Rutgers University: VA Taps Rutgers Professor to Build Database Linking Veteran Ailments to Exposure From Burn Pits

Rutgers University: VA Taps Rutgers Professor to Build Database Linking Veteran Ailments to Exposure From Burn Pits. “Scott Parrott, a Rutgers professor with more than 30 years of experience in methodology and statistics, will work with the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) to create a database of evidence linking toxic exposure to burn pits to diseases such as cancer.”

Editorial: Open the NYC 9/11 files: The city must release its archives on air quality during the rescue and recovery efforts (New York Daily News)

New York Daily News: Editorial: Open the NYC 9/11 files: The city must release its archives on air quality during the rescue and recovery efforts. “Lawyers for the City of New York are sitting on a hidden library of documents about the environmental and health hazards from Ground Zero dating back to 2001 that must be published. Survivors and responders want to know what the city knew, and Reps. Jerry Nadler and Carolyn Maloney have been pressing for years for City Hall to release the archive.”

Open Medicine Foundation: Announcing Our Newest Center to Advance Medical Education

Open Medicine Foundation: Announcing Our Newest Center to Advance Medical Education. “Big news! Open Medicine Foundation (OMF) is thrilled to announce the launch of our 7th funded Center: The OMF Supported Medical Education Resource Center (MERC) at Bateman Horne Center. In partnership with Bateman Horne Center, the MERC aims to increase the number of knowledgeable healthcare providers equipped to treat ME/CFS, Long COVID, and related multi-system chronic complex diseases (msCCD).”

Social Media and Chronic Illness: An Impact That Transcends a Screen (CNET)

CNET: Social Media and Chronic Illness: An Impact That Transcends a Screen. “Before the digital era, it was nearly impossible to connect with others who had similar illnesses, let alone see the scale of chronic illness visibility. But social media is changing that. Many people with chronic illnesses have turned to social platforms to share their stories in the hope that it’ll prove helpful to anyone experiencing a similar situation.”

Ars Technica: Autopsies suggest COVID’s smell loss is caused by inflammation, not virus

Ars Technica: Autopsies suggest COVID’s smell loss is caused by inflammation, not virus. “Although the loss of smell and taste became apparent symptoms of COVID-19 early in the pandemic, researchers are still working out why that happens—is the virus directly infecting and destroying the cells responsible for these critical senses, or is it collateral damage from our immune systems fighting off the invading foe? According to a postmortem study out this week in JAMA Neurology, it’s the latter.”

CNN: Long Covid-19 may remain a chronic condition for millions

CNN: Long Covid-19 may remain a chronic condition for millions. “Covid-19 has become a chronic condition for tens of millions of people — and an expensive one, as well. Long Covid — a condition marked by lingering symptoms that can involve multiple bodily systems — has cost a cumulative $386 billion in lost wages, savings and medical expenses in the US alone as of January, according to one estimate.”

TIME: Back-to-Office Pressure Is Creating a Crisis for Long COVID Patients

TIME: Back-to-Office Pressure Is Creating a Crisis for Long COVID Patients. “Millions of people in the U.S. have chronic illnesses or physical disabilities, and advocates have been calling for better workplace accommodations and federal disability policies since well before the pandemic. But two big changes in the workforce—an alarming number of newly disabled adults in the U.S. (many of them likely long-haulers) and millions of open jobs that need to be filled—may finally force companies to become more accommodating.”

NPR: Evidence grows that vaccines lower the risk of getting long COVID

NPR: Evidence grows that vaccines lower the risk of getting long COVID. “Unfortunately, the only sure way to avoid long COVID is not to catch the virus in the first place. But there is now a growing body of research that’s offering at least some reassurance for those who do end up getting infected — being fully vaccinated seems to substantially cut the risk of later developing the persistent symptoms that characterize long COVID.”

COVID-19: Understanding long COVID (Emory University)

Emory University: COVID-19: Understanding long COVID. “For some individuals, the road to recovery from COVID-19 is long. While most people recover from mild COVID-19 symptoms over the course of one to two weeks, ‘long-haul’ patients can suffer from lingering symptoms for months on end. This syndrome, called post-acute COVID-19 or ‘long COVID,’ can have devastating effects on the daily lives of millions of patients. To discuss what we know about long COVID, Jodie Guest, PhD, professor and vice chair of the department of epidemiology at Emory’s Rollins School of Public Health, teamed up with Alex Truong, MD, co-director of the post-COVID clinic at Emory’s Executive Park.”

The Global and Mail: What does ‘living with’ COVID-19 mean? HIV/AIDS activists offer lessons from pandemics past

The Globe and Mail: What does ‘living with’ COVID-19 mean? HIV/AIDS activists offer lessons from pandemics past. “What does it mean for a population to ‘live with’ COVID-19, in the long term? What can be done to temper the social divisions that persist around this virus? How do we deal with its lingering effects, including long COVID? Two years since the pandemic took hold, how do we calibrate risk and function alongside it? One population has significant experience with similar questions: gay men who either came of age during the height of the AIDS crisis in the 1990s or adapted in subsequent generations.”

A ‘tornado’ in the body: Battling long COVID, months after infection (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: A ‘tornado’ in the body: Battling long COVID, months after infection. “While the pandemic may finally be easing in Western Pennsylvania, COVID-19 is not over for patients like Mr. [Joseph] Wheeler, who have what is known as long COVID. Most people who get COVID-19 recover within a few weeks, but others can develop new or lingering health problems that last for months after first catching the virus. For many of these long COVID patients, symptoms are debilitating or disruptive to daily life. Some can’t return to work or enjoy many of the activities they once did.”

ABC News: Inside woman’s long COVID battle as US marks 2nd anniversary of coronavirus pandemic

ABC News: Inside woman’s long COVID battle as US marks 2nd anniversary of coronavirus pandemic. “Nicole Wahler was in her mid-20s and in the best shape of her life when she tested positive for COVID-19 in June 2020. Now, nearly two years later, Wahler, 28, said she is still suffering from the effects of the virus, which to date has killed nearly 6 million people around the world.”

BBC: Scans reveal how Covid may change the brain

BBC: Scans reveal how Covid may change the brain. “Catching Covid may cause changes to the brain, a study suggests. Scientists found significant differences in MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scans before and after infection. Even after a mild infection, the overall size of the brain had shrunk slightly, with less grey matter in the parts related to smell and memory.”