Reuters: U.S. accuses China of ‘super aggressive’ spy campaign on LinkedIn

Reuters: U.S. accuses China of ‘super aggressive’ spy campaign on LinkedIn. “The United States’ top spy catcher said Chinese espionage agencies are using fake LinkedIn accounts to try to recruit Americans with access to government and commercial secrets, and the company should shut them down.”

The Guardian: Hong Kong democracy activists urge UK to release unseen files

The Guardian: Hong Kong democracy activists urge UK to release unseen files. “The documents were transferred to the UK when Hong Kong returned to China in 1997 and include material on the region’s future after handover. Activists believe they could cast fresh light on current disputes and also fear that records on events that Beijing deems sensitive – such as deadly riots in 1967 – could otherwise be lost forever.”

The Guardian: Fitness tracking app Strava gives away location of secret US army bases

The Guardian: Fitness tracking app Strava gives away location of secret US army bases. “Sensitive information about the location and staffing of military bases and spy outposts around the world has been revealed by a fitness tracking company. The details were released by Strava in a data visualisation map that shows all the activity tracked by users of its app, which allows people to record their exercise and share it with others.”

The Intercept: NYU Accidentally Exposed Military Code-breaking Computer Project To Entire Internet

The Intercept: NYU Accidentally Exposed Military Code-breaking Computer Project To Entire Internet. “In early December 2016, Adam was doing what he’s always doing, somewhere between hobby and profession: looking for things that are on the internet that shouldn’t be. That week, he came across a server inside New York University’s famed Institute for Mathematics and Advanced Supercomputing, headed by the brilliant Chudnovsky brothers, David and Gregory. The server appeared to be an internet-connected backup drive. But instead of being filled with family photos and spreadsheets, this drive held confidential information on an advanced code-breaking machine that had never before been described in public. Dozens of documents spanning hundreds of pages detailed the project, a joint supercomputing initiative administered by NYU, the Department of Defense, and IBM. And they were available for the entire world to download.”

The Atlantic: The Government’s Secret Wiki for Intelligence

The Atlantic: The Government’s Secret Wiki for Intelligence. “That site, called Intellipedia, has been around for more than a decade. It’s made up of three different wikis, at different classification levels: one wiki for sensitive but unclassified information, another for secret information, and a third for top secret information. Each wiki can only be accessed by employees in the U.S. intelligence community’s 17 agencies who have the appropriate clearance level.”