E&E News: Denial expands on Facebook as scientists face restrictions

E&E News: Denial expands on Facebook as scientists face restrictions. “A climate scientist says Facebook is restricting her ability to share research and fact-check posts containing climate misinformation. Those constraints are occuring as groups that reject climate science increasingly use the platform to promote misleading theories about global warming. The groups are using Facebook to mischaracterize mainstream research by claiming that reduced consumption of fossil fuels won’t help address climate change. Some say the planet and people are benefitting from the rising volume of carbon dioxide that’s being released into the atmosphere.”

Intelligent Transport: ITF launches Transport Climate Action Directory

Intelligent Transport: ITF launches Transport Climate Action Directory. ITF is the International Transport Forum. “The Directory aims to provide decision makers with a range of options that can deliver concrete decarbonisation outcomes for transport in their specific national context, helping them to translate their decarbonisation ambitions into actions. It specifically aims to support countries in the upcoming first revision of their nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) for the 2021 Conference of Parties (COP26) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).”

Silicon Republic: NASA, ESA and JAXA’s new tool shows our climate changed by Covid-19

Silicon Republic: NASA, ESA and JAXA’s new tool shows our climate changed by Covid-19. “NASA, ESA and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) have unveiled a new tool designed to give researchers and policymakers access to planet-wide changes in the environment and human society following the largest pandemic in a generation. The Covid-19 Earth Observation Dashboard integrates multiple satellite data records with analytical tools to allow user-friendly tracking of changes in air and water quality, climate change, economic activity, and agriculture.”

Scoop New Zealand: UN, Google Arts & Culture Announce ‘Heartbeat Of The Earth’ – An Artistic Take On Climate Data

Scoop New Zealand: UN, Google Arts & Culture Announce ‘Heartbeat Of The Earth’ – An Artistic Take On Climate Data. “On World Environment Day (June 5), UN Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Google Arts & Culture Lab residency program announce ‘Heartbeat of the Earth’, a series of experimental artworks inspired by climate data. Five artists—Cristina Tarquini, Fabian Oefner, Laurie Frick, Timo Aho & Pekka Niittyvirta—used key findings from the UN’s landmark 2018 IPCC report and data from scientific institutions, including the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the World Meteorological Organization, to create four interactive art pieces about our climate. They’ve addressed the topics of declining ocean life, food consumption, melting glaciers and rising sea levels.”

WUWM: New Database Helps Scientists Track Climate Change Over Thousands Of Years

WUWM: New Database Helps Scientists Track Climate Change Over Thousands Of Years. “The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released a new database earlier this month. It’s called Nature’s Archives, and NOAA says it’s the most comprehensive temperature change database ever assembled. Paul Roebber, a UWM distinguished professor of atmospheric science, says NOAA’s data gives context to changes climate scientists are observing.”

Penn State News: Libraries virtual exhibition highlights human impact on our planet

Penn State News: Libraries virtual exhibition highlights human impact on our planet. “The virtual exhibition invites the viewer to consider a range of environmental-related topics and will serve as a growing, centralized resource for the Libraries’ rich trove of primary sources focused around key issues and themes: Climate Change and Weather Data, Energy and Extraction History, Environmental Disasters and Pollution, Arctic Exploration, Eco-Materiality and Future Speculations, Biodiversity, and Environmental Protection and Activism.”

Fast Company: This site shows your home’s disaster risk, from climate to coronavirus

Fast Company: This site shows your home’s disaster risk, from climate to coronavirus. “If you want to move to avoid the impacts of climate change, you may be out of luck: Everywhere on Earth will be affected. But some places are safer than others. A new tool from a startup called Augurisk is designed to help homebuyers and business owners calculate the climate risks of any address in the U.S.—along with multiple other risks, from nuclear power plant radiation to the current spread of COVID-19 and the ability of local hospitals to handle the pandemic.”

Washington Post: Global emissions plunged an unprecedented 17 percent during the coronavirus pandemic

Washington Post: Global emissions plunged an unprecedented 17 percent during the coronavirus pandemic. “As covid-19 infections surged in March and April, nations around the globe experienced an abrupt reduction in driving, flying and industrial output, leading to a startling decline of more than a billion tons of carbon dioxide emissions. That includes a peak decline in daily emissions of 17 percent in early April, according to the study published in the journal Nature Climate Change. For some nations, the drop was much steeper.”

Climate change’s toll on freshwater fish: A new database for science (ScienceDaily)

ScienceDaily: Climate change’s toll on freshwater fish: A new database for science. “The Fish and Climate Change Database — or FiCli (pronounced ”fick-lee”) — is a searchable directory of peer-reviewed journal publications that describe projected or documented effects of climate change on inland fishes. Researchers, fisheries managers, conservationists, journalists and others can use FiCli to find scientific articles.”

USGS: New Land Cover Maps Depict 15 Years of Alaska Change

USGS: New Land Cover Maps Depict 15 Years of Alaska Change. “The Alaska data amount to the most up-to-date and comprehensive land cover map ever produced for the largest U.S. state in the Union, offering critical insight into some of North America’s most rapidly- and dramatically-changing landscapes…. As with NLCD 2016’s CONUS data products, the Alaska land cover maps depict 15 years of change, from 2001-2016.”

Waging Nonviolence: For climate activists, coronavirus lockdown means more time to organize

Waging Nonviolence: For climate activists, coronavirus lockdown means more time to organize. “The responses to these earlier disruptions suggest that — in an emergency — the climate movement can adapt very quickly to new circumstances. However, the effects of COVID-19 are much wider reaching than either of those earlier events and have impacted climate organizing all over the world to a far greater degree. The barriers to building a mass movement when large street mobilizations are impossible are very real. But for a movement led largely by young people — the most internet-savvy generation in history — keeping the momentum going without being able to meet in person may not be quite as difficult as it seems.”

Data science vs social media disinformation: the case of climate change and the Australian bushfires (ZDNet)

ZDNet: Data science vs social media disinformation: the case of climate change and the Australian bushfires . “Today, [World Weather Attribution] just released an analysis on the recent Australian bushfires, and ZDNet connected with WWA to learn more about it. At the same time, another analysis by the Brown university verifies what previous studies suggested: climate disinformation on social media abounds. The battle between bots and (data) science is raging.”

Eye on the Arctic: Archeologists create digital blueprints of historic sites on Canadian Arctic island

Eye on the Arctic: Archeologists create digital blueprints of historic sites on Canadian Arctic island. “The impacts of climate change can be hard to notice on an incremental basis, but when archeologist Peter Dawson stepped off a Twin Otter aircraft onto Yukon’s Herschel Island after a decades-long absence, there was nothing subtle about what he saw.”

The Fifth Estate: New digital library helps financiers dig deeper into sustainability

The Fifth Estate: New digital library helps financiers dig deeper into sustainability. “There has been plenty of talk recently about a sea change in attitudes regarding climate-related financial risks but making the business case for sustainable finance isn’t always easy. Responsible investment expert Pablo Berrutti is hoping to change that with a not-for-profit digital library and resource centre that will help people understand the role finance must play in addressing sustainability challenges.”