Environmental Analyst: Subak launches ‘Google of climate data’ portal

Environmental Analyst: Subak launches ‘Google of climate data’ portal. “Global tech accelerator Subak (which claims to be ‘the world’s first not-for-profit accelerator and data community’) has launched the Data Catalogue – a curated online portal connecting shared climate datasets around the world. The online catalogue has been built to make climate data reliable and accessible for academics, analysts, policymakers and corporations working to identify climate risks and opportunities, and measure decarbonisation efforts.”

Spotted via Google Alerts: Hawaiʻi Climate Data Portal

This is one of those resources that I learn about from a firmly-paywalled article, careen around looking for more details and a non-paywalled source, don’t find one, and give up with a Spotted via Google Alerts: Hawaiʻi Climate Data Portal. It’s apparently officially launching later today. From the home page: “The overarching goal of the HCDP is to provide streamlined access to high-quality reliable climate data and information for the State Of Hawai‘i. This includes the production of both near-real-time monthly rainfall and daily temperature maps and a user-friendly tool to visualize and download them. Easy access to high quality climate data, information and products through the HCDP allows researchers to focus more time on their analyses and less time on data collection and processing.”

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Drought Center creates tool that could help detect emerging impacts by tracking news

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Drought Center creates tool that could help detect emerging impacts by tracking news. “When drought develops somewhere across the country, news reports often chronicle its effects on that area. These reports can be vital resources in trying to understand the impact of drought in the U.S., said National Drought Mitigation Center assistant director Kelly Health. The Drought Center has developed a mostly automated news search process for drought impacts, and is mapping and qualifying the results. The experiential Media Drought Index (MDI), now available to the public, may help detect emerging impacts, said Smith, who led its development.”

Wired: Citizen Scientists Digitized Centuries of Handwritten Rain Data

Wired: Citizen Scientists Digitized Centuries of Handwritten Rain Data. “IN MARCH 2020, as the United Kingdom went into pandemic lockdown, climate scientist Ed Hawkins put out a call to people with time on their hands: He needed help turning nearly 350 years’ worth of archival rainfall reports into digital documents that modern researchers could easily use. To his surprise, 16,000 people volunteered…. Now, just over a year later, his group has released their work, a massive data set of upwards of 5 million observations extracted from the UK Meteorological Office’s paper records—the oldest dating to 1677.”

Vegetation of planet Earth: Researchers publish unique database as Open Access (Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg)

Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg: Vegetation of planet Earth: Researchers publish unique database as Open Access. “It’s a treasure trove of data: the global geodatabase of vegetation plots ‘sPlotOpen’ is now freely accessible. It contains data on vegetation from 114 countries and from all climate zones on Earth. The database was compiled by an international team of researchers led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS).”

Environmental Defense Fund: New Group Calls on SEC to Strengthen Climate Protections for U.S. Financial System

Environmental Defense Fund: New Group Calls on SEC to Strengthen Climate Protections for U.S. Financial System. “Experts with the brand new Initiative on Climate Risk and Resilience Law (ICRRL) are calling on the Securities and Exchange Commission to strengthen protections from the dangers of climate change to our nation’s financial system and the millions of people who rely on it to sustain the American economy.”

University at Albany: PIRE Researchers Launch New Tool to Visualize Global Climate Change

University at Albany: PIRE Researchers Launch New Tool to Visualize Global Climate Change. “A new tool developed through the University at Albany Visualization and Informatics Lab (AVAIL) is offering an interactive way to view up to two millennium’s worth of paleoclimate data around the globe. The tool, a result of UAlbany’s ongoing $5 million Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) CREATE project funded through the National Science Foundation, includes three visualization maps, all of which are available now to the public.”

Phys .org: Los Angeles and Google partner on ‘Tree Canopy’ project

Phys .org: Los Angeles and Google partner on ‘Tree Canopy’ project. “Los Angeles and Google have struck a partnership to track canopy density in the huge metropolis to determine which neighborhoods need more trees as a means of fighting extreme temperatures. Vegetation, notably tree canopy coverage, plays a key role in offering the kind of relief that Los Angeles needs: The city is the state’s biggest urban heat island thanks in no small part to thousands of miles of roads and parking spaces.”

Aberdeen News: Website’s new weather tool to aid farmers in 12 states

Aberdeen News: Website’s new weather tool to aid farmers in 12 states. “Iowa State University Extension and Outreach has debuted a new tool on the Forecast and Assessment of Cropping Systems (FACTS) website that displays weather summaries for every crop reporting district in 12 Midwest states. The weather summaries include data from 1984 through today, updated every month and with information on temperature, precipitation, radiation and other weather indicators — like the number of days with extreme weather rain events, or the number of warm nights.”

NOAA Climate Program Office: Alaska RISA launches Alaska Statewide Temperature Index Tool

NOAA Climate Program Office: Alaska RISA launches Alaska Statewide Temperature Index Tool. “Built in collaboration with the Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning, the new tool uses a statewide temperature index developed by ACCAP Climate Specialist Rick Thoman, and NOAA Climatologist Brian Brettschneider. The index uses daily temperature data from 25 Automated Surface Observation System stations maintained by the National Weather Service. Daily indices can then be compared to a baseline of average temperature data from 1981 to 2010. The project team hopes that this tool can help clarify the complex topic of Alaska temperature.”

North Carolina State University: Climate Thresholds Tool Offers Historical Stats About Extreme Events

North Carolina State University, go Wolfpack, and we miss you Kay Yow: Climate Thresholds Tool Offers Historical Stats About Extreme Events. “They’re the sort of climatological curiosities that may have crossed your mind this year without even realizing it. In the Sandhills: Wow, 90 degrees before March is done? Here comes the sun! In the Foothills: A freeze in mid-May? No way! And in eastern North Carolina last month: Four inches of rain in one day? Don’t float away! If recent weather has left you wondering about the rarity of such events, or if you’re planning ahead for what sort of conditions you might expect at a different time of year, our relaunched and refreshed Climate Thresholds tool can provide the answers.”

Scoop New Zealand: UN, Google Arts & Culture Announce ‘Heartbeat Of The Earth’ – An Artistic Take On Climate Data

Scoop New Zealand: UN, Google Arts & Culture Announce ‘Heartbeat Of The Earth’ – An Artistic Take On Climate Data. “On World Environment Day (June 5), UN Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Google Arts & Culture Lab residency program announce ‘Heartbeat of the Earth’, a series of experimental artworks inspired by climate data. Five artists—Cristina Tarquini, Fabian Oefner, Laurie Frick, Timo Aho & Pekka Niittyvirta—used key findings from the UN’s landmark 2018 IPCC report and data from scientific institutions, including the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the World Meteorological Organization, to create four interactive art pieces about our climate. They’ve addressed the topics of declining ocean life, food consumption, melting glaciers and rising sea levels.”

WUWM: New Database Helps Scientists Track Climate Change Over Thousands Of Years

WUWM: New Database Helps Scientists Track Climate Change Over Thousands Of Years. “The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released a new database earlier this month. It’s called Nature’s Archives, and NOAA says it’s the most comprehensive temperature change database ever assembled. Paul Roebber, a UWM distinguished professor of atmospheric science, says NOAA’s data gives context to changes climate scientists are observing.”

Coronavirus News: Warmer weather, humidity and COVID-19 (WTVD)

WTVD: Coronavirus News: Warmer weather, humidity and COVID-19. “While COVID-19 has been spreading like wildfire in locations like Italy and New York, other areas have seen a much more gradual uptick in cases. Public health policy may very well be stemming the tide of the virus in those places, but the weather could also be playing a role. An early analysis by scientists at MIT has found that the novel coronavirus is spreading more slowly in warmer and more humid climates. At least two other studies have drawn a similar conclusion, including one conducted in China before the aggressive lockdown began.” This is a note of hope, not a license to go outside and be stupid.