Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources: New tool to preserve historic resources from the African American Civil Rights journey in Nevada

Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources: New tool to preserve historic resources from the African American Civil Rights journey in Nevada. “Whether it is the site of the 1910 Johnson-Jeffries fight in Reno that established Nevada as a live-entertainment destination, or the Harrison House in Las Vegas where African-American performers stayed in the era of segregation, the State of Nevada is home to many iconic buildings and landmarks that have helped shape the story of the Civil Rights Movement in the Silver State. Beyond the most well-known locations, there are many that are yet to be discovered. Commissioned in 2019 and funded by the National Park Service, ‘The African American Civil Rights Experience in Nevada, 1900-1979’ cultural resource guide is now available to help identify significant historic events and locations throughout Nevada that played an integral role in the African American pursuit of civil rights.”

Library of Congress: The March on Washington in Color

Library of Congress / Unsplash Guest Post: The March on Washington in Color. “[August 28] marks the 57th anniversary of the March on Washington—when a quarter-million people came together to draw attention to the continued challenges and inequalities faced by Black Americans. The two dozen or so color photographs from that day and its leaders are locked down under expensive licenses, inaccessible to the general public, limiting the usage and awareness of one of the most defining moments in American history. Today, we fix this. With the help of the team at the Library and visual historian Jordan Lloyd, we’ve assembled a set of images with no known restrictions from the March, its leaders and segregated America.”

Penn State News: Libraries virtual exhibition highlights 100 years of national disability rights

Penn State News: Libraries virtual exhibition highlights 100 years of national disability rights. “To coincide with the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), a new online exhibition, ‘Celebrating the ADA: The Legacy and Evolution of Disability Rights & Lived Experience at Penn State,’ explores the first 100 years of national disability rights legislation and the movement’s impact on the Penn State community.”

Voice of America: US Global Internet Freedom Group Says Work Limited by Funding Dispute

Voice of America: US Global Internet Freedom Group Says Work Limited by Funding Dispute. “A U.S.-funded global internet freedom group says it has had to sharply curtail its work in a new funding dispute with the U.S. Agency for Global Media (USAGM). Laura Cunningham, the acting chief executive of the Washington-based Open Technology Fund, in a letter… accused the agency and its leader, Michael Pack, of withholding $20 million in congressionally approved funds intended to promote internet access throughout the world, especially in such authoritarian countries as China and Iran.”

Business Wire: Iron Mountain and CyArk Commemorate 100th Anniversary of Women’s Right to Vote, Digitally Preserving the Birthplace of the Women’s Rights and Suffrage Movement (PRESS RELEASE)

Business Wire: Iron Mountain and CyArk Commemorate 100th Anniversary of Women’s Right to Vote, Digitally Preserving the Birthplace of the Women’s Rights and Suffrage Movement (PRESS RELEASE). “Iron Mountain Incorporated, the storage and information management services company, and CyArk, a heritage preservation non-profit, announced they have digitally preserved three properties at the Women’s Rights National Historic Park: the Elizabeth Stanton House, Richard P. Hunt and Jane C. Hunt House and Wesleyan Chapel. This preservation initiative celebrates the movement’s founding members and commemorates the 100th anniversary of the 19th Constitutional Amendment ratification, guaranteeing women the right to vote…. Through new, online guided tours, visitors can now explore the sites by virtually navigating through the property models while experts provide voiceover commentary on historical highlights.”

CNET: Twenty state AGs press Facebook to do more to combat hate speech

CNET: Twenty state AGs press Facebook to do more to combat hate speech. “In a letter to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg on Wednesday, the AGs said they believed the company had ‘fallen short’ on its civil rights record and urged the company to ‘aggressively enforce’ its policies prohibiting hate speech and hate-based organizations. Other steps the AGs’ letter suggested Facebook take include allowing public, third-party audits of hate content and enforcement, as well as expanding its policies on limiting ads that disparage minorities.”

Mental Floss: Explore Marian Anderson’s Handwritten Letters, Private Recordings, and More in a Newly Digitized Collection

Mental Floss: Explore Marian Anderson’s Handwritten Letters, Private Recordings, and More in a Newly Digitized Collection. “More than 2500 items of archival material, including letters, diaries, journals, interviews, scrapbooks, performance programs, and private recordings, are available to view online through a research portal called ‘Discovering Marian Anderson.’ Many of the manuscripts were donated by Anderson, who was born and raised in Philadelphia, before she died at age 96 in 1993.”

Ayala: Making Mexican American civil rights history ‘part of a national conversation’ (San Antonio Express-News)

San Antonio Express-News: Ayala: Making Mexican American civil rights history ‘part of a national conversation’. “The extraordinary events of 2020 also accelerated the [Mexican American Civil Rights Institute’s] digital game plan — long term, it wants to be a national hub of Mexican American civil rights archives. Leaders said the pandemic, which made digital connections that much more essential, fostered a re-imagining of the institute’s online presence. Next month, it will unveil its first website, a 1.0 version. A second is already in the works. The goal is a ‘robust’ digital archive.”

New York Times: Facebook Fails to Appease Organizers of Ad Boycott

New York Times: Facebook Fails to Appease Organizers of Ad Boycott. “Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s two top executives, met with civil rights groups on Tuesday in an attempt to mollify them over how the social network treats hate speech on its site. But Mr. Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, and Ms. Sandberg, the chief operating officer, failed to win its critics over.”

BBC: Facebook civil-rights record hammered in own review

BBC: Facebook civil-rights record hammered in own review. “Facebook’s civil-rights policy is ‘too reactive and piecemeal’, leaving activists ‘frustrated and angry’, an audit commissioned by the company says. Details from a draft copy of the review, due to be published later, have been revealed by the New York Times. Facebook has already said it will not make ‘every change’ called for in the 100-page report.” And it’s Facebook’s own audit.

AP: Courts straining to balance public health with public access

AP: Courts straining to balance public health with public access. “After her son was arrested for allegedly throwing rocks at police during a protest over racial injustice, Tanisha Brown headed to the courthouse in her California hometown to watch her son’s arraignment. She was turned away, told the courthouse was closed to the public because of coronavirus precautions. A day later, the Kern County Superior Court in Bakersfield posted a notice on its website explaining how the public could request special permission from judicial officers to attend court proceedings. But problems with public access have persisted, according to a federal lawsuit filed Friday on behalf of Brown and several others who have been unable to watch court sessions.”

Observer: Feeling Heat, Mark Zuckerberg Will Meet With Civil Rights Groups Boycotting Facebook

Observer: Feeling Heat, Mark Zuckerberg Will Meet With Civil Rights Groups Boycotting Facebook. “While the boycott may not make a significant dent in the company’s income, global brands such as Pepsi and Coca-Cola publicly calling for the platform to change is a big deal. And after a team of top Facebook executives failed to talk those advertisers out of it, CEO Mark Zuckerberg finally agreed to meet with the civil rights groups behind the boycott and hear what they want, a spokesperson confirmed to Reuters late Tuesday.”

New York Times: How Social Media Has Changed Civil Rights Protests

New York Times: How Social Media Has Changed Civil Rights Protests. “Omar Wasow is steeped in both social media and the civil rights movement of the 1960s. And he marvels at how the two have melded in the current demonstrations against racial injustice and police brutality. Wasow, a professor at Princeton University and co-founder of the pioneering social network BlackPlanet.com, said social media was helping publicize police brutality and galvanizing public support for protesters’ goals — a role that his research found conventional media played a half century ago. And he said he believed that the internet was making it easier to organize social movements today, for good and for ill.”

AdWeek: Civil Rights Groups Urge Large Facebook Advertisers to Boycott the Platform in July

AdWeek: Civil Rights Groups Urge Large Facebook Advertisers to Boycott the Platform in July. “Six civil rights groups have organized a social media boycott effort against Facebook, calling on media buyers, planners and brands to stop advertising next month unless the social network takes steps to curb the proliferation of hate on its platform. The group was formed by the Anti-Defamation League, Color of Change, Common Sense Media, Free Press, the NAACP and Sleeping Giants, and is spreading its cause under the hashtag #StopHateForProfit.”

U.S. Department of Justice: Department of Justice Announces Launch of Civil Rights Reporting Portal

U.S. Department of Justice: Department of Justice Announces Launch of Civil Rights Reporting Portal. “The new Civil Rights Reporting Portal – located at civilrights.justice.gov – will consolidate over 30 unique reporting pathways. The portal will dramatically ease the burden on victims of civil rights violations to identify the proper reporting channel. The form is fully accessible to people with disabilities. It is also available in both English and Spanish, with more languages to be added over the next year.”