Techdirt: Should Information Flows Be Controlled By The Internet Plumbers?

Techdirt: Should Information Flows Be Controlled By The Internet Plumbers?. “Content moderation is a can of worms. For Internet infrastructure intermediaries, it’s a can of worms that they are particularly poorly positioned to tackle. And yet Internet infrastructure elements are increasingly being called on to moderate content—content they may have very little insight into as it passes through their systems.”

Business Insider: A sheriff told a Wisconsin teenager to take down a COVID-19 Instagram post. A judge ruled it a First Amendment violation.

Business Insider: A sheriff told a Wisconsin teenager to take down a COVID-19 Instagram post. A judge ruled it a First Amendment violation.. “A Wisconsin teenager won a lawsuit against a sheriff and his deputy who allegedly threatened to have her jailed if she didn’t remove a social media post about her COVID-19 experience in March 2020, the Wausau Daily Herald reported. On Friday, US District Judge Brett Ludwig ruled that student Amyiah Cohoon’s free speech rights had been violated.”

Middle Tennessee State University: Free Speech Center offers teachers free Bill of Rights guide for Constitution Week

Middle Tennessee State University: Free Speech Center offers teachers free Bill of Rights guide for Constitution Week. “‘Each year teachers look for fresh resources to help teach young people about America’s core constitutional principles,’ said Ken Paulson, director of the center. ‘We’re pleased to provide free of charge a new and updated edition of the respected textbook “The Bill of Rights: The First Ten Amendments” written by Belmont University law professor and Constitutional scholar David Hudson.’ The book is intended for use in classes in grades 7 through 10, and gives both teachers and students a concise overview of Constitutional principles.”

Getty: Art and the Black Power Movement

Getty: Art and the Black Power Movement. “In 2017–2019, the landmark traveling exhibition Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power, shone a light on Black artists from the early 60s to the early 80s. A new expansive book conceived as a companion to this exhibition compiles hundreds of important texts from the era reflecting on the influence and power of Black art…. On September 9, the book’s editors, Mark Godfrey and Allie Biswas, will join Getty curator LeRonn P. Brooks for an online discussion about this cultural dialogue. They will explore the powerful ideas put forth by artists and writers who confronted questions of Black identity, activism, art, and social responsibility during the Black Power era.” Free and virtual (Zoom)

FBI: FBI Releases 2020 Hate Crime Statistics

FBI: FBI Releases 2020 Hate Crime Statistics. “Today the FBI released Hate Crime Statistics, 2020, the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program’s latest compilation about bias-motivated incidents throughout the nation. The 2020 data, submitted by 15,136 law enforcement agencies, provide information about the offenses, victims, offenders, and locations of hate crimes.”

Syracuse University: New Digital Exhibition Features Story of The Syracuse 8

Syracuse University: New Digital Exhibition Features Story of The Syracuse 8. “Syracuse University Libraries’ Special Collections Research Center recently released a new digital exhibition titled ‘A Courageous Stand: The Story of the Syracuse 8.’ The Syracuse 8 was a group of Black student-athletes who boycotted the University football program until it addressed their allegations of racism in 1970.”

Ayala: Mexican American Civil Rights Institute deserves continued local government support (San Antonio Express-News)

San Antonio Express-News: Ayala: Mexican American Civil Rights Institute deserves continued local government support. “The Mexican American Civil Rights Institute has driven home one idea in its short history: San Antonio is to Mexican American civil rights history what Atlanta is to Black civil rights history. While the latter is roundly recognized, San Antonio’s role as an activism mecca has not.”

CNET: Fortnite lets players re-live Martin Luther King Jr.’s ‘I Have a Dream’ speech

CNET: Fortnite lets players re-live Martin Luther King Jr.’s ‘I Have a Dream’ speech. “The experience, called March Through Time, will let players visit a ‘reimagined’ Washington, DC, of 1963. It will include collaborative quests and mini games, pop-up galleries, educational resources, ‘museum-inspired points of interest and historical imagery’ intended to give context to the speech, Fortnite said Thursday.”

Techdirt: Man Sues Multiple Social Media Services, Claims Banning His Accounts Violates The Civil Rights Act

Techdirt: Man Sues Multiple Social Media Services, Claims Banning His Accounts Violates The Civil Rights Act. “Everybody wants to sue social media platforms for (allegedly) violating the First Amendment by removing content that most platforms don’t feel compelled to host. Most of what’s sued over is a mixture of abusive trolling, misinformation, bigoted rhetoric, and harassment. Plaintiffs ignore the fact that private companies can’t violate the First Amendment. The First Amendment does not guarantee anyone the right to an audience or the continued use of someone’s services.”

South China Morning Post: Virtual Tiananmen Square museum crowdfunded by Hong Kong vigil organiser launches

South China Morning Post: Virtual Tiananmen Square museum crowdfunded by Hong Kong vigil organiser launches. “The online museum offers a timeline of the 1989 student-led pro-democracy movement in Beijing, including the subsequent crackdown and its aftermath. It also provides a list of those killed, injured and forced to go into exile. The website dedicates a chapter to Hong Kong’s role in backing the student movement and later commemorating the crackdown over the past three decades.” The museum is currently in Chinese only, but more languages are expected.

The big idea: City Club’s archives inspire one artist to create a video series on important moments (FreshWater Cleveland)

FreshWater Cleveland: The big idea: City Club’s archives inspire one artist to create a video series on important moments . “Theater artist Chris Szajbert found herself without a gig in 2020. She turned to an unlikely source for inspiration—the City Club of Cleveland archives, which feature racial justice activist Rosa Parks reflecting on why she refused to give up her seat to a white passenger at the front of a bus in Montgomery, Alabama in 1955; Cesar Chavez explaining how he united Latinx farm workers in a strike and 300-mile march against poor working conditions in California in 1965; Then-Senator Joseph R. Biden discussing campaign finance reform; and transgender activist Paula Stone Williams advancing transgender rights in the 2019.”

Digital Library of Georgia: Civil rights-era issues of Savannah’s leading African American newspaper, the Savannah Tribune, are now available freely online

Digital Library of Georgia: Civil rights-era issues of Savannah’s leading African American newspaper, the Savannah Tribune, are now available freely online. “The Digital Library of Georgia, in partnership with Live Oak Public Libraries, has made the Savannah Tribune (1943 to 1960) available for viewing at the Georgia Historic Newspapers website. The site provides access to these newspapers with full-text searching, browsing by date and title, and is compatible with all current browsers. The newspaper page images can be viewed without the use of plug-ins or additional software downloads. The archive is free and open for public use.”

Digital Library of Georgia: Urban planning, civil rights, and trends in landscape design in Savannah are highlighted in the newest collection available from the Digital Library of Georgia

Digital Library of Georgia: Urban planning, civil rights, and trends in landscape design in Savannah are highlighted in the newest collection available from the Digital Library of Georgia. “The historical significance of the collection may not be obvious at first, but Luciana Spracher, director for the City of Savannah Municipal Archives, describes its importance to contemporary research: ‘While on the surface the Park and Tree Commission Minutes might seem mundane, upon closer inspection they contain important information that reflects the intersections of urban planning and civil rights, trends in landscape design, development of Savannah’s cemeteries (both African American and white, since Savannah’s cemeteries were originally segregated), and details such as the use of convict labor in city infrastructure projects; all topics that draw on current socio-political trends and that are largely underrepresented in scholarship.’”

AP: Case files on 1964 civil rights worker killings made public

AP: Case files on 1964 civil rights worker killings made public. “The 1964 killings of civil rights activists James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner in Neshoba County sparked national outrage and helped spur passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. They later became the subject of the movie ‘Mississippi Burning.’” While the files have been made public, they have not yet been digitized.