BuzzFeed News: Trump Said Don’t Let COVID Dominate Your Life. These Millennials Don’t Know If They Will Ever Get Better.

BuzzFeed News: Trump Said Don’t Let COVID Dominate Your Life. These Millennials Don’t Know If They Will Ever Get Better.. “As the United States closes in on nearly 8 million coronavirus cases, thousands of people are still suffering from debilitating symptoms months after they contracted the virus. COVID-19 has upended their lives, changed their bodies, and made it difficult to complete everyday tasks or, in some cases, hold down jobs. A CDC study from this summer found that 1 in 5 people aged 18 to 34 who tested positive for COVID-19 had not recovered their health after a few weeks. Some may be chronically ill and need long-term care. Months into the pandemic, there’s still no real treatment plan for these patients and many say their own doctors, friends, family members — and now their president — continue to downplay what they are going through.”

Coronavirus: ‘Long Covid could be four different syndromes’ (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: ‘Long Covid could be four different syndromes’. “‘Long Covid’ – the long-lasting impact of coronavirus infection – may be affecting people in four different ways, according to a review. And this could explain why some of those with continuing symptoms are not being believed or treated.”

‘I Feel Like I Have Dementia’: Brain Fog Plagues Covid Survivors (New York Times)

New York Times: ‘I Feel Like I Have Dementia’: Brain Fog Plagues Covid Survivors. “It’s becoming known as Covid brain fog: troubling cognitive symptoms that can include memory loss, confusion, difficulty focusing, dizziness and grasping for everyday words. Increasingly, Covid survivors say brain fog is impairing their ability to work and function normally.”

Washington Post: It’s time to focus on potential long-term organ damage from covid-19

Washington Post: It’s time to focus on potential long-term organ damage from covid-19. “New cases of covid-19 are declining across the country, so it’s tempting to wonder whether the worst of the pandemic is behind us. Not by a long shot. Even as cases decline, it is possible we could soon be grappling with the burden of prolonged or permanent organ damage among the millions of people who have survived covid-19. There’s still a lot we don’t know about the long-term effects of this disease, but they could cripple not just these ‘survivors’ but also our health-care system and our economy, too.”

New York Times: For Long-Haulers, Covid-19 Takes a Toll on Mind as Well as Body

New York Times: For Long-Haulers, Covid-19 Takes a Toll on Mind as Well as Body. “Forty hours after treating her first coronavirus patient, on March 30, Angela Aston came home to her family with a cough. ‘Gosh, your throat is scratchy,’ her husband told her. Right away she knew she had likely been infected with Covid-19. As a nurse practitioner, Ms. Aston, 50, was confident she knew how to handle her symptoms, and disappeared to her bedroom to quarantine and rest. By day 50 of her illness, that confidence had disappeared.”

BBC: She got ill when the pandemic hit – and still is, six months later

BBC: She got ill when the pandemic hit – and still is, six months later. “Monique Jackson believes she caught Covid-19 early in the pandemic and nearly six months later she’s still unwell. One of thousands in this position, she has been keeping an illustrated diary about her symptoms and her vain attempts to get treatment.”

“They Sent Us To Just Fade Away And Die”: Men Incarcerated at Cuomo’s Prison Nursing Home Say They Can’t Access Medical Care (Gothamist)

Gothamist: “They Sent Us To Just Fade Away And Die”: Men Incarcerated at Cuomo’s Prison Nursing Home Say They Can’t Access Medical Care. “An 80-year-old man, suffering from osteoporosis, ordered to do manual labor. A 63-year-old with AIDS deprived of a routine blood test. A 64-year-old with chronic lung disease unable to see a doctor. These are some of the stories from men incarcerated at the Adirondack Correctional Facility, a prison in Ray Brook, New York, just south of the Canadian border. Nearly 100 inmates over the age of 60 were hastily transferred there in June, as COVID-19 was spreading through downstate prisons.”

UT San Antonio Health: Post-COVID syndrome severely damages children’s hearts; ‘immense inflammation’ causing cardiac blood vessel dilation

UT San Antonio Health: Post-COVID syndrome severely damages children’s hearts; ‘immense inflammation’ causing cardiac blood vessel dilation. “Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), believed to be linked to COVID-19, damages the heart to such an extent that some children will need lifelong monitoring and interventions, said the senior author of a medical literature review published Sept. 4 in EClinicalMedicine, a journal of The Lancet.”

The Atlantic: Long-Haulers Are Redefining COVID-19

The Atlantic: Long-Haulers Are Redefining COVID-19. “Lauren nichols has been sick with COVID-19 since March 10, shortly before Tom Hanks announced his diagnosis and the NBA temporarily canceled its season. She has lived through one month of hand tremors, three of fever, and four of night sweats. When we spoke on day 150, she was on her fifth month of gastrointestinal problems and severe morning nausea. She still has extreme fatigue, bulging veins, excessive bruising, an erratic heartbeat, short-term memory loss, gynecological problems, sensitivity to light and sounds, and brain fog.”

Washington Post: Don’t just look at covid-19 fatality rates. Look at people who survive — but don’t entirely recover.

Washington Post: Don’t just look at covid-19 fatality rates. Look at people who survive — but don’t entirely recover.. “At least seven elite college athletes have developed myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart muscle that can have severe consequences, including sudden death. An Austrian doctor who treats scuba divers reported that six patients, who had only mild covid-19 infections, seem to have significant and permanent lung damage. Social media communities sprang up of people who are still suffering, months after they were infected, with everything from chronic fatigue and ‘brain fog’ to chest pain and recurrent fevers. Now, data is coming in behind the anecdotes, and while it’s preliminary, it’s also ‘concerning,’ says Clyde Yancy, chief of cardiology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.”

ScienceBlog: Smartphones May Help Detect Diabetes

ScienceBlog: Smartphones May Help Detect Diabetes. “Researchers at UC San Francisco have developed a ‘digital biomarker’ that would use a smartphone’s built-in camera to detect Type 2 diabetes – one of the world’s top causes of disease and death – potentially providing a low-cost, in-home alternative to blood draws and clinic-based screening tools.”

‘I was worried I’d end up bald.’ Survivors alarmed by latest fallout of COVID-19 — their hair (The Star)

The Star: ‘I was worried I’d end up bald.’ Survivors alarmed by latest fallout of COVID-19 — their hair. “It was about three months after she first got sick with COVID-19 that Heather Colton’s fiancé started noticing strands of her thick dark hair all around the house. There would be clumps in the drain at the end of every shower…. The Belleville fast-food worker is not the only one experiencing this strange lingering impact of COVID-19. Called telogen effluvium, it often happens after a major illness or trauma. And it’s just one more sign, doctors say, that the strange new virus can impact the body beyond just the lungs, and, even in young people, trigger devastating impacts that last long beyond just 14 days.”

Medical News Today: Tool to help manage COVID-19 patients with diabetes

Medical News Today: Tool to help manage COVID-19 patients with diabetes. “In a new study published in the journal Diabetes, a team from the University of Michigan describes the management of almost 200 COVID-19 hospitalized patients with high blood sugar levels. From their observations, the team developed an algorithm to help doctors manage the blood sugar levels in people who have COVID-19 and diabetes. They say the tool could help reduce the risk of severe complications, including kidney failure and severe respiratory distress, in these patients.”

NBC News: These women’s coronavirus symptoms never went away. Their doctors’ willingness to help did.

NBC News: These women’s coronavirus symptoms never went away. Their doctors’ willingness to help did.. “The frightening symptoms began in early March, when Ailsa Court of Portland, Oregon, suspects she caught the coronavirus from someone at work. More than four months later, she still has shortness of breath, achiness in her lungs, and a strange tingling in her calves. But doctors have downplayed Court’s concerns as her health problems have dragged on. At one point, her primary care doctor suggested that perhaps she was just ‘stressed because of the economy,’ she said.”