Port of Los Angeles: New Website Provides Close-Up Look At Port Of Los Angeles Marine Habitats, Wildlife

Port of Los Angeles: New Website Provides Close-Up Look At Port Of Los Angeles Marine Habitats, Wildlife. “As part of ongoing efforts to promote a deeper understanding of the diverse habitats of Los Angeles Harbor, the Port of Los Angeles has unveiled an educational website showcasing the abundant marine life thriving above and below Port waterways…. The LA Harbor Habitats site creates a visual and three-dimensional representation of marine life at the Port, providing users with various ways to explore the trade gateway’s biology, including by habitat—from the shore to seafloor. Underwater videos, interactive games and stunning photography of the undersea world of the Port add to the experience.”

Now Available: The Full Salvaging Solutions to Abandoned and Derelict Vessels Webinar Series (NOAA Marine Debris Program)

NOAA Marine Debris Program: Now Available: The Full Salvaging Solutions to Abandoned and Derelict Vessels Webinar Series. “Thousands of abandoned and derelict vessels (ADVs) litter coastal waterways all over the country, obstructing navigational channels, causing harm to the environment, and diminishing commercial and recreational activities. For many communities, assessing, removing, and disposing of these vessels is complex and requires significant financial resources. Over the past year, experts from across the country shared their experiences, solutions, and lessons learned through our Salvaging Solutions to Abandoned and Derelict Vessels monthly webinar series to help communities facing ADV issues. We are pleased to share that the full webinar series is now available on our website.”

‘Segregated Sands’: Delaware Beaches During Jim Crow (Delaware News)

Delaware News: ‘Segregated Sands’: Delaware Beaches During Jim Crow. “The Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs’ Zwaanendael Museum in Lewes, Delaware has recently published ‘Segregated Sands: Delaware’s Segregated Beaches During the Jim Crow Era,’ an online exhibit that explores the history and stories of the Indigenous and African American experience at Delaware’s beaches during the segregation era.”

Hakai Magazine: China’s Surprisingly Robust System of Marine Protection

Hakai Magazine: China’s Surprisingly Robust System of Marine Protection. “China, as the world’s largest producer and consumer of seafood, is well known for its voracious international fishing fleet. But a comprehensive understanding of the country’s efforts on marine protection, at least in its domestic waters, has remained elusive—even to many experts within China. Now, an international group of researchers has compiled the first database of marine conservation efforts in the country, and it is more extensive than many expected.”

AXA XL: AXA XL launches new Coastal Risk Index

AXA XL: AXA XL launches new Coastal Risk Index. “The CRI has been developed in partnership with AXA’s scientific partners, IHE Delft (Netherlands) and University of California, Santa Cruz (USA) and the Government of Canada through the Ocean Risk and Resilience Action Alliance (ORRAA). It assesses coastal flooding in the context of climate change by comparing scenarios with and without coastal ecosystems, such as coral reefs and mangroves, helping to build the case for nature-based solutions.”

NASA: Track Sea-level Changes Anywhere with NASA’s New SEA Tool

NASA: Track Sea-level Changes Anywhere with NASA’s New SEA Tool. “NASA’s newly updated online tool, SEA (Sea-level Evaluation and Assessment), provides a snapshot of the ocean’s rise or fall for locations across the planet. It covers the period between 1993 and 2019. In most places, you’ll find sea levels rising; globally averaged sea level has increased significantly over decades. But quirks of ocean currents, rising or falling coastlines, and even gravity itself mean sea-level change is not uniform across the planet.”

NOAA Research News: NOAA’s National Marine Ecosystem Status website provides one-stop shop for key marine ecosystem data

NOAA Research News: NOAA’s National Marine Ecosystem Status website provides one-stop shop for key marine ecosystem data. “Today, NOAA is announcing a re-launch of its National Marine Ecosystem Status website, a tool that provides easy access to NOAA’s wide range of important coastal and marine ecosystem data. The website provides a starting point for educators, outreach specialists, and the interested public to explore the status of seven major U.S. marine ecosystems and the nation. The re-launch of the site features updated indicator data, new regional coverage for some existing indicators, and a completely new Marine Species Distribution Indicator.”

State Archives of North Carolina: Aycock Brown Photographs Digital Collection

State Archives of North Carolina: Aycock Brown Photographs Digital Collection. “Charles Brantley ‘Aycock’ Brown was a journalist and photographer who moved to Ocracoke in the 1920s. He is largely credited with helping advance tourism in the Outer Banks. Aycock Brown documented the development of the Outer Banks from the 1920s into the 1960s. He would often take pictures of major events, people on the street, development projects, and anything he found interesting.”

WWLP: New tool maps birds, fish in offshore wind areas

WWLP: New tool maps birds, fish in offshore wind areas. “While federal and state officials eagerly pursue a rapid and significant deployment of offshore wind turbines to generate cleaner power along the East Coast, scientists and advocates on Wednesday unveiled a new mapping tool designed to give developers, regulators and the public a better sense of the natural resources below the surface in the neighborhood of proposed wind projects.”

UC Santa Barbara: Sharing Seaweed

UC Santa Barbara: Sharing Seaweed. “UC Santa Barbara hosts a large and historic seaweed collection archived for long-term preservation. Unfortunately, this wealth is largely hidden from public view. Scientists at the university’s Vernon and Mary Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration (CCBER) were determined to make this valuable data freely available through a recently funded digitization program.”

Firstpost: Online exhibition archives oral histories of the Kolis, degradation of Mumbai’s coastal ecology

Firstpost: Online exhibition archives oral histories of the Kolis, degradation of Mumbai’s coastal ecology. “Through generations, the Kolis have observed firsthand how the ecology has been disturbed, and given how closely intertwined their lives are with nature, have had to adapt to these changes. All this is evident in their photos, displayed at the online exhibition Through the Eyes of the Kolis: A Reflection of Mumbai’s Past, Present, and Future, created by the experimental think tank Bombay61 Studio, with The Heritage Lab and Ministry of Mumbai’s Magic (MMM).”

DTU Aqua: Photo posts reveal huge interest for real coastal nature

DTU Aqua: Photo posts reveal huge interest for real coastal nature. “Tourists are generating more social media attention about marine protected areas than about other neighbouring coastal areas. In those protected areas they focus more on nature as such, wildlife or wild landscapes, whereas photos from nearby, ‘control’, coastal zones are more focused on human infrastructure like roads, trains, restaurants as well as cultural and historical sites….The photographers also described their photos taken in marine protected areas in a more positive manner than those taken outside MPAs. The social media followers viewing photos of those experiences liked and commented more on MPA photos than they did for non-MPA photos.”

University of Central Florida: UCF Researchers Create Global Storm Surge Database

University of Central Florida: UCF Researchers Create Global Storm Surge Database. “The researchers also visualized the data by creating an online map that displays 802 tide gauges from around the world and all relevant data corresponding to each tide gauge covering the entire 1900s and most of the 1800s. Users can click on the tide gauge and download multiple daily maximum surge datasets.”

US Department of Defense: DOD Announces Release of the DOD Regional Sea Level Database

US Department of Defense: DOD Announces Release of the DOD Regional Sea Level Database. “Public access to the database allows for the integration of future sea level change information by contracted third parties such as engineering firms in their efforts to provide installation and facilities planning and design services for coastal locations. The database and its accompanying report, Regional Sea Level Scenarios for Coastal Risk Management, were developed by the DOD-led Coastal Assessment Regional Scenario Working Group to provide a consistent, authoritative approach to account for changing sea levels at DOD sites worldwide.”