BetaNews: Americans fear the COVID-19 crisis will lead to more government tracking

BetaNews: Americans fear the COVID-19 crisis will lead to more government tracking. “As COVID-19 has spread around the globe, governments everywhere have been taking extraordinary measures to try to contain the pandemic. There are fears though that some of these measures could become the new normal. The CyberNews.com website decided to ask people in the US how they feel about possibly giving up their privacy during the government’s response to the coronavirus. It finds that 79 percent are either somewhat worried or very worried that intrusive tracking measures enacted by the government could continue long after the pandemic has been defeated.”

The Atlantic: Would You Sacrifice Your Privacy to Get Out of Quarantine?

The Atlantic: Would You Sacrifice Your Privacy to Get Out of Quarantine?. “As general counsel of the NSA in the 1990s, Stewart Baker advocated for limiting the government’s intelligence-gathering powers in the name of civil liberties. Then the 9/11 attacks happened, and Baker concluded that the limits he’d supported contributed to the security lapse. So he began pushing the case for surveillance—first while serving as a member of the George W. Bush administration, then by writing op-eds, hosting podcasts, and sparring with opponents who believe that his proposals endanger fundamental rights. As the country struggles to contain the coronavirus, he thinks that many Americans will experience a conversion like his, becoming more willing to make sacrifices to their privacy.”

New York Times: The N.Y.P.D. Has 82,473 People in a DNA Database. Many Have No Idea.

New York Times: The N.Y.P.D. Has 82,473 People in a DNA Database. Many Have No Idea.. “About 31,400 of the DNA profiles in the city’s database came from people who were arrested or merely questioned in connection with a crime, but may not have been convicted, according to the Legal Aid Society, which obtained details about the database through a Freedom of Information Act request. One of those was the 12-year-old whose DNA was collected from a straw he used while talking to the police in March 2018. The felony charge against him was eventually dropped, but his DNA remained in the database for more than a year, his lawyer, Christine Bella, said.”

CBC: UBC prof helps create an online database of banned books

CBC: UBC prof helps create an online database of banned books. “A life-size replica of the Athenian Parthenon made of ‘banned books’ stands as a towering art installation in Kassel, Germany. The Parthenon of Book resides in the same spot where Nazi-sympathizers burned 2,000 prohibited books in 1933. Now, with the help of a UBC professor, the project has resulted in Die Kasseler Liste — an online searchable database of books that have been, or currently are, banned or censored somewhere in the world.”

The Guardian: Police super-database prompts Liberty warning on privacy

The Guardian: Police super-database prompts Liberty warning on privacy. “A new super-database being built for the police represents a ‘grave’ risk to privacy, a leading human rights group has said. Liberty claims the government is glossing over concerns that the database, the largest built for British law enforcement, threatens civil liberties. The group fears it gives massive power to the state at the expense of millions of Britons.”

Gale Digitizes American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) Papers (PRESS RELEASE)

Gale has digitized the archives of the American Civil Liberties Union (PRESS RELEASE). “Sourced from Princeton University and the ACLU, American Civil Liberties Union Papers, 1912-1990 contains more than 2 million pages of material. Included in the collection are internal documents such as memoranda and committee reports; correspondence from clients, members of the board of directors, government bureaucrats, attorneys, and other sources; materials relating to local organizations affiliated with the ACLU, as well as records of hundreds of organizations with which the ACLU had supportive or adversarial relations; and legal briefs and newspaper clippings.”