BuzzFeed News: This Website Will Turn Wikipedia Articles Into “Real” Academic Papers

BuzzFeed News: This Website Will Turn Wikipedia Articles Into “Real” Academic Papers. “The digital product agency MSCHF released a site called M-Journal on Tuesday that will turn any Wikipedia article into a ‘real’ academic article. You can screenshot it, you can cite it — and you can send a link to your teacher. What MSCHF did was republish the entirety of Wikipedia under its own academic journal. If you go over to the site, you can search any Wikipedia article or paste in a link, and it’ll generate a citation that refers to MSCHF’s M-Journal, not Wikipedia.”

Phys .org: Deaths of prominent life scientists tend to be followed by a surge in highly cited research by newcomers

Phys .org: Deaths of prominent life scientists tend to be followed by a surge in highly cited research by newcomers. “…when star scientists die, their subfields see a subsequent 8.6 percent increase, on average, of articles by researchers who have not previously collaborated with those star scientists. Moreover, those papers published by the newcomers to these fields are much more likely to be influential and highly cited than other pieces of research.”

Nature: Hundreds of extreme self-citing scientists revealed in new database

Nature: Hundreds of extreme self-citing scientists revealed in new database. “[Sundarapandian] Vaidyanathan, a computer scientist at the Vel Tech R&D Institute of Technology, a privately run institute, is an extreme example: he has received 94% of his citations from himself or his co-authors up to 2017, according to a study in PLoS Biology this month1. He is not alone. The data set, which lists around 100,000 researchers, shows that at least 250 scientists have amassed more than 50% of their citations from themselves or their co-authors, while the median self-citation rate is 12.7%.”

Google Scholar Blog: 2019 Scholar Metrics Released

Google Scholar Blog: 2019 Scholar Metrics Released. “Scholar Metrics provide an easy way for authors to quickly gauge the visibility and influence of recent articles in scholarly publications. Today, we are releasing the 2019 version of Scholar Metrics. This release covers articles published in 2014–2018 and includes citations from all articles that were indexed in Google Scholar as of July 2019.”

EurekAlert: Hyphens in paper titles harm citation counts and journal impact factors

EurekAlert: Hyphens in paper titles harm citation counts and journal impact factors. “According to the latest research results, the presence of simple hyphens in the titles of academic papers adversely affects the citation statistics, regardless of the quality of the articles. The phenomenon applies to all major subject areas. Thus, citation counts and journal impact factors, commonly used for professorial evaluations in universities worldwide, are unreliable.”

Make Tech Easier: Make Bibliographies Easier with These Citation Apps

Make Tech Easier: Make Bibliographies Easier with These Citation Apps. “If you are a high school or college student, you have undoubtedly been asked to use citations for your sources and to create a bibliography for your paper. This is not an easy task. It can be challenging to keep track of all the different formats and places to find information. Using a citation manager or citation builder will save you considerable time, freeing up more time for the actual writing of the paper. They will also reduce the number of errors.”

Slate: The Internet’s Dizzying Citogenesis Problem

Slate: The Internet’s Dizzying Citogenesis Problem. “Two weeks ago, Dr. James Heilman discovered something strange. The Canadian emergency room physician and avid Wikipedia contributor noticed that DrugBank, an online database for drug information, was copying text directly from Wikipedia. Although Heilman considers Wikipedia’s medical content to be of surprisingly good quality, he was concerned—because he didn’t just find DrugBank copying and citing Wikipedia; he had also found several examples of Wikipedia likewise copying and citing DrugBank.”