Director of National Intelligence: Intelligence Community Releases Newly Declassified Tet Offensive Documents

Director of National Intelligence: Intelligence Community Releases Newly Declassified Tet Offensive Documents. “On January 4, 2018, in recognition of the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War’s Tet Offensive, Director of National Intelligence Daniel R. Coats directed intelligence agencies to review their holdings for historical material of current interest relating to the IC’s role in the Tet Offensive. Today the Intelligence Community has published the first installment of the newly declassified documents relating to the Tet Offensive, highlighting material from the Central Intelligence Agency and National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency.”

Unredacted: New Digital National Security Archive Document Collection Highlights CIA Covert Operations from 1961-1974

Unredacted: New Digital National Security Archive Document Collection Highlights CIA Covert Operations from 1961-1974. “Explore important historical events, like the epic Bay of Pigs disaster, through the lens of little-known or under-explored covert activities in the National Security Archive’s latest digital collection, CIA Covert Operations, Part III – From Kennedy to Nixon. This Digital National Security Archive (DNSA) collection, the most comprehensive of its kind, is the third of five installments concerning the bread and butter of U.S. intelligence operations – covert operations.” Not free, as you might imagine. A product of ProQuest.

Guerrilla FOIAfare: How to use exemption codes to find the most interesting documents hidden in the CIA archives (MuckRock)

MuckRock: Guerrilla FOIAfare: How to use exemption codes to find the most interesting documents hidden in the CIA archives . “As many researchers have learned over the years, government agencies in general and the Central Intelligence Agency in particular often apply exemptions very broadly, and at times, bordering on the ridiculous. Exemption codes, on the other hand, can still be useful to researchers, journalists, and curious citizens – by searching for these codes, clever researchers can find documents that discuss war plans, cryptography, WMDs, and diplomatically damaging information.”

Wilson Center: Ryszard Kuklinski CIA Documents Available in HAPP Digital Archive

Wilson Center: Ryszard Kuklinski CIA Documents Available in HAPP Digital Archive. “Ryszard Kuklinski was a Polish colonel and Cold War spy who passed top secret Warsaw Pact documents to the United States Central Intelligence Agency between 1972 and 1981. Kuklinski, a senior officer on the Polish General Staff and aide to Polish prime minister and communist party chief (and later president) Wojciech Jaruzelski, volunteered his services to the United States Army in 1972. For over nine years, Kuklinski provided the CIA with more than 40,000 pages of documents regarding the innermost secrets of the Warsaw Pact, ‘the secrets of the kitchen’ in the words of Jaruzelski. The documents Kuklinski shared included war plans—intelligence that was deemed of ‘truly great strategic significance’ by Zbigniew Brzezinski, President Carter’s national security adviser.”

Dallas News: New JFK files show FBI misplaced Oswald’s fingerprints, and CIA opened his mail — and John Steinbeck’s

Dallas News: New JFK files show FBI misplaced Oswald’s fingerprints, and CIA opened his mail — and John Steinbeck’s. “The National Archives unsealed thousands of pages from the Kennedy files on Friday [This was seven days ago, not today – TJC] And while assassinations buffs weren’t likely to find any major revelations — no proof of a second gunman, a Cuban plot, or evidence the killer could have been stopped — they’ll have plenty to chew on.”

Quartz: Google’s true origin partly lies in CIA and NSA research grants for mass surveillance

Quartz: Google’s true origin partly lies in CIA and NSA research grants for mass surveillance. “Two decades ago, the US intelligence community worked closely with Silicon Valley in an effort to track citizens in cyberspace. And Google is at the heart of that origin story. Some of the research that led to Google’s ambitious creation was funded and coordinated by a research group established by the intelligence community to find ways to track individuals and groups online.” I realize that headline is a bit bonkers, but the article is written by someone who identifies himself as a former employee of the National Science Foundation.