The big idea: City Club’s archives inspire one artist to create a video series on important moments (FreshWater Cleveland)

FreshWater Cleveland: The big idea: City Club’s archives inspire one artist to create a video series on important moments . “Theater artist Chris Szajbert found herself without a gig in 2020. She turned to an unlikely source for inspiration—the City Club of Cleveland archives, which feature racial justice activist Rosa Parks reflecting on why she refused to give up her seat to a white passenger at the front of a bus in Montgomery, Alabama in 1955; Cesar Chavez explaining how he united Latinx farm workers in a strike and 300-mile march against poor working conditions in California in 1965; Then-Senator Joseph R. Biden discussing campaign finance reform; and transgender activist Paula Stone Williams advancing transgender rights in the 2019.”

Digital Library of Georgia: Civil rights-era issues of Savannah’s leading African American newspaper, the Savannah Tribune, are now available freely online

Digital Library of Georgia: Civil rights-era issues of Savannah’s leading African American newspaper, the Savannah Tribune, are now available freely online. “The Digital Library of Georgia, in partnership with Live Oak Public Libraries, has made the Savannah Tribune (1943 to 1960) available for viewing at the Georgia Historic Newspapers website. The site provides access to these newspapers with full-text searching, browsing by date and title, and is compatible with all current browsers. The newspaper page images can be viewed without the use of plug-ins or additional software downloads. The archive is free and open for public use.”

Digital Library of Georgia: Urban planning, civil rights, and trends in landscape design in Savannah are highlighted in the newest collection available from the Digital Library of Georgia

Digital Library of Georgia: Urban planning, civil rights, and trends in landscape design in Savannah are highlighted in the newest collection available from the Digital Library of Georgia. “The historical significance of the collection may not be obvious at first, but Luciana Spracher, director for the City of Savannah Municipal Archives, describes its importance to contemporary research: ‘While on the surface the Park and Tree Commission Minutes might seem mundane, upon closer inspection they contain important information that reflects the intersections of urban planning and civil rights, trends in landscape design, development of Savannah’s cemeteries (both African American and white, since Savannah’s cemeteries were originally segregated), and details such as the use of convict labor in city infrastructure projects; all topics that draw on current socio-political trends and that are largely underrepresented in scholarship.’”

AP: Case files on 1964 civil rights worker killings made public

AP: Case files on 1964 civil rights worker killings made public. “The 1964 killings of civil rights activists James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner in Neshoba County sparked national outrage and helped spur passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. They later became the subject of the movie ‘Mississippi Burning.’” While the files have been made public, they have not yet been digitized.

Georgia State University: Georgia State Libraries Awarded National Grant To Digitize Historically Significant Labor and Civil Rights Materials

Georgia State University: Georgia State Libraries Awarded National Grant To Digitize Historically Significant Labor and Civil Rights Materials. “Georgia State University’s Libraries have received a $350,000 grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) to digitize and provide access to American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) Civil Rights Southeast Division and national-level records from the AFL, CIO and AFL-CIO Civil Rights Department.”

Color of Change presents The Pedestal Project: an AR experience envisioning racial justice leaders atop plinths left empty (Art Critique)

Art Critique: Color of Change presents The Pedestal Project: an AR experience envisioning racial justice leaders atop plinths left empty. “In cities across the US, empty pedestals are what remain after statues memorialising the Confederate side of the American Civil War were toppled or removed in recent months. Thus, the question has come of what to do with those empty plinths, but Color of Change has created The Pedestal Project, a temporary AR fix to what they hope will become a long-term solution.”

Creating a Web Collection for the exhibition – Unfinished Business: The Fight for Women’s Rights (British Library)

British Library: Creating a Web Collection for the exhibition – Unfinished Business: The Fight for Women’s Rights. “The core aim of the collection was to capture websites that reflect the activism around women’s rights online. From the beginning we also recognised that the scope for this collection was difficult to define and that sites relevant to this collection would come from many areas and would not focus solely on feminism, gender and women’s studies but also subjects such as family history, society and culture and welfare for example.”

Justice for Iran: Profiles of hundreds individual and tens institutional Iranian perpetrators released

Justice for Iran: Profiles of hundreds individual and tens institutional Iranian perpetrators released. “The database demonstrates profiles of only a part of hundreds of perpetrators of grave violations of human rights who have so far been identified by Justice for Iran. It consists of more than 220 individuals and a multitude of institutions that have been involved in more than 430 incidents of grave human rights violations. The current time frame spans across the past four decades, following the inception of the Islamic Republic of Iran. Amongst other rights, violations include 156 incidents of violations of the Right to Life against individuals or large groups of prisoners, 106 incidents of violations of the Right to Freedom of Assembly, and 62 incidents of violation of the Prohibition of Torture.”

530K Primary Resources Now Available Online through The Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement: A Digital Archive (Berkeley Library Update)

Berkeley Library Update: 530K Primary Resources Now Available Online through The Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement: A Digital Archive. “The Bancroft Library has recently completed the digitization of nearly 150,000 items related to the confinement of Japanese Americans during World War II as part of a two-year effort to select, prepare, and digitize these primary source records as part of a grant supported by the National Park Service’s Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program.”

The Verge: Civil rights groups move to block expansion of facial recognition in airports

The Verge: Civil rights groups move to block expansion of facial recognition in airports. “A coalition of civil rights groups led by the American Civil Liberties Union have filed an objection to the proposed expansion of Customs and Border Protections facial recognition at land and sea ports. The National Immigration Law Center, Fight for the Future, and the Electronic Frontier Foundation are also participating in the motion, alongside twelve others.”

University of New Mexico School of Law: UNM Law Professor Launches Website to Promote Teaching and Practice in Environmental Justice

University of New Mexico School of Law: UNM Law Professor Launches Website to Promote Teaching and Practice in Environmental Justice. “Through the new website, instructors, students, and practitioners in the field of environmental justice may find teaching materials (such as syllabi and exercises), reference materials (such as agency policies and guidance), video case studies, useful websites, and direct access to a number of GIS tools to facilitate community research from any laptop.”

Mashable: Activists demand Google open up about user data shared with police

Mashable: Activists demand Google open up about user data shared with police. “A coalition of 59 civil rights, labor, and civil society organizations sent an open letter to Google CEO Sundar Pichai Tuesday, demanding the company be more transparent when it comes to how often it complies with law enforcement requests for user data. What’s more, the letter signatories — which include the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Surveillance Technology Oversight Project, and the Brennan Center for Justice — want Google’s help in resisting what they see as the ‘alarming growth’ in searches carried out by law enforcement.”