San Diego State University: Climate Data at Your Fingertips

San Diego State University: Climate Data at Your Fingertips . “While Julien Pierret was conducting research for his Ph.D. in climate data, he was playing around with a web graphics library and looking for a reason to learn about it. ‘I’m a child when it comes to exploring different tools and wanted to incorporate this into my Ph.D.,’ he admitted. His exploration eventually evolved into a web-based tool – four-dimensional visual delivery or 4DVD – that offers convenient, open access to climate data for regions across the world. “

Phys .org: Want to know what climate change will do in your backyard? There’s a dataset for that

Phys .org: Want to know what climate change will do in your backyard? There’s a dataset for that. “What the global climate emergency has in store may vary from one back yard to the next, particularly in the tropics where microclimates, geography and land-use practices shift dramatically over small areas. This has major implications for adaptation strategies at local levels and requires trustworthy, high-resolution data on plausible future climate scenarios. A dataset created by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) and colleagues is filling this niche.”

Ensia: How can we adapt to climate change? This online hub has answers

New-to-me, from Ensia: How can we adapt to climate change? This online hub has answers. “Even as we strive to stop the globe from getting hotter still in order to avoid another ‘lost decade,’ we’ll also have to adjust to changes already happening. The good news: There’s no need to start from scratch, thanks to the Climate Adaptation Knowledge Exchange (CAKE), a collection of more than 2,000 vetted resources on climate adaptation compiled since 2010 by EcoAdapt, a nonprofit based in Washington state.”

Big data, big world: new NOAA datasets available on Google Cloud (Google Cloud)

Google Cloud: Big data, big world: new NOAA datasets available on Google Cloud. “A vast trove of NOAA’s environmental data is now available on Google Cloud as part of the Google Cloud Public Datasets Program and NOAA’s Big Data Project, opening up possibilities for scientific and economic advances. We are thrilled to make this valuable data available for your exploration. Google Cloud will host 5 PB of this data across our products, including BigQuery, Cloud Storage, Google Earth Engine, and Kaggle. The stored data is available at no cost, though usual charges may still apply (processing, egress of user-owned data, for example).”

Phys .org: Professor creates climate data visualization tool that can reveal changes in atmosphere in real time

Phys .org: Professor creates climate data visualization tool that can reveal changes in atmosphere in real time. “PolarGlobe is a large-scale, web-based four-dimensional visualization tool allowing climate data access to anyone with an internet connection. It’s capable of illustrating changes in the atmosphere vividly in real time. Designed specifically for polar scientists seeking to understand the ice caps, the tool is also useful for high school science teachers and weather fanatics.”

Phys .org: Updated California Climate Tracker tool provides more than 120 years of climate data

Phys .org: Updated California Climate Tracker tool provides more than 120 years of climate data. “Originally launched in 2009, the California Climate Tracker was designed to support climate monitoring in California and allows users to generate maps and graphs of temperature and precipitation by region. The 2018 upgrade incorporates substantial improvements including a more user-friendly web interface, improved accuracy of information based on PRISM data, and access to climate maps and data that go back more than 120 years, to 1895.”

EOS: Five Weird Archives That Scientists Use to Study Past Climates

EOS: Five Weird Archives That Scientists Use to Study Past Climates. “Long-lived trees aren’t necessarily found everywhere. You can’t take an ice core in a desert. As a result, evidence for climate fluctuations on local and regional scales is lacking around the world. To solve this puzzle, scientists get creative. They’re examining nature for whatever they can find that lays down layer after layer over a large chunk of time in relatively undisturbed environments. And in the process, they’ve stumbled on some new, intriguing archives. Here are five of the weirdest ones we’ve found.” Aqueducts! Whale earwax!