Public Radio East: Shark Spotting Citizen-Science Program Launches

Public Radio East: Shark Spotting Citizen-Science Program Launches. “The Spot A Shark USA program starts June 1. People who encounter sand tiger sharks are asked to upload their photos to the online database. Marine scientists will be able to use the pictures to identify individual sharks and track their movements, said South-East Zoo Alliance for Reproduction and Conservation Dr. Avery Paxton. “

NASA: Help NASA Create the Largest Landslide Database

NASA: Help NASA Create the Largest Landslide Database. “Landslides cause thousands of deaths and billions of dollars in property damage each year. Surprisingly, very few centralized global landslide databases exist, especially those that are publicly available. Now NASA scientists are working to fill the gap—and they want your help collecting information. In March 2018, NASA scientist Dalia Kirschbaum and several colleagues launched a citizen science project that will make it possible to report landslides you have witnessed, heard about in the news, or found on an online database. All you need to do is log into the Landslide Reporter portal and report the time, location, and date of the landslide—as well as your source of information.”

Larry Ferlazzo: National Geographic’s “Open Explorer” Lets Anyone Create Their Own Expedition

Larry Ferlazzo: National Geographic’s “Open Explorer” Lets Anyone Create Their Own Expedition. “National Geographic has just unveiled Open Explorer. They call it a ‘digital field journal’ where anyone can document their exploration of anything (they use ‘your backyard’ as one simple example), as well as follow the explorations of others (many are much more involved than a backyard).”

Gulf News: Citizen science volunteers to monitor and protect UAE’s coral reefs

Gulf News: Citizen science volunteers to monitor and protect UAE’s coral reefs. “The research is being led by Reef Check UAE and is part of a wider global effort that sees citizen scientists from around the world collecting data on the oceans’ coral reefs, with all the data and information being shared within the group’s global database, which is then used to compare the status of coral reefs in different parts of the world.”

NLM In Focus: NLM Community Mapping—Creating & Supporting Citizen Scientists, Communities

NLM In Focus: NLM Community Mapping—Creating & Supporting Citizen Scientists, Communities. “What if there were a low-cost way for the public to provide accurate scientific data about what’s happening in their community regarding environmental health challenges? There is, and NLM is helping to lead the way in this growing field. ‘Through the Community Health Maps initiative, our goal is to help communities collect and visualize information to support planning and decision making,’ said Colette Hochstein, DMD, MLS, of NLM’s Specialized Information Services.”

Popular Science: Scientists want YOU to help them study amphibious lil plants

Popular Science: Scientists want YOU to help them study amphibious lil plants. “Kalman Strauss is a 16-year-old high school sophomore in Chicago. He has been fascinated by bryophytes — eyelash-sized plants, such as mosses, liverworts, and hornworts — since he discovered them at age 12 while reading a botany textbook…. So he was ecstatic upon hearing he could become a citizen scientist for the Field Museum in Chicago and participate in an ongoing study focused on these tiny plants — specifically liverworts — to learn more about the impact of climate change. “

Earther: This New App Is Like Shazam for Your Nature Photos

Earther: This New App Is Like Shazam for Your Nature Photos. “In July of 2016, thousands of people wandered out into streets and parks under the guidance of a hugely popular wildlife app. The app was Pokemon Go, and the wildlife did not, in any real sense, exist. Yet while Pokemon fans were attempting to collect fantastic—if ultimately digital—animals, some inevitably found real ones as well… if you wanted an app that would mimic Pokemon Go but for existing species, you were largely out of luck. That changed in early March, when social media site iNaturalist released SEEK, an iOS app for people who want to search out local flora and fauna. The new app is part of an ongoing attempt to tempt people into citizen science—and to get them to see the wonder in species they might otherwise ignore.”