Wirral Globe: Lottery boost for Port Sunlight ‘Drawn Together’ online archive

Wirral Globe: Lottery boost for Port Sunlight ‘Drawn Together’ online archive. “The documents, including more than 4,000 original plans and detail drawings, illustrate founder William Lever’s vision for Port Sunlight, an industrial model village for his workers and the artistic and physical development, expansion and evolution of the village over a span of 70 years.”

Cities Today: New database released to better assess African cities

Cities Today: New database released to better assess African cities. “The most complete data set on African urban agglomerations has been launched during the 8th Africities Conference in Marrakesh. Africapolis includes data on more than 7,500 urban agglomerations in 50 countries and aims to become a tool for governments, policy makers, researchers and urban planners.”

New Online: Papers of Frederick Law Olmsted (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: New Online: Papers of Frederick Law Olmsted. “Frederick Law Olmsted (1822–1903) is most famous as the creator in the late 1850s of New York City’s Central Park with Calvert Vaux. But Olmsted had an enormous and geographically widespread impact on America’s lasting ideas of what cityscapes should be.”

University of British Columbia: Launch Of The Habitat Conferences Digital Archive

University of British Columbia: Launch Of The Habitat Conferences Digital Archive. “Held in Vancouver in 1976, The United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat I) was the largest UN conference then undertaken, the first to include a global NGO Forum and ultimately the birthplace of UN-Habitat. Habitat I was also the largest global event ever held in Vancouver at the time, catapulting the city onto the world’s stage. Habitat II, known as ‘The People’s Summit,’ took place in Istanbul twenty years later. Both conferences aimed to address human settlements issues in a rapidly urbanizing world.”

National Geographic: Maps Show How Tearing Down City Slums Displaced Thousands

National Geographic: Maps Show How Tearing Down City Slums Displaced Thousands. “Urban renewal projects changed the landscape of American cities in the 1950s and ‘60s. The federal government gave cities billions of dollars to tear down blighted areas and replace them with affordable housing. Or at least, that’s what was supposed to happen. In many places, there was a net loss of housing as city leaders decided instead to build offices or shopping malls, or to expand hospitals and universities. Urban renewal projects displaced more than 300,000 people between 1955 and 1966, and the burden fell disproportionately on people of color, according to a new analysis by the Digital Scholarship Lab at the University of Richmond, which has created a new website called Renewing Inequality packed with interactive maps and statistics on urban renewal projects.”

Builder Online: New Database Allows For Deep Inspection Of Cities, Towns And Neighborhoods

Builder Online: New Database Allows For Deep Inspection Of Cities, Towns And Neighborhoods. “A new interactive database created by the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, based in Cleveland, and PolicyMap allows users to visualize a broad array of indicators – housing prices, incomes, open space, or zoning and land use regulations, and more – revealing new insights on the makeup of states, cities, towns, and neighborhoods throughout the United States. The Place Database, unveiled at Meeting of the Minds, the annual conference spotlighting urban sustainability and connected technology, taps data from a variety of sources, such as the Environmental Protection Agency, Census Bureau, Internal Revenue Service, and National Conservation Easement Database, and assembles them for the first time all in one place.” I just need six hours or so to play with it.

Reuters: Uber opens up Paris travel database to help city planners

Reuters: Uber opens up Paris travel database to help city planners. “Uber said on Friday it would open up its trove of travel data in Paris to the public to help city officials and urban planners better understand transportation needs, as the company seeks to woo national authorities. The U.S. ride-hailing app collects huge amounts of data from the billions of trips taken by customers which it uses to improve its services and has recently started to make it available for a number of cities including Washington D.C., Sydney and Boston.”