‘The Internet’s Best Friend’: How One TikTok Comedian Gets Laughs While Raising Mental Health Awareness (CNET)

CNET: ‘The Internet’s Best Friend’: How One TikTok Comedian Gets Laughs While Raising Mental Health Awareness. “Social media can be a powerful tool for expressing yourself, bringing awareness to social issues and sharing compelling stories that resonate with your audience. Enter Elyse Myers, a comedian who uses platforms like TikTok and Instagram to share stories (like her infamous date where she bought 100 tacos), to make people laugh and to talk about her mental health. In a world of filters that give you bunny ears, there is Myers. She has become a staple of authenticity and honesty that people look to; she’s even lending her expertise to events like a mental health panel at VidCon next month.”

The Herald (Scotland): Who is the Dundee comedian now ‘committing war crimes’ in Ukraine?

The Herald (Scotland): Who is the Dundee comedian now ‘committing war crimes’ in Ukraine?. “GRAHAM Phillips could soon be the first comedian from Dundee to end up in The Hague. He was condemned by MPs in the House of Commons this week for his interview with a British prisoner of war taken captive by the Russians during the Ukraine conflict. In the 45-minute video film, Phillips interrogates Aiden Aslin, who surrendered to Russian forces after fighting in the besieged city of Mariupol last week.”

University of North Carolina: Comedian Lewis Black donates archive to UNC-Chapel Hill University Libraries

University of North Carolina: Comedian Lewis Black donates archive to UNC-Chapel Hill University Libraries. “Black, who has won Grammy Awards for his comedy albums and has written three best-selling books, recently donated his plays, television pilot scripts, and materials from his comedy career to the University Libraries at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. They will be part of the Southern Historical Collection at the Wilson Special Collections Library.”

‘It’s like SNL TikTok’: A peek inside ‘Stapleview,’ a viral live comedy show (Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles Times: ‘It’s like SNL TikTok’: A peek inside ‘Stapleview,’ a viral live comedy show. “With minutes to go before the premiere of the second episode of ‘Stapleview,’ the set of the sketch comedy show is abuzz with the unmistakable energy of a live production barreling rapidly toward showtime. But amid all the commotion — as crew members rush to set up script monitors and hand out last-minute props — the cast has its focus turned elsewhere. The actors are on their phones, using TikTok.”

IssueWire: Three Stooges Author Announces Website Honoring Former Stooge (PRESS RELEASE)

IssueWire: Three Stooges Author Announces Website Honoring Former Stooge (PRESS RELEASE). “The new website features nearly 170 high-definition clips, many rare and never before seen until now, from [Joe] Besser’s nearly 350 memorable movie and TV roles, including as the malevolent brat, Stinky, on The Abbott and Costello Show, as a member of the iconic Three Stooges comedy team, as the frustrated and henpecked building superintendent, Jillson, on The Joey Bishop Show, and so much more.”

The Conversation: How social media forces stand-up comedians like Trevor Noah and Basket Mouth to self-censor

The Conversation: How social media forces stand-up comedians like Trevor Noah and Basket Mouth to self-censor. “As an art form based on abuse and amusement, comedy uses potentially offensive material. One would expect the audience to be either delighted or infuriated. But stand-up comedy creates a space where a kind of agreement is reached, which renders most offensive gags inoffensive. This happens through elements like audiences choosing to attend, the venue and shared socio-cultural knowledge. Stand-up comedy has its own norms about how jokes are made and received. The synergy between comedians and live audiences allows for a momentary suspension of offence. But when these jokes start to circulate in a separate space – like social media – they are subjected to other sets of appraisal and questioning.”

CNET: COVID-19 pushed a lot of entertainers to VR. Now VR events are infiltrating the real world

CNET: COVID-19 pushed a lot of entertainers to VR. Now VR events are infiltrating the real world. “COVID-19 continues to disrupt the entertainment industry, forcing local performers to find alternatives to their standard venues. While many flocked to Zoom, others found VR apps offered a better way to engage with a live audience. And with many cities across the US supporting a return to live events, performers are looking for ways to incorporate these virtual audiences into the real world performances.”

Vice: These Tweets Show Britain’s Classic Camp TV Moments

Vice: These Tweets Show Britain’s Classic Camp TV Moments. “A BBC newsreader sits politely as she adjusts her hair, seemingly unaware the camera is still rolling. Seconds later, EastEnders legend Natalie Cassidy bursts onto the screen, and chaos ensues for a solid two minutes over the face of the oblivious newsreader. This is not the confused end of a coronavirus press briefing, but the start of one of Twitter user Jake McBain’s .avi videos, which he posts routinely on his account to the attention of celebrities including Radio 1 DJ Greg James, Olly Alexander and Drag Race UK’s Divina De Campo.”

CNN: Nigeria’s social media comedians are making laughter pay

CNN: Nigeria’s social media comedians are making laughter pay. “In Nigeria, Africa’s most populous country, an emerging crop of young comics are leveraging social media to create video content that makes people laugh — and makes money. What started as a hobby is now turning into a lucrative business opportunity. By leaning on the growing internet access across the continent, these comics are creating characters and skits on TikTok, Instagram, and Twitter that can be sold to brands.”

New York Times: A Stand-Up Set at the Swipe of a MetroCard

New York Times: A Stand-Up Set at the Swipe of a MetroCard. “For about three months, New York’s comics had been preparing sets to perform Saturday nights on the 1 train. It may not have been the most glamorous of gigs, but as a comic joked last Saturday, at least it was cleaned regularly. The relentless screeching of the subway had a tendency to drown out punch lines, but a few of the comics agreed that wasn’t so different from the hum of activity in a typical club — the clinking of glasses, the waiters whispering, ‘What can I get you?’”

New York Times: Carl Reiner’s Archives Will Go to the National Comedy Center

New York Times: Carl Reiner’s Archives Will Go to the National Comedy Center. “Reiner, who would have turned 99 on Saturday, also left behind a trove of documents, artifacts and personal memorabilia, working on TV programs like ‘Your Show of Shows’ and ‘The Dick Van Dyke Show’ and films like ‘Oh, God!’ and ‘The Jerk.’ Now this personal archive will live on: his family is donating it to the National Comedy Center in Jamestown, N.Y., so that current fans and future generations can appreciate the breadth of his accomplishments.”

BBC: ‘It’s a scary time for stand-up comedians’

BBC: ‘It’s a scary time for stand-up comedians’. “The last real comedy show that stand-up Rob Broderick played to a room full of real people was in mid-March, at Adelaide’s Corona Theatre. ‘Literally the last words I said on a stage were, “Goodnight Corona!”‘ he tells the BBC. ‘Then it was 24 hours in the air, and when I landed most of my work was gone.’”

AZ Central: Need a laugh? Phoenix improv comedy groups are streaming free shows. Here’s how to watch

AZ Central: Need a laugh? Phoenix improv comedy groups are streaming free shows. Here’s how to watch. “Comedians thrive off a crowd’s reactions, and improvisational comedy is nearly impossible without live audience feedback. With COVID-19 closures and safety considerations in recent months, improv groups in metro Phoenix have largely stopped hosting in-person shows. Instead, several have brought their cast members’ talents online so fans can watch from the comfort and safety of their homes.”

Deadline: AI centre stage in weird and wonderful take on Festival Fringe

Deadline: AI centre stage in weird and wonderful take on Festival Fringe. “The researchers instructed the ImprovBot to repetitively mine the 100-word text descriptions of every show from 2011 to 2019, amounting to more than two million words. Online audiences will be allowed to interact with ImprovBot on Twitter that created the new shows based on previous fringe listings from 1pm on Friday, August 7. The bot will use this data to devise the world’s first AI-generated event blurbs for an imagined festival of comedy, plays, musicals, and cabaret.”