BBC: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez sued over blocking people on Twitter

BBC: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez sued over blocking people on Twitter. “US Democratic congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is being sued for blocking people on Twitter. Former New York state assemblyman Dov Hikind and Joseph Saladino, a YouTube personality running for Congress, have filed the claims.”

Ars Technica: Trump’s Twitter blocks violate First Amendment rights, appeals court affirms

Ars Technica: Trump’s Twitter blocks violate First Amendment rights, appeals court affirms. “It’s one thing for most of us to block Twitter users who annoy us, but it’s a violation of those users’ First Amendment rights for the president to do so, a federal appeals court confirmed. The US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit on Tuesday issued an opinion supporting an earlier federal court ruling that as long as Donald Trump is a public official, he cannot block people (which prevents them from reading his feed or responding to his comments) he disagrees with on Twitter.”

Nieman Lab: Is it okay for a journalist to block a critic — not a troll, just a critic — on Twitter?

Nieman Lab: Is it okay for a journalist to block a critic — not a troll, just a critic — on Twitter?. “Blocking and muting on Twitter are common ways for users to deal with the less pleasant elements of the medium: trolls who attack, Nazis who incite, misinformation peddlers, and garden-variety jerks. And that’s certainly true of journalists, who come under far more abuse than the media Twitter user. But is blocking someone who is a respected member of the commentariat — and a frequent source for your news organization — okay if he’s tweeted something critical of you or your work?”

Quartz: US courts are figuring out if the government can block you on Facebook

Quartz: US courts are figuring out if the government can block you on Facebook. “In the last two years, there’s been a cascade of lawsuits in the US against public officials who have blocked people on social media and deleted critical comments. The list starts with the highest one in the country, president Donald Trump, and goes all the way down to a county board chair. As officials use social platforms more and more to communicate with their constituents, bypassing traditional media channels, the question of how they treat these avenues is becoming increasingly important.”

ProPublica: Governors and Federal Agencies Are Blocking Nearly 1,300 Accounts on Facebook and Twitter

ProPublica: Governors and Federal Agencies Are Blocking Nearly 1,300 Accounts on Facebook and Twitter. “Amanda Farber still doesn’t know why Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan blocked her from his Facebook group. A resident of Bethesda and full-time parent and volunteer, Farber identifies as a Democrat but voted for the Republican Hogan in 2014. Farber says she doesn’t post on her representatives’ pages often. But earlier this year, she said she wrote on the governor’s Facebook page, asking him to oppose the Trump administration’s travel ban and health care proposal. She never received a response. When she later returned to the page, she noticed her comment had been deleted. She also noticed she had been blocked from commenting. (She is still allowed to share the governor’s posts and messages.)”

Trump’s lawyers: Courts have no say over his Twitter feed (Daily Collegian)

Daily Collegian: Trump’s lawyers: Courts have no say over his Twitter feed. “President Donald Trump can block his critics from following him on Twitter without violating the First Amendment despite a lawsuit’s claims that it violates the Constitution to do so, government lawyers say. Trial attorneys with the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington submitted papers late Friday to a New York federal judge, saying a lawsuit challenging Trump over the issue should be thrown out.”

Slate: Trump Isn’t the Only Politician Blocking Constituents on Twitter

Slate: Trump Isn’t the Only Politician Blocking Constituents on Twitter. “As President Donald Trump faces criticism for blocking users on his Twitter account, people across the country say they, too, have been cut off by elected officials at all levels of government after voicing dissent on social media.”