East Idaho News: Meet the woman behind the largest online missing persons cold case database

East Idaho News: Meet the woman behind the largest online missing persons cold case database. “Meaghan Good is the woman behind the largest missing persons cold case database on the internet.In 2004, she founded the Charley Project a week after her nineteenth birthday. There are currently 14,000 ‘cold case’ missing people on the website – most from the United States. The site relies on donations and the teacher salary of Good’s husband.”

Philly Voice: Philly Police launch unsolved murders website, hope public can help find suspects

Philly Voice: Philly Police launch unsolved murders website, hope public can help find suspects. “The site, called Philly Unsolved Murders, includes a database of unsolved murder cases featuring photos and stories or descriptions about victims. The stories and photos are submitted by the victims’ families, police said.” The site is not complete; more cases will be added over time.

ABC News: Teens tweet Trump, find Senate ally, score civil rights win

ABC News: Teens tweet Trump, find Senate ally, score civil rights win. “All the bill needed to become law was President Donald Trump’s signature. It would create a national archive of documents from civil rights cold cases. Students had been working on the project for years, families waiting on it for decades. But time was running out. Legislation dies in the transition from one session of Congress to the next, and unless Trump acted, it would be lost. So the students at New Jersey’s Hightstown High School did what teenagers do: They started tweeting at the president.”

Salt Lake Tribune: Utah leaders hope a new database will help them solve the more than 400 cold cases in the state

Salt Lake Tribune: Utah leaders hope a new database will help them solve the more than 400 cold cases in the state. “There are more than 400 cold cases throughout Utah — unsolved homicides, reports of missing persons or unidentified bodies. Last year, lawmakers passed a bill that requires all law-enforcement agencies to share information on unsolved missing persons and homicide cases that are more than 3 years old. The goal is to help police share information and make connections between cases that are being investigated by different agencies.” Part of the database will be available to the public.

University of North Texas: A better cold-case database

University of North Texas: A better cold-case database. “NamUs, or the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, is a clearinghouse and resource center for missing person cases, unidentified bodies, unidentified living individuals and unclaimed bodies. Based at UNT Health Science Center since 2011, it is managed by the UNT Center for Human Identification through a cooperative agreement with the National Institute of Justice. NamUs 2.0 replaces the existing NamUs databases, which were launched in 2007 and 2008. Since then, NamUs has received more than 15,000 unidentified person cases and over 32,000 missing person cases. More than 3,000 of those unidentified person cases and more than 14,000 missing person cases have been resolved.”

Northeastern University: Bringing justice, and closure, in civil rights cold cases

In development: an online archive devoted to civil rights “cold cases”. “Federal authorities have noted that investigating his­toric cold cases is extremely dif­fi­cult due to fac­tors such as sub­jects or wit­nesses dying, lost evi­dence, or orig­inal inves­ti­ga­tions lacking the tech­nical or sci­en­tific advances to be relied upon today…. [Northeastern University Law Professor Margaret] Burnham is now leading an effort to create an archive of his­tor­ical records, legal doc­u­ments, video and audio record­ings, photos, and other mate­rials. Burnham is working with dig­ital human­i­ties scholars at North­eastern to build the archive, which is intended to pre­serve the his­tory of these cases and pro­vide scholars with a robust resource of infor­ma­tion on racial vio­lence.”