ZDNet: What’s the best cloud storage for you?

ZDNet: What’s the best cloud storage for you? . “In 2007, Drew Houston, Dropbox’s CEO, got sick and tired of misplacing his USB drive, so he created the first personal and small business cloud storage service. It was a radical one in its day. Today, everyone and their uncle seems to be offering cheap or free cloud storage. That’s great! Except, well, how do you choose which one is right for you? It used to be that most people decided simply on the basis of how much free storage space they got. That’s simple, but it only tells part of the story.”

New York Times: It’s Almost 2019. Do You Know Where Your Photos Are?

New York Times: It’s Almost 2019. Do You Know Where Your Photos Are?. “Do you know where your photos are? Most of us don’t, at least not exactly, or in terms that we fully understand. Holding on to pictures was, for most of the history of photography, a matter of material decay and physical storage. Are these prints fading, and how fast? Are they organized by year or by subject? Do I know where they are? To the people who took them, they were deeply valuable; to anyone else, mostly worthless. Their peculiar sort of pricelessness made archivists of regular people.”

Lifehacker: How to Move Your Photos From Flickr to Another Service

Lifehacker: How to Move Your Photos From Flickr to Another Service . “If you don’t want to pay $50 each year for Flickr Pro—which frees you of these limitations and throws in other fun features like ad-free browsing, video uploads of up to 10 minute each, and a bevy of stats—you’re probably going to want to prune your account manually. (That, or maybe it’s time to move all your photos to another service.)”

BetaNews: Dropbox Extensions let you edit your cloud-based files online

BetaNews: Dropbox Extensions let you edit your cloud-based files online. “Dropbox has just announced a new feature that makes it possible to edit your files online without the need to download them first. Dropbox Extensions give you the ability to edit a number of file types without the need to ever navigate away from Dropbox.”

CogDogBlog: I have blogged not to bury flickr nor to praise it…

CogDogBlog: I have blogged not to bury flickr nor to praise it…. “I cannot imagine any way for the new owners of flickr to surmount Yahoo’s [inexplicable insane colossally stupid] [Note: the words in brackets were “crossed-out” in CogDog’s original article; that option is not available in ASCII — TJC] idea to offer unlimited image hosting to all free accounts. But if flickr wants to not alienate their community, why are they doing it right off the bat? No one who has the photos deleted is going to say nice things about the company. I guess their dice roll is to not worry about the ingrates who were not paying. Or that anyone will be satisfied by the new 1000 photo limit knowing it used to be 200.”

Flickr Blog: Why we’re changing Flickr free accounts

Flickr Blog: Why we’re changing Flickr free accounts. “Beginning January 8, 2019, Free accounts will be limited to 1,000 photos and videos. If you need unlimited storage, you’ll need to upgrade to Flickr Pro. In 2013, Yahoo lost sight of what makes Flickr truly special and responded to a changing landscape in online photo sharing by giving every Flickr user a staggering terabyte of free storage. This, and numerous related changes to the Flickr product during that time, had strongly negative consequences.”

TechCrunch: Buggy software in popular connected storage drives can let hackers read private data

TechCrunch: Buggy software in popular connected storage drives can let hackers read private data . “Security researchers have found flaws in four popular connected storage drives that they say could let hackers access a user’s private and sensitive data. The researchers Paulos Yibelo and Daniel Eshetu said the software running on three of the devices they tested — NetGear Stora, Seagate Home and Medion LifeCloud — can allow an attacker to remotely read, change and delete data without requiring a password.”