Revisiting the Disputed Federalist Papers: Historical Forensics with the Chaos Game Representation and AI (Wolfram Blog)

Wolfram Blog: Revisiting the Disputed Federalist Papers: Historical Forensics with the Chaos Game Representation and AI. “In 1944 Douglass Adair published ‘The Authorship of the Disputed Federalist Papers,’ wherein he proposed that [James] Madison had been the author of all 12. It was not until 1963, however, that a statistical analysis was performed. In ‘Inference in an Authorship Problem,’ Frederick Mosteller and David Wallace concurred that Madison had indeed been the author of all of them. An excellent account of their work, written much later, is Mosteller’s ‘Who Wrote the Disputed Federalist Papers, Hamilton or Madison?.’ His work on this had its beginnings also in the 1940s, but it was not until the era of ‘modern’ computers that the statistical computations needed could realistically be carried out.”

South Carolina Department of Archives and History: SCDAH Announces Digitization Of Over 11,000 Revolutionary War Records

South Carolina Department of Archives and History: SCDAH Announces Digitization Of Over 11,000 Revolutionary War Records. “The South Carolina Department of Archives and History (SCDAH) is pleased to announce that the records series “Accounts Audited of Claims Growing out of the Revolution in South Carolina 1775-1856” is now active and images are available on the Online Records Index. This record consists of 11,170 documents presented by citizens to the treasury in support of claims for military service, supplies, and other contributions rendered during the latter part of the Revolutionary War. Most of the files contain an auditor’s cover paper, which includes the name of claimant, a brief description of their service provided, and the amount of their claim and its adjusted value. Additionally, if an indent was issued, its number and the claimant’s signature verifying its receipt were also included as well as receipts and affidavits to the validity of the claim.”

USA Today: Was one of your ancestors on the Mayflower? You can find out now

USA Today: Was one of your ancestors on the Mayflower? You can find out now. “Are you related to one of America’s first immigrants? A new “Pilgrim database” from the New England Historic Genealogical Society and the General Society of Mayflower Descendants will let you know for sure.”

Unveiling of La Florida: The Interactive Digital Archive of the Americas to Revolutionize Early American History (University of South Florida)

University of South Florida: Unveiling of La Florida: The Interactive Digital Archive of the Americas to Revolutionize Early American History. “Through short videos, interactive maps and digital reconstructions, La Florida brings to life the diverse melting pot of people that made up early Spanish Florida, from Spanish conquistadors and Native Americans to free and enslaved blacks and Europeans from Germany, Ireland and Eastern Europe. It weaves together in fascinating detail the lives and critical events of America’s earliest beginnings – such as the founding of the first permanent European settlement in the continental U.S. at St. Augustine in 1565; the original St. Patrick’s day celebration that was discovered through this project to have taken place in Florida in 1601; and the first free black settlement anywhere in the colonies at Fort Mose in 1738.”

New Online: High-Resolution Color Images of James Madison’s Notes from the Constitutional Convention (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: New Online: High-Resolution Color Images of James Madison’s Notes from the Constitutional Convention. “When the Constitutional Convention met in Philadelphia in 1787, James Madison, then a delegate from Virginia, later fourth president of the United States, took it upon himself to take notes…. Those notes—more than 600 pages in Madison’s tiny, neat handwriting—are in the James Madison Papers in the Manuscript Division at the Library of Congress. The Library has long made them available to scholars and the public, first on microfilm, and then online. Now, for the first time, the Library is making available online high-resolution color images of the notes that reflect modern standards for publication.”

Delaware: New Web Portal, Special Programming Commemorate 250th Anniversary of John Dickinson’s Revolutionary “Letters”

State of Delaware: New Web Portal, Special Programming Commemorate 250th Anniversary of John Dickinson’s Revolutionary “Letters”. “n the autumn of 1767, the American Colonies were reeling from a fresh round of taxation without representation handed down by Parliament in London. With their pleas for fair treatment and equal standing ignored by the Crown, the leading men of the fledgling colonial opposition began to turn their thoughts to more direct acts of resistance. But before the Boston Tea Party, before the First Continental Congress, and well before July 4, 1776, the Colonies needed a message to bring them together – a clear text that would lay out their common cause and draw them even closer in unity.”

Harvard: Scroll through Colonial life

Harvard: Scroll through Colonial life. “n a few weeks, the Harvard Library will release a new website for its ongoing, multiyear digitization ‘Colonial North American Project at Harvard University.’ Approximately 450,000 digitized pages of all the known archival and manuscript materials in the Library relating to 17th- and 18th-century North America will be available to the public.”