TNW: How to build an AI stylist inspired by outfits on Instagram

TNW: How to build an AI stylist inspired by outfits on Instagram. “My AI Stylist was half based on this smart closet from the movie Clueless… and half based on the idea that one way to dress fashionably is to copy fashionable people. Particularly, fashionable people on Instagram. The app pulls in the Instagram feeds of a bunch of fashion ‘influencers’ on Instagram and combines them with pictures of clothing you already own to recommend you outfits.”

Dazed: Elise by Olsen has launched a fashion research library

Dazed: Elise by Olsen has launched a fashion research library. “Launching today (October 15), the digital library includes more than 5,000 pieces of contemporary printed documents and artefacts, including books, magazines, lookbooks, show invitations, and illustrations from the likes of Acne, Comme des Garçons, Issey Miyake, Larry Clark, Martin Margiela, Nan Goldin, and more. The collection will keep growing through ongoing donations from fashion houses and publishers.” The archive is free to access.

Slate: Why COVID Was the Final Straw for Brooks Brothers

Slate: Why COVID Was the Final Straw for Brooks Brothers. “The COVID pandemic and the work-from-home-in-sweatpants culture it’s accelerated tipped Brooks Brothers over a cliff. In June, Brooks announced it would close three of its factories and lay off 700 workers. In July, it filed for bankruptcy. In August, it was sold to a group known for snatching up famous but troubled brand names at bargain prices. For more than a century, Brooks Brothers defined fashion for a certain kind of East Coast American elite. It’s been the clothier to nearly every U.S. president. So how did it get here?”

Harper’s Bazaar: Antoine Gregory’s Black Fashion Fair Creates Space for Long Overlooked Black Designers

Harper’s Bazaar: Antoine Gregory’s Black Fashion Fair Creates Space for Long Overlooked Black Designers. “After years of being one of the only Black people in a room or on a set, Gregory was inspired to create and produce Black Fashion Fair—an immersive online platform where Black fashion designers are championed, celebrated, and centered. Its website serves as an online database where Black designers are listed A-Z, and a virtual marketplace with a stellar curation of fashion’s most exciting Black designers.”

Boston Globe: Will we ever wear real clothes again?

Boston Globe: Will we ever wear real clothes again?. “Obsessing over pandemic fashion is a luxury some don’t have. Many workers have been forced to show up at their jobs since COVID-19 hit even when it didn’t feel safe. Others have lost their jobs. But with major Boston-area employers extending work-from-home policies until 2021 or beyond, and events and concerts and eating inside at restaurants and other fun activities either canceled, postponed, or greatly scaled back, the question has to be asked: Will we ever wear real clothes again?”

CNN: Tie-dye on the rise as a pandemic pastime

CNN: Tie-dye on the rise as a pandemic pastime. “For Danielle Somers, tie-dye has taken on ritual status during the pandemic. Like all good rituals, it’s a mix of order and chaos; the process is deeply familiar while the outcomes remain mysterious. When tie-dying, she takes her time preparing and setting up the different colors, placing the rubber bands on the cloth, dipping the cloth in the ink and then, in time, observing the surprising results.”

Global Times: Chinese museum launches digital protection for nearly 50 Ming Dynasty costume items

Global Times: Chinese museum launches digital protection for nearly 50 Ming Dynasty costume items . “Shan Dong Museum in East China’s Shandong Province launched digital protection for nearly 50 items of ancient costumes of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), filling the gap of digital collection of cultural relics. The museum’s staff will collect textures of costumes from hundreds of years ago and complete the work of modeling these costumes, according to a report by China News Service on Wednesday.”

BBC: Ghanaian Covid-19-inspired fashion wax-print designs launched

BBC: Ghanaian Covid-19-inspired fashion wax-print designs launched. “The new fabrics have symbols like padlocks, keys and planes to reflect some of the measures implemented to curb the spread of coronavirus. Wax prints are popular in Ghana, many office workers wear them on Fridays.” Those of you who read ResearchBuzz know that if I see something I don’t know about, I go looking for background. Slate has an extensive background on wax prints.

Canterbury Museum: Twentieth Century Fashion Goes Online

Canterbury Museum: Twentieth Century Fashion Goes Online. “From fabulous frocks to everyday garments, Invercargill-born Mollie Rodie Mackenzie amassed one of New Zealand’s most comprehensive collections of twentieth century fashion. Almost half of the 2,000 collection items can now be seen online, as a tribute to Mollie who died last month in Queensland aged 100. The collection includes nearly 800 accessories such as hats, shoes, handbags, gloves, necklaces, scarves, belts and neckties that complement the hundreds of dresses, jackets and shirts – women’s, men’s and children’s – that Mollie collected in her lifetime.

Invision Community: New Website Launched Dedicated to Cosplay

Invision Community: New Website Launched Dedicated to Cosplay. “ReedPop has announced the launch of Cosplay Central – a new multiplatform destination that is designed to be the global voice of the cosplay community and the premier destination for all things Cosplay, including the latest news, special features, videos, advice columns, interviews, tutorials, photo galleries and much more.”

Thanks to COVID-19, there’s a new category in retail: the cloth face mask (Marketplace)

Marketplace: Thanks to COVID-19, there’s a new category in retail: the cloth face mask. “Every time I scroll through my Instagram feed now, there’s another ad for another company selling face masks. There are the classic ones in neutral tones. The ones made of organic cotton. The ones with → your company’s logo ← here. Overnight, the face mask has become America’s new T-shirt.”

Coronavirus: The US clothing firms now making gowns and gloves (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: The US clothing firms now making gowns and gloves. “In a normal year Michael Rubin’s athletic apparel factory in Pennsylvania would be ramping up for the start of baseball season, churning out team uniforms and clothing to sell to fans. Instead his company, Fanatics, has remade itself into a gown and mask manufacturer for hospitals facing shortages of protective gear as they fight the coronavirus. Fanatics isn’t alone. Thousands of companies across the US have responded to pleas for help from hospitals facing shortages of critical health supplies.”

Nylon: High Fashion Houses Are Launching Social Media Projects For Fans At Home

Nylon: High Fashion Houses Are Launching Social Media Projects For Fans At Home. “Fashion houses are finding ways to keep the creativity going, even while working from home. Alexander McQueen, Balmain, and Bottega Veneta have all launched new initiatives all meant to thrive while the world is in isolation. On Wednesday, Alexander McQueen announced the McQueen Creators project, inviting fans to offer new interpretations of classic McQueen pieces presented through social media. For the first week, fans are encouraged to sketch, paint, or color the rose dress from its Fall 2019 collection, with some to be featured on Alexander McQueen’s Instagram page.”

Japan Times: Fashion week is compelled to go online

Japan Times: Fashion week is compelled to go online. “The runway shows and their accompanying exhibitions, where buyers’ orders are actually taken, incur astronomical costs. The size of the brand doesn’t matter, they all have to send out invitations via PR agencies, book models and plan after-parties — a significant financial outlay that must be recouped though sales in order to survive. For smaller brands, fashion weeks are already a gamble.”