium-based Edge leaks in its entirety, and you can install it now. “Over the last few weeks, there have been lots of leaks around Microsoft’s new Chromium-based Edge browser. First, we reported on screenshots that were leaked, then there were support documents, an extensions page, and even an installer that didn’t work. But now, the full browser has leaked for anyone to try out.” This is a third-party leak and therefore is not necessarily secure. I would recommend against installing this unless a) you have a sandbox machine to play with or b) you are made entirely out of rabbits’ feet.

The Register: Wow, fancy that. Web ad giant Google to block ad-blockers in Chrome. For safety, apparently

The Register: Wow, fancy that. Web ad giant Google to block ad-blockers in Chrome. For safety, apparently. “Google engineers have proposed changes to the open-source Chromium browser that will break content-blocking extensions, including various ad blockers. Adblock Plus will most likely not be affected, though similar third-party plugins will, for reasons we will explain. The drafted changes will also limit the capabilities available to extension developers, ostensibly for the sake of speed and safety. Chromium forms the central core of Google Chrome, and, soon, Microsoft Edge.”

Neowin: Former Edge intern says Google sabotaged Microsoft’s browser

Neowin: Former Edge intern says Google sabotaged Microsoft’s browser. “Almost two weeks ago, Microsoft announced that it will be rebuilding its in-house Edge browser from Chromium, all but ditching its EdgeHTML rendering engine. There are many reasons for the change, and the speculation goes even beyond that. Microsoft said that it will do a better job of standardizing the web; using the same open-source browser as Google’s Chrome makes things easier on developers. Former software engineering intern on the Edge team at Microsoft Joshua Bakita says otherwise though.” This is one person saying this as far as I can tell, and I haven’t seen stories anywhere else. If I hear more, I’ll post more.

ZDNet: SQLite bug impacts thousands of apps, including all Chromium-based browsers

ZDNet: SQLite bug impacts thousands of apps, including all Chromium-based browsers. “Discovered by Tencent’s Blade security team, the vulnerability allows an attacker to run malicious code on the victim’s computer, and in less dangerous situations, leak program memory or cause program crashes. Because SQLite is embedded in thousands of apps, the vulnerability impacts a wide range of software, from IoT devices to desktop software, and from web browsers to Android and iOS apps.” So we find out about this Chromium vulnerability almost immediately after Microsoft and Brave announce they’re moving to Chromium? Lovely.

Mozilla Blog: Goodbye, EdgeHTML

Mozilla Blog: Goodbye, EdgeHTML. “By adopting Chromium, Microsoft hands over control of even more of online life to Google. This may sound melodramatic, but it’s not. The ‘browser engines’ — Chromium from Google and Gecko Quantum from Mozilla — are ‘inside baseball’ pieces of software that actually determine a great deal of what each of us can do online. They determine core capabilities such as which content we as consumers can see, how secure we are when we watch content, and how much control we have over what websites and services can do to us. Microsoft’s decision gives Google more ability to single-handedly decide what possibilities are available to each one of us.”

The Verge: Microsoft is building its own Chrome browser to replace Edge

The Verge: Microsoft is building its own Chrome browser to replace Edge. “Microsoft is building its own Chromium browser to replace the default on Windows 10. The software giant first introduced its Edge browser three years ago, with a redesign to replace Internet Explorer and modernize the default browsing experience to compete with Chrome and others. While the modern look and feel has paid off for Edge, the underlying browser engine (EdgeHTML) has struggled to keep up with Chromium. Microsoft is finally giving up and moving its default Windows 10 browser to Chromium.”

Make Tech Easier: Top 5 Chromium-Based Web Browsers of 2018

Make Tech Easier: Top 5 Chromium-Based Web Browsers of 2018. “What if you’re a Chrome user and like its performance but can’t stand the way that Google incessantly impedes on your privacy? What if you’re ready to move on but not ready to suffer the culture shock of adopting the look and feel of an entirely new browser? Currently, there are over twenty Chromium-based browsers, and this number is steadily growing.”

Privacy: Avast launches Chromium-based Secure Browser (BetaNews)

BetaNews: Privacy: Avast launches Chromium-based Secure Browser. “The far-reaching tentacles of the likes of Google and Facebook have focused people’s attention on online privacy, but for anyone looking to retain a modicum of confidentiality it can be hard to know what to do. There are VPN tools, but these are not for everyone, for anyone looking for a quick solution, Avast Secure Browser could be the answer. This new Chromium-based browser is billed as being ‘private, fast, and secure’ and it’s designed to address the misconceptions many people have about privacy and security online. The browser is a renamed and updated version of SafeZone.”