Washington Post: This map helped George Washington win the Revolutionary War. Now it’s on display at Mount Vernon.

The Washington Post: This map helped George Washington win the Revolutionary War. Now it’s on display at Mount Vernon.. “In the summer of 1781, Gen. George Washington and his French engineers probed the British defenses of New York, looking for a way to attack. While the British responded with heavy gunfire, Washington observed, and the engineers prepared a map of the enemy positions… Now the historic French map, along with more than 1,000 other rare maps and images, have been donated to the Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon by a noted New York collector….It will eventually be available to scholars, in person, and later some of the items will go on public display, library officials said. Most of the pieces have already been digitized and are online.”

The Harvard Crimson: Harvard Digitizes Colonial North America Archives

The Harvard Crimson: Harvard Digitizes Colonial North America Archives. “A decade-long project to digitize every 17th- and 18th- century manuscript and archive in Harvard’s collections relating to North America will be finished this semester, according to University Archivist Megan Sniffin-Marinoff. The project, called Colonial North America at Harvard Library, will make more than 600,000 photographs of the documents publicly available online for the first time.”

Hartford Courant: A new project reveals the hidden history of colonial people of color who are buried in downtown Hartford

Hartford Courant: A new project reveals the hidden history of colonial people of color who are buried in downtown Hartford. “The graves of hundreds of African Americans and Native Americans lie in downtown Hartford’s Ancient Burying Ground, but without headstones they remain invisible. Excluded from official records or referred to only by race, their stories remain as hidden as their graves. Four centuries after enslaved people were first brought to America, a new project organized by the Ancient Burying Ground Association investigates hundreds of these untold stories. ‘Uncovering Their History’ shares the stories of colonists of color: an enslaved couple given away as a wedding present, black men who joined the Continental Navy in hopes of obtaining their freedom, Native American doctors and servants.”

Revisiting the Disputed Federalist Papers: Historical Forensics with the Chaos Game Representation and AI (Wolfram Blog)

Wolfram Blog: Revisiting the Disputed Federalist Papers: Historical Forensics with the Chaos Game Representation and AI. “In 1944 Douglass Adair published ‘The Authorship of the Disputed Federalist Papers,’ wherein he proposed that [James] Madison had been the author of all 12. It was not until 1963, however, that a statistical analysis was performed. In ‘Inference in an Authorship Problem,’ Frederick Mosteller and David Wallace concurred that Madison had indeed been the author of all of them. An excellent account of their work, written much later, is Mosteller’s ‘Who Wrote the Disputed Federalist Papers, Hamilton or Madison?.’ His work on this had its beginnings also in the 1940s, but it was not until the era of ‘modern’ computers that the statistical computations needed could realistically be carried out.”

South Carolina Department of Archives and History: SCDAH Announces Digitization Of Over 11,000 Revolutionary War Records

South Carolina Department of Archives and History: SCDAH Announces Digitization Of Over 11,000 Revolutionary War Records. “The South Carolina Department of Archives and History (SCDAH) is pleased to announce that the records series “Accounts Audited of Claims Growing out of the Revolution in South Carolina 1775-1856” is now active and images are available on the Online Records Index. This record consists of 11,170 documents presented by citizens to the treasury in support of claims for military service, supplies, and other contributions rendered during the latter part of the Revolutionary War. Most of the files contain an auditor’s cover paper, which includes the name of claimant, a brief description of their service provided, and the amount of their claim and its adjusted value. Additionally, if an indent was issued, its number and the claimant’s signature verifying its receipt were also included as well as receipts and affidavits to the validity of the claim.”

USA Today: Was one of your ancestors on the Mayflower? You can find out now

USA Today: Was one of your ancestors on the Mayflower? You can find out now. “Are you related to one of America’s first immigrants? A new “Pilgrim database” from the New England Historic Genealogical Society and the General Society of Mayflower Descendants will let you know for sure.”

Unveiling of La Florida: The Interactive Digital Archive of the Americas to Revolutionize Early American History (University of South Florida)

University of South Florida: Unveiling of La Florida: The Interactive Digital Archive of the Americas to Revolutionize Early American History. “Through short videos, interactive maps and digital reconstructions, La Florida brings to life the diverse melting pot of people that made up early Spanish Florida, from Spanish conquistadors and Native Americans to free and enslaved blacks and Europeans from Germany, Ireland and Eastern Europe. It weaves together in fascinating detail the lives and critical events of America’s earliest beginnings – such as the founding of the first permanent European settlement in the continental U.S. at St. Augustine in 1565; the original St. Patrick’s day celebration that was discovered through this project to have taken place in Florida in 1601; and the first free black settlement anywhere in the colonies at Fort Mose in 1738.”