Museum-iD: Unpacking 263,000 visitor photos at the Royal Ontario Museum

Museum-iD: Unpacking 263,000 visitor photos at the Royal Ontario Museum. “In a little over 4 years we have aggregated just over a quarter of a million photos shared by our visitors. 263,693 photos as of January 25th, 2018 to be exact. That is a lot user generated content (UGC) but is any of it meaningful? Can we use this as a data source to inform decision making? Are selfies really the scourge of the museum world like they are made out to be or are more people taking (collecting) photos of artifacts? Is there a benefit to encouraging visitors to share their photos? Do we need to incorporate digital engagement experiences into our exhibitions, or can we be more reactive? Below I’ll dig into these ideas and attempt to extract some meaningful information from this lot of UGC.”

BusinessCloud: Public Can Now Search [UK] Government’s Entire Digital Archive

BusinessCloud: Public Can Now Search Government’s Entire Digital Archive. “The British government’s entire online presence comprising billions of web pages has been indexed and digitally archived to the cloud for the first time. Manchester tech firm MirrorWeb has devised an all-new indexing to create an accessible, searchable and user-friendly resource for the public. The National Archives’ gigantic 120TB web archive encompasses billions of web pages – from every government department website and social media account – from 1996 to the present.”

FedScoop: Got a constituent question? This congressman wants a text

FedScoop: Got a constituent question? This congressman wants a text . “If you live in Arkansas’s 1st District, you can now text your member of Congress. Rep. Rick Crawford, R-Ark., is the first elected official on Capitol Hill to test a prototype of a new tool built by the OpenGov Foundation — Article One-txt.”

Bringing the Public Back In: Can the Comment Process Be Fixed? (New America)

New America: Bringing the Public Back In: Can the Comment Process Be Fixed?. “The public deserves a voice in the decisions we make as a democracy, including the regulations that govern our economy, foster competitive markets, and protect individual rights. In recent decades, the public comment process for agency decision-making has been the principal way in which government agencies understand and reflect the view of not only experts but average citizens whose lives will be affected by these choices. In order to participate meaningfully in decisions, citizens also need access to information about the agency and the data it has collected. But these processes—the public comment process, the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), and other transparency rules—are facing profound threats.”

The Irrawaddy (Myanmar): New Website Lets Public Track Legislation, ‘Vote’ on Bills

The Irrawaddy: New Website Lets Public Track Legislation, ‘Vote’ on Bills. “I AM A BILL, a new website that tracks legislation and monitors Parliament, was officially launched on Tuesday. The site provides the full history of every piece of legislation — from the date a bill is submitted to the lawmakers who submitted it and every debate it faces until it is pulled, rejected or approved…. Peace & Justice Myanmar, a local NGO, has been developing the site since May 2017 and by August hopes to have uploaded all bills introduced since February 2016, after the NLD was voted into power.”

Chicago Tribune: For elected officials in Northwest Indiana, social media serves as a help line and a sounding board

Chicago Tribune: For elected officials in Northwest Indiana, social media serves as a help line and a sounding board. “When I contacted Porter County Auditor Vicki Urbanik at 9:49 p.m. on a Tuesday, she was responding to a taxpayer via Facebook. The taxpayer sent Urbanik a message about a tax bill through the auditor’s Facebook page earlier that day. ‘Though I can’t access her tax information right now, I believe the issue deals with her assessed value, so I am explaining the appeal process,’ Urbanik told me.”