New York Times: Comics That Read Top to Bottom Are Bringing in New Readers

New York Times: Comics That Read Top to Bottom Are Bringing in New Readers. “For decades, the fans who powered the comic book industry made weekly pilgrimages to their local comic shops to buy the latest issues about their favorite caped-and-cowled adventurers. These Wednesday Warriors, named for the day new installments typically land on shelves, still do. Voracious readers of printed comics, they skew older — and are mostly male. But now all it takes is a smartphone, as the world of comics is reshaped by the kind of digital disruption that has transformed journalism, music, movies and television.”

Contra Chrome: A Biting Satire of Google’s 2008 Chrome Comic (The New Stack)

The New Stack: Contra Chrome: A Biting Satire of Google’s 2008 Chrome Comic. “For those of us old enough to remember Web 2.0 in its heyday, one of the classic ‘texts’ of that era was the Chrome comic book, which was released in September 2008 at the same time the first version of the Chrome browser was launched. As a tech blogger at the time, I was lucky enough to receive a paper copy of the comic, which I still have on my bookshelf to this day. Well, this week I got a surprise when I discovered a new online ‘remix’ of that comic.”

Manga Out of the Box: the story of a Japanese art form (Google Blog)

Google Blog: Manga Out of the Box: the story of a Japanese art form. “In Manga Out Of The Box – a new collaboration between the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, 12 cultural institutions across Japan, and Google Arts & Culture – we take a closer look at this dynamic art form. Through detailed stories, interactive exhibits and exclusive experiments and videos, you’ll be able to immerse yourself in the world of manga. Here are five things you can do as part of this virtual exhibit.”

The Conversation: Comic book introduces kids to key concepts and careers in cybersecurity

The Conversation: Comic book introduces kids to key concepts and careers in cybersecurity. “Led by a team of educators and researchers, CryptoComics strategically integrates a digital comic book, apps and unplugged activities, such as painting rocks with ancient symbols and making invisible ink. It also features stories about cybersecurity professionals who are women.”

How to Make Comics: Ideas, Activities, and Resources for Learning and Making (Museum of Modern Art)

Museum of Modern Art: How to Make Comics: Ideas, Activities, and Resources for Learning and Making. “Over the course of three articles, writer and comics scholar Chris Gavaler helped us understand what comics are, the potential of the art form, and some of the many approaches to making comics. Still, for many of us, starting with a blank sheet of paper can be daunting—even when we know the basic ideas for filling in the page. To conclude the How to Make Comics series, we wanted to offer a step-by-step approach you can follow in order to transform that blank sheet into a visual story that’s all your own.”

Joplin Globe: Joplin couple buys Supertam, the Route 66 attraction in Carterville

Joplin Globe: Joplin couple buys Supertam, the Route 66 attraction in Carterville. “One of Missouri’s popular Route 66 attractions — a small museum dedicated to Superman but that also sells red, yellow and blue ice cream — will soon be reopened under new ownership. Chris and Andrea Briley, of Joplin, recently purchased Supertam on 66 from Larry and Barbara Tamminen, after the latter couple closed the business on May 8.”

Prospect: How intellectual property laws zapped the comic creatives

Prospect: How intellectual property laws zapped the comic creatives . “To understand the comics industry today—and indeed the derived films, television and video game spin-offs—perhaps requires an understanding of the law more than lore. What can be done with characters and storylines is strictly regulated by an intricate and lucrative system of permissions and licences. This dominance of law is not new; legal issues have dominated from the very beginning of superhero comics in the 1930s, because of the very nature of the creative and commercial process.”

The Verge: Substack is getting into comics

The Verge: Substack is getting into comics. “Substack is trying to put a new spin on webcomics. The newsletter platform announced today that it’s signed a number of comics creators up to use its platform. They’ll email comics out to readers and use Substack’s subscription tools to charge directly for access to their work.”

There’s an official $#@&ing terminology for censoring swears like $#@&: Grawlix (Boing Boing)

Boing Boing: There’s an official $#@&ing terminology for censoring swears like $#@&: Grawlix. “this tweet was the first time I have ever seen a “$&%#@!” word referred to as ‘Grawlix.’ It’s one of those weird linguistic things that I’ve always just accepted, and taken for granted, without considering that someone would have named, identified, and categorized it. According to a 2013 article from Slate, the term ‘grawlix’ was coined by Beetle Bailey creator Mort Walker.”

The Conversation: Kapow! Zap! Splat! How comics make sound on the page

The Conversation: Kapow! Zap! Splat! How comics make sound on the page. “From Wolverine’s SNIKT! when unsheathing his claws, to Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 23 in The Death of Stalin (later made into a film) the use of ‘textual audio’ invites comics readers to hear with their eyes. Fundamental elements such as symbols, font styles and onomatopoeia (where words imitate sounds) mean reading comics is a cross-sensory experience. New and old examples show the endless potential of the artform.”

Arizona State University: ASU alum publishes graphic novel on computer generated images, machine learning

Arizona State University: ASU alum publishes graphic novel on computer generated images, machine learning. “[Jennifer] Weiler, who was influenced by her work at ASU as a student in the School of Arts, Media and Engineering, has been working intensely over the last year to create and publish her first comic book, ‘Creating with Code: A Fun Exploration of Computer-Generated Images and Machine Learning.’ She said she made the comic to educate people about how to effectively utilize coding to construct stylistic computer-generated images and apply methodologies of machine learning in the process.”

Daily Collegian: How Penn State University Press tackled the coronavirus pandemic through comics

Daily Collegian: How Penn State University Press tackled the coronavirus pandemic through comics. “With the term ‘comics,’ one might think of superheroes saving the day or the Sunday strips in the local newspaper. But Penn State University Press has ventured into deeper comic territories with its ‘Graphic Medicine’ series, which covers an array of health topics depicted in comic book form — from what it’s like to suffer from Parkinson’s disease to what being on life support is like. After seeing success with ‘Graphic Medicine,’ the Penn State University Press announced the creation of ‘Graphic Mundi,’ a new imprint that would encompass ‘Graphic Medicine’ along with other heavy subjects, according to a Penn State news release. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, however, the debut of ‘Graphic Mundi’ was pushed back. This hindrance would end up being the inspiration for the imprint’s debut release, ‘COVID Chronicles.’”

The Verge: San Diego Comic-Con, E3, and Anime Expo cancel geek gatherings for the second year in a row

The Verge: San Diego Comic-Con, E3, and Anime Expo cancel geek gatherings for the second year in a row. “San Diego Comic-Con has just announced this year’s show will not go on, at least not in person. For the second time in 50 years — the first was last year — Comic-Con has been canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. There’ll still be a virtual event from July 23rd to the 25th, and organizers are planning a three-day in-person convention tentatively set for November, but they’re clear that the full shebang has been postponed until 2022 — and offering refunds and rollovers as appropriate.”