Global Times: Chinese museum launches digital protection for nearly 50 Ming Dynasty costume items

Global Times: Chinese museum launches digital protection for nearly 50 Ming Dynasty costume items . “Shan Dong Museum in East China’s Shandong Province launched digital protection for nearly 50 items of ancient costumes of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), filling the gap of digital collection of cultural relics. The museum’s staff will collect textures of costumes from hundreds of years ago and complete the work of modeling these costumes, according to a report by China News Service on Wednesday.”

BBC: Ghanaian Covid-19-inspired fashion wax-print designs launched

BBC: Ghanaian Covid-19-inspired fashion wax-print designs launched. “The new fabrics have symbols like padlocks, keys and planes to reflect some of the measures implemented to curb the spread of coronavirus. Wax prints are popular in Ghana, many office workers wear them on Fridays.” Those of you who read ResearchBuzz know that if I see something I don’t know about, I go looking for background. Slate has an extensive background on wax prints.

Canterbury Museum: Twentieth Century Fashion Goes Online

Canterbury Museum: Twentieth Century Fashion Goes Online. “From fabulous frocks to everyday garments, Invercargill-born Mollie Rodie Mackenzie amassed one of New Zealand’s most comprehensive collections of twentieth century fashion. Almost half of the 2,000 collection items can now be seen online, as a tribute to Mollie who died last month in Queensland aged 100. The collection includes nearly 800 accessories such as hats, shoes, handbags, gloves, necklaces, scarves, belts and neckties that complement the hundreds of dresses, jackets and shirts – women’s, men’s and children’s – that Mollie collected in her lifetime.

Invision Community: New Website Launched Dedicated to Cosplay

Invision Community: New Website Launched Dedicated to Cosplay. “ReedPop has announced the launch of Cosplay Central – a new multiplatform destination that is designed to be the global voice of the cosplay community and the premier destination for all things Cosplay, including the latest news, special features, videos, advice columns, interviews, tutorials, photo galleries and much more.”

Thanks to COVID-19, there’s a new category in retail: the cloth face mask (Marketplace)

Marketplace: Thanks to COVID-19, there’s a new category in retail: the cloth face mask. “Every time I scroll through my Instagram feed now, there’s another ad for another company selling face masks. There are the classic ones in neutral tones. The ones made of organic cotton. The ones with → your company’s logo ← here. Overnight, the face mask has become America’s new T-shirt.”

Coronavirus: The US clothing firms now making gowns and gloves (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: The US clothing firms now making gowns and gloves. “In a normal year Michael Rubin’s athletic apparel factory in Pennsylvania would be ramping up for the start of baseball season, churning out team uniforms and clothing to sell to fans. Instead his company, Fanatics, has remade itself into a gown and mask manufacturer for hospitals facing shortages of protective gear as they fight the coronavirus. Fanatics isn’t alone. Thousands of companies across the US have responded to pleas for help from hospitals facing shortages of critical health supplies.”

Nylon: High Fashion Houses Are Launching Social Media Projects For Fans At Home

Nylon: High Fashion Houses Are Launching Social Media Projects For Fans At Home. “Fashion houses are finding ways to keep the creativity going, even while working from home. Alexander McQueen, Balmain, and Bottega Veneta have all launched new initiatives all meant to thrive while the world is in isolation. On Wednesday, Alexander McQueen announced the McQueen Creators project, inviting fans to offer new interpretations of classic McQueen pieces presented through social media. For the first week, fans are encouraged to sketch, paint, or color the rose dress from its Fall 2019 collection, with some to be featured on Alexander McQueen’s Instagram page.”

Japan Times: Fashion week is compelled to go online

Japan Times: Fashion week is compelled to go online. “The runway shows and their accompanying exhibitions, where buyers’ orders are actually taken, incur astronomical costs. The size of the brand doesn’t matter, they all have to send out invitations via PR agencies, book models and plan after-parties — a significant financial outlay that must be recouped though sales in order to survive. For smaller brands, fashion weeks are already a gamble.”

Marie Claire: ‘Working From Home Fits’ Is The Wholesome New Instagram Account You Need To Follow

Marie Claire: ‘Working From Home Fits’ Is The Wholesome New Instagram Account You Need To Follow. “With most of the world in lockdown and self-quarantined to stop the spread of COVID-19, an emerging new fashion trend has come to light. Titled the ‘work from home fit’, social media users globally are sharing what they’re wearing as their daily work uniform – including, but not limited to, dressing up for no reason, mismatched shoes and non-work appropriate tees, luxurious two-piece sets and pyjamas.”

TechCrunch: Glisten uses computer vision to break down product photos to their most important parts

TechCrunch: Glisten uses computer vision to break down product photos to their most important parts. “It’s amazing that in this day and age, the best way to search for new clothes is to click a few check boxes and then scroll through endless pictures. Why can’t you search for ‘green patterned scoop neck dress’ and see one? Glisten is a new startup enabling just that by using computer vision to understand and list the most important aspects of the products in any photo.”

Inside The “Vault”: Emily Adams Bode Partners With Microsoft on an AI-Powered Digital Quilt Archive (Vogue)

Vogue: Inside The “Vault”: Emily Adams Bode Partners With Microsoft on an AI-Powered Digital Quilt Archive. “The custom AI-powered, design-to-production platform acts as a computerized library of quilts and patterns through which Bode and her team can attach historical dates and facts and catalogue how much of a certain material they have left…. This is the first technology of its kind to be applied to fashion in this way, and the hope is that more and more brands, namely those which use upcycled or historical materials, will be able to utilize the platform in order to help streamline and grow their businesses.”

Mashable: Instagram is changing how people pack for trips

Mashable: Instagram is changing how people pack for trips. “When Alyssa Ramos packs for a trip, functionality is far from her top priority. This solo traveler researches which colors will pop in her next destination, and brainstorms how outfits will fare with her Instagram audience. Sure, it sounds extra, but packing for Instagram is part of Ramos’ job. As a full-time travel influencer, she gets paid to take gorgeous photos in drool-worthy destinations, and she makes money through partnerships with fashion brands. But influencers aren’t the only ones matching outfits to locations these days.”

ELLE: Fashion Responds To Climate Change With Digitized Versions Of Nature

ELLE: Fashion Responds To Climate Change With Digitized Versions Of Nature. “Florals for spring are not, as has been established, groundbreaking. But Huji-filtered superblooms on a dress? That’s far less expected. The term uncanny valley was coined by robotics scientist Masahiro Mori to describe the revulsion humans feel toward robots as they come to appear more and more lifelike. (Think of our collective fascination—and discomfort—with ‘realistic’ simulations like the CGI model/influencer Lil Miquela.) This wariness has tended to apply more to representations of humans than of nature, but as pristine wilderness becomes rarer and more threatened, these heightened representations of it feel more uncanny.”