Bleeding Cool: The Official Roy Thomas Characters, Concepts and Creations Database Launches For 2020

Bleeding Cool: The Official Roy Thomas Characters, Concepts and Creations Database Launches For 2020. “Happy New Year everybody! In celebration of a new decade, my manager and friend John Cimino and I have a special treat for comicbook fans both new and old. What you are about to see is a Herculean labor called The Official Roy Thomas Characters, Concepts and Creations Database.” You can learn more about Roy Thomas here.

The New York Times: ‘The Far Side’ Is Back. Sort Of. Gary Larson Will Explain.

The New York Times: ‘The Far Side’ Is Back. Sort Of. Gary Larson Will Explain.. “Beginning Tuesday, the ‘Far Side’ site will provide visitors with ‘The Daily Dose,’ a random selection of past cartoons, along with a weekly set of strips arranged by theme. There will also be a look at doodles from the sketchbooks of Larson, who said: “I’m looking forward to slipping in some new things every so often.” (Previously, there was no content on the site.)”

Poynter: A graphic guide to the 2020 U.S. census

Poynter: A graphic guide to the 2020 U.S. census. “Carmen Nobel, program director of Journalist’s Resource, inspired us to share this graphic presentation of the upcoming census. She writes, ‘Nonfiction cartoonist Josh Neufeld guides us through several issues to watch for as the 2020 census gets underway — including the risk of undercounts, the potential ramifications of an inaccurate count, the threat of misinformation and disinformation campaigns, and important dates on the census calendar.'” The graphic is available with a CC license and its PDF prints nicely on seven sheets of paper.

BBC: Rise of comic book piracy ‘a real problem’

BBC: Rise of comic book piracy ‘a real problem’. “A comic book writer’s claim that the proliferation of piracy is “a real problem” has encouraged others in the industry to share their concerns. Jim Zub, who writes for Marvel and IDW, tweeted that 20 times as many people read comics illegally shared online, than pay for digital or physical works.”

New York Times: Superhero or Supervillain? Technology’s Role Changes Comic Books

New York Times: Superhero or Supervillain? Technology’s Role Changes Comic Books. “Comic books have been around since the 1930s, each story taking shape as it moves from its writer to its artists (usually a penciler and an inker) and then to its letterer and colorist. Today, that team effort, which also includes an editor reviewing the work and mindful of deadlines, remains largely the same. But while the way writers and editors work is relatively unchanged, computers and technology have broadened the options for illustrators — some of whom have traded pencils and inks for styluses — and revolutionized the roles of letterers and colorists, in speed, output and artistry.”

When MS Paint ruled the fandom world: An innovative webcomic, 10 years later (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: When MS Paint ruled the fandom world: An innovative webcomic, 10 years later. “Homestuck is a product of its time. It’s built on media tropes from when it was written, and its aesthetic evolved with the Internet’s tastes, from jokes about TV shows and adventure games to social media and anime references as the story wrapped up in 2013. But one thing that remained constant and set a tone for how creators would operate online in the years that followed is the tight-knit relationship between Homestuck’s author and his fans.”