State of the Planet, Columbia University: New Website Maps and Models the Science of Peace

State of the Planet, Columbia University: New Website Maps and Models the Science of Peace. “A new website … centering on recent research on sustainably peaceful societies has just been launched at The Earth Institute at Columbia University. The website presents an interactive introduction to the findings and outputs of the work of a multidisciplinary team of scholars that began studying peaceful societies in 2014. It showcases a global map of peaceful societies, findings from hundreds of empirical studies, and peace tech visualizations and simulations from the Sustaining Peace Project at the Advanced Consortium on Cooperation, Conflict and Complexity (AC4), which seeks to advocate for more a more comprehensive understanding of how peace is sustained with local stakeholders, policymakers, and academics.”

Just Launched: U.S. Women’s and Girls’ Magazines Web Archive (Columbia University)

Columbia University: Just Launched: U.S. Women’s and Girls’ Magazines Web Archive. “Developed by librarians within the Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation, the archive consists of websites of women’s media that previously existed as print magazines and have long documented women’s thoughts, activities, economic power, sexuality, political interests, social, cultural, and domestic life.”

Just Launched: Vaccination in Modern America: Misinformation vs. Public Health Advocacy Web Archive (Columbia University Libraries)

Columbia University Libraries: Just Launched: Vaccination in Modern America: Misinformation vs. Public Health Advocacy Web Archive. “Developed by librarians within the Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation, the archive preserves webpages representing the current state of public discourse and contrasting approaches to authority on vaccination in the United States, with a focus on sites that are both pro- and anti-vaccination. The purpose of this collection is to capture potentially ephemeral information about vaccination that could be used by health service researchers, information scientists, sociologists, and others to understand the motivations, practices, and outcomes of health information and information on the web.”

Just Launched: Literary Authors from Europe and Eurasia Web Archive (Columbia University Libraries)

Colubmia University Libraries: Just Launched: Literary Authors from Europe and Eurasia Web Archive. “I am pleased to announce the launch of the Literary Authors from Europe and Eurasia Web Archive, comprised of captured website content related to literary authors (of both fiction and non-fiction essays), translators, critics, and publishers from Europe and Eurasia.”

Just Launched: #MeToo and the Women’s Rights Movement in China Web Archive (Columbia University Libraries)

Columbia University Libraries: Just Launched: #MeToo and the Women’s Rights Movement in China Web Archive. “I am pleased to announce the launch of the #MeToo and the Women’s Rights Movement in China Web Archive, comprised of captured website content from women’s organizations and individuals in mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan. Curated by Chengzhi Wang, Chinese Studies Librarian at Columbia University, and Xiao-He Ma, Librarian for the Chinese Collection at Harvard University, the archive aims to systematically archive and preserve web content related to the #MeToo movement and women’s rights activities in the Greater China Region, so that scholars and students will be able to continuously be able to access these important, and potentially ephemeral, materials.”

Just Launched: Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union Web Archive (Columbia University Libraries)

Columbia University Libraries: Just Launched: Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union Web Archive. “I am pleased to announce the launch of the Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union Web Archive, comprised of captured website content from Eastern Europe and the territories of the Former Soviet Union. In recent years, this area of the world has produced a significant volume of websites likely to be of value to contemporary and future humanities, social science, and history projects, and the archive has been established as an attempt to identify, capture, and preserve this material.”

Columbia University: New Online Portal to Teach Free Speech Is Launched

Columbia University: New Online Portal to Teach Free Speech Is Launched. “Columbia Global Freedom of Expression has launched a new teaching portal Freedom of Expression Without Frontiers, in partnership with 10 universities and civil society organizations from around the world, to promote the adoption of a global approach to the teaching of free speech.”

Columbia University: Albert Field Playing Cards go online

Columbia University: Albert Field Playing Cards go online. “The Columbia University Libraries has digitized cards from nearly two hundred decks of the Albert Field Collection of Playing Cards. The cards date from the 16th century through to 1801, and were mostly European – French, German, English, and Italian, though we slipped in one deck from a very new United States.”

Columbia University: Freedom of Information Archive Receives Two-Year Grant from Arcadia

Columbia University: Freedom of Information Archive Receives Two-Year Grant from Arcadia. “History Lab and Columbia University Libraries are pleased to announce that a new grant of $407,000 from Arcadia, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin. The grant will enable History Lab to partner with Columbia Libraries to continue building the Freedom of Information Archive (FOIA), which is already the world’s largest database of declassified documents.”

New Atlas: FontCode hides letters within letters

New Atlas: FontCode hides letters within letters. “While it’s already possible to relay information via barcodes or QR codes, those codes are entirely visible when included in a document. Using Columbia University’s FontCode system, however, users can hide messages within unrelated text via virtually-invisible changes to the displayed letters.”

Daily Pennsylvanian: Penn Libraries has received grants to digitize major cultural collections

Daily Pennsylvanian: Penn Libraries has received grants to digitize major cultural collections . “Penn Libraries received a grant to preserve Muslim manuscripts and make them more accessible to the students, scholars, and the public. Penn will collaborate with Columbia University and the Free Library of Philadelphia Foundation in the next three years to digitize Arabic, Persian, and Turkish texts through a full-time cataloger.”

Columbia University: Columbia University Libraries Launches Website for the Language and Culture Atlas of Ashkenazic Jewry (LCAAJ)

Columbia University: Columbia University Libraries Launches Website for the Language and Culture Atlas of Ashkenazic Jewry (LCAAJ). “The LCAAJ archive is an extraordinary resource for research in Yiddish studies that can shed much valuable light on language, ethnography, literature, folklore and music, anthropology, linguistics, Germanic and Slavic studies, and aspects of Central and East European history. The archive consists of over 600 interviews conducted between 1959 and 1972 with native speakers of Yiddish during a long-range comparative study to document the effects of physical, linguistic, and cultural channels and barriers on the geographic fragmentation of the Jewish and diverse non-Jewish populations that coexisted in Central and Eastern Europe before World War II. The LCAAJ project collected its interviews at essentially the last moment, when a diverse body of native speakers was still alive, aiming to address both the challenge of an endangered linguistic and cultural legacy, and the special potential that Yiddish provides for studying language and cultural contact and change.”

Columbia University: New Tracker Keeps Tabs on Government Attacks on Science

Columbia University: New Tracker Keeps Tabs on Government Attacks on Science. “The tracker is aimed at documenting government attempts to restrict or prevent scientific research, education, discussion or publication. It currently contains 96 entries drawn from media reports, and links to other resources that complement the database. The tracker organizes attacks into specific categories: government censorship (currently 41 entries); personnel changes (20); budget cuts (15); self-censorship (11); bias and misrepresentation (8); and research hindrance (5). (Some entries are listed under more than one category.) The tracker will be updated on an ongoing basis.” Currently the site only tracks federal-level actions, but state-level actions are for the future.

Columbia: Sabin Center And Grantham Research Institute Launch Database Of Global Climate Change Legislation

Columbia University: Sabin Center And Grantham Research Institute Launch Database Of Global Climate Change Legislation. “To mark the launch, the Grantham Research Institute and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are presenting a new analysis, based on the database, showing a rise in the number of countries that have introduced legislation to support their ‘nationally determined contributions’ (NDCs) to the Paris Climate Change Agreement. The analysis shows that 14 new laws and 33 new executive policies related to climate change have been introduced since the Paris climate change summit in December 2015. 18 of the new laws and policies mainly focus on climate change and 4 specifically relate to NDCs. The new laws add to the over 1,200 climate-related laws that have been enacted globally since 1997, now in 164 countries and including 93 of the top 100 emitters—up from 99 countries in 2015.”

Missionary Research Library Pamphlets: 3,000+ Now Available Online! (Columbia University Libraries)

Columbia University Libraries: Missionary Research Library Pamphlets: 3,000+ Now Available Online!. “Global in scope and including materials from as far back as the 18th century, the Missionary Research Library (MRL), housed at the Burke Library, chronicles world history and the efforts of Protestant missionaries both in the United States and abroad. The MRL contains over 20,000 pamphlets (among other items) and now, thanks to the hard work and dedication of Columbia’s Libraries Preservation and Digital Conversion staff, more than 3,000 have been fully digitized and are freely accessible online!”