Remezcla: This Photo Archive Holds the Untold History of Colombia’s Trans Community

Remezcla: This Photo Archive Holds the Untold History of Colombia’s Trans Community. “Each photograph is a gateway to many stories. That’s what the Bogotá-born artist Manuel Parra, known as Manu Mojito, learned early on as he met the trans ‘mothers’ of Colombia’s capital. These women shared with him vintage photographs from their family albums — of parties, beauty pageants, pride parades and of complex lives that had gone unnoticed by most of society. Then, almost eight years ago, Parra conceived the idea of Colombia Trans History. He imagined an archive of images, taken from the photo albums of trans women, that could weave together an alternative telling of trans women’s history in relation to what had been narrated by the predominant media of the times, which usually framed trans women as criminals.”

What’s Up with WhatsApp: The Widespread Use of WhatsApp in Political Campaigning in the Global South (Tactical Tech)

Tactical Tech: What’s Up with WhatsApp: The Widespread Use of WhatsApp in Political Campaigning in the Global South. “The past few years have seen WhatsApp become an increasingly powerful and influential tool for political campaigns in the Global South. For many people in the Global North, it may come as a surprise that participation in large WhatsApp groups constitutes the majority of online communication for many users in South America, Africa and Southeast Asia. While WhatsApp helps politicians reach voters and constituents in areas that don’t otherwise have access to the internet, it also extends the reach and primacy of Facebook (who own the platform) in the democratic process in these countries. This article reveals some of the many ways WhatsApp is being deployed as a major part of the political process in countries including Brazil, Colombia, Kenya and Malaysia.”

Nieman Lab: La Pulla’s wildly popular YouTube videos (born at a 130-year-old newspaper) are bringing hard news to young Colombians

Nieman Lab: La Pulla’s wildly popular YouTube videos (born at a 130-year-old newspaper) are bringing hard news to young Colombians. “María Paulina Baena gets stopped on the streets of Bogota, Colombia. Young people ask to take selfies with her and tell her how much they love La Pulla. The 27-year-old is the public face of the satirical video column that has shaken up the way young people consume news in Colombia. Created two years ago by five young journalists from the country’s oldest newspaper, the 130-year-old El Espectador, La Pulla has succeeded at what publishers worldwide long to do — connect with millennial audiences.”

The Next Web: Shop owner’s takedown of Google leads to new consumer protection law in Colombia

The Next Web: Shop owner’s takedown of Google leads to new consumer protection law in Colombia. “A Colombian shop owner fought for his rights against Google. The small-scale furniture seller recently won a court battle with Google after failing to silence an anonymous blogger who spread false accusations, shattering his online reputation.”

Gabriel García Márquez Archive to Be Digitized

The University of Texas at Austin’s Harry Ransom Center has received a grant to digitize the Gabriel García Márquez archive. “Sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the award will take effect June 2016 in the form of an 18-month project. During this time, manuscripts, notebooks, scrapbooks, photographs, and other relics from the Colombian writer’s archive, which dates from 1950 through 2013, will be scanned and published online.”

New Privacy-Focused Search Engine is From Colombia

There’s a new privacy-focused search engine in town — and it’s from Colombia (PRESS RELEASE). “Colombia’s young search engine Gyffu is moving from strength to strength. Now available in English as well as Spanish, the privacy focused search engine recently crossed the important mark of being one of the world’s top one million websites, along with breaking into Colombia’s top 10,000. This trend is expected to continue as interest in online privacy continues to build.”