Loyola Marymount University: Snapchat, Instagram Linked to Alcohol Abuse Among College Students

Loyola Marymount University: Snapchat, Instagram Linked to Alcohol Abuse Among College Students. “Exposure to alcohol-related content on social media is associated with increased drinking among college students, according to several new studies from researchers at Loyola Marymount University. The effect stems from perceptions of drinking norms — the idea that everyone else is drinking, or drinking a lot, which in turn drives how much or how often college students really do consume alcohol, said Joe LaBrie, LMU psychology professor and lead author of the studies.”

Maryland Today: UMD Libraries, Others Awarded $750K to Archive Social Justice Activism by College Students of Color

Maryland Today: UMD Libraries, Others Awarded $750K to Archive Social Justice Activism by College Students of Color. “The University of Maryland Libraries, the Atlanta University Center Robert Woodruff Library and the nationwide consortium Project STAND have received a $750,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to expand a free digital archive of documents and artifacts chronicling activism among college students of color. The multi-institutional collection includes oral histories, recordings of student radio, film and digital photography, posters, newspapers and other documentation of diverse movements and groups, stretching from the present as far back as student abolitionist activity during African American enslavement.”

Washington Post: A mental health crisis was unraveling on college campuses. The pandemic has made it worse.

Washington Post: A mental health crisis was unraveling on college campuses. The pandemic has made it worse.. “Across the country, some school leaders and experts say the pandemic has brought new urgency to a mental health crisis that had been unraveling on college campuses for years. From social isolation to heightened feelings of inadequacy, students say it has made it harder to concentrate on school and put a strain on families and friendships.”

New York Times: Colleges That Require Virus-Screening Tech Struggle to Say Whether It Works

New York Times: Colleges That Require Virus-Screening Tech Struggle to Say Whether It Works. “The University of Idaho is one of hundreds of colleges and universities that adopted fever scanners, symptom checkers, wearable heart-rate monitors and other new Covid-screening technologies this school year. Such tools often cost less than a more validated health intervention: frequent virus testing of all students. They also help colleges showcase their pandemic safety efforts. But the struggle at many colleges to keep the virus at bay has raised questions about the usefulness of the technologies.”

Carnegie Mellon University: COVID-related Depression Linked to Reduced Physical Activity

Carnegie Mellon University: COVID-related Depression Linked to Reduced Physical Activity. “New research from Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Pittsburgh and the University of California San Diego found that 61% of surveyed university students were at risk of clinical depression, twice the rate prior to the pandemic. This rise in depression came alongside dramatic shifts in lifestyle habits. The study documents dramatic changes in physical activity, sleep and time use at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Disruptions to physical activity emerged as a leading risk factor for depression. Importantly, those who maintained their exercise habits were at significantly lower risk than those who experienced the large declines in physical activity.”

CNBC: Google’s program for Black college students suffered disorganization and culture clashes, former participants say

CNBC: Google’s program for Black college students suffered disorganization and culture clashes, former participants say. “In 2017, Lauren Clayton joined the inaugural class of Howard West, Google’s on-campus immersion program for Black college students. She became a star scholar whose big smile would grace marketing materials and news coverage. As the only Black woman in that inaugural class to score a coveted internship offer from Google, she now says the program’s leaders didn’t deliver on the promises that inspired her to accept the offer in the first place.”

‘They have the skills and are ready to go’: College health care students step up to help massive COVID-19 vaccine effort. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: ‘They have the skills and are ready to go’: College health care students step up to help massive COVID-19 vaccine effort.. “Jamie Reit has spent months on the front lines of the fight against COVID-19. The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee senior has always liked to keep busy, juggling rigorous science classes, playing on the university’s basketball team and working as a nanny. This semester, with her basketball eligibility over, she couldn’t help but feel it was her responsibility to help her community fight the COVID-19 pandemic and to take the chance to hone her medical skills. Reit started looking for contact tracing jobs, and in October ended up working as a COVID-19 tester at Miller Park.”

Arizona State University: Research examines how students react to moral messages about COVID-19

Arizona State University: Research examines how students react to moral messages about COVID-19. “According to data collected by a team of Arizona State University researchers, students struggle to balance the safety of vulnerable family members with the need for peer connection. Led by Professor Vince Waldron of the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences and the Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics, the team interviewed on- and off-campus university students as they began the fall 2020 semester to discern what moral messages informed their decision-making during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Washington Post: College students hit the road after an eerie pandemic semester. Will the virus go home with them?

Washington Post: College students hit the road after an eerie pandemic semester. Will the virus go home with them?. “They have endured the strangest fall term in memory, cooped up in dormitories and apartments, taking classes mostly online, seeing professors in person only occasionally, if at all, hanging out with just a few close friends and imagining how this lakeshore capital in a state swamped by the coronavirus might someday recover its boisterous college vibe when the pandemic subsides. Now thousands of University of Wisconsin students are making getaway plans, part of a mass pre-Thanksgiving exodus from campuses nationwide that could spread the dangerous pathogen in hometowns across the country if students and schools aren’t careful.”

The Auburn Plainsman: Some students retreat from social media

The Auburn Plainsman: Some students retreat from social media. “On social media platforms across the board, likes, shares and comments make people feel happy. Some believe the danger comes when one gets hooked to the hit of neurotransmitters. Suddenly, no like, comment or share can satisfy the craving. In the end, people can find themselves coming back, even if they no longer particularly enjoy it.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: What Does a College Student Look Like? Stock Images From the Quad Are Getting an Update.

Chronicle of Higher Education: What Does a College Student Look Like? Stock Images From the Quad Are Getting an Update.. “For decades, a disproportionate number of stock images have portrayed the experience of one kind of student: the 18- to 22-year-old attending a residential four-year college. But all those fresh-faced kids on tree-shaded quads are, in fact, the minority. (Did you know that only about 15 percent of undergraduates live in campus dorms?) Now, more than ever, some higher-education experts say, the world needs to see more images of students who fit a different description.”

College students upended by the pandemic wrestle with yet another challenge: How to vote this fall? (Washington Post)

Washington Post: College students upended by the pandemic wrestle with yet another challenge: How to vote this fall?. “When students at the University of Texas at Austin were sent home this spring as the coronavirus pandemic shut down college campuses, Janae Steggall and other campus organizers scrambled to help students make sure they could still vote in the primaries. But despite blasting out social media graphics, hotline numbers and digital care packages to help students figure out where they were eligible to vote, some students never got their ballots after they returned home — including Steggall, who leads a civic engagement group on campus.”