New York Times: For Maine Lobstermen, a Perfect Storm Threatens the Summer Season

New York Times: For Maine Lobstermen, a Perfect Storm Threatens the Summer Season. “With the Fourth of July holiday around the corner, Mr. [Mike] Hutchings and his fellow lobstermen were supposed to be gearing up for a major payday as out-of-staters, cruise ships, warmer weather and bounties of lobsters, having just molted their shells and been lured into the thousands of traps anchored on the rocky bottom of Maine’s coastal waters, came together in a seasonal windfall. But like many businesses across the country, the Maine lobster industry, which makes up the bulk of the fishing revenue the state brings in every year, is being battered by the coronavirus, which has crushed the tourism trade that Mr. Hutchings and his fellow fishermen rely on for a living.”

The Verge: Alphabet’s Tidal moonshot tracks individual fish to help sustainably feed humanity

The Verge: Alphabet’s Tidal moonshot tracks individual fish to help sustainably feed humanity. “Today Alphabet is announcing Tidal, an X division moonshot project with the goal of preserving the ocean’s ability to support life and help feed humanity sustainably. Tidal’s initial goal is to develop technologies that will give us a better understanding of what’s happening under water, with a focus on helping fish farmers to run and grow their operations in environmentally friendly ways.”

Panay News: Fisheries library goes digital, thousands of materials freely downloadable

Panay News: Fisheries library goes digital, thousands of materials freely downloadable. “THOUSANDS of fish farmer-friendly materials, journal articles, and books written by scientists and researchers of the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC) are freely searchable and downloadable over the Internet through its digital library.”

On the edge between science and art: Historical biodiversity data from Japanese ‘gyotaku’ (Phys .org)

Phys .org: On the edge between science and art: Historical biodiversity data from Japanese ‘gyotaku’. “Historical biodiversity data is being obtained from museum specimens, literature, classic monographs and old photographs, yet those sources can be damaged, lost or not completely adequate. That brings us to the need of finding additional, even if non-traditional, sources….In Japan many recreational fishers have recorded their memorable catches as ‘gyotaku’, which means fish impression or fish rubbing in English. ‘Gyotaku’ is made directly from the fish specimen and usually includes information such as sampling date and locality, the name of the fisherman, its witnesses, the fish species (frequently its local name), and fishing tackle used.”

Sea Around Us: How Sustainable Is Tuna? New Global Catch Database Exposes Dangerous Fishing Trends

Sea Around Us: How Sustainable Is Tuna? New Global Catch Database Exposes Dangerous Fishing Trends. “Appearing in everything from sushi rolls to sandwiches, tuna are among the world’s favourite fish. But are our current tuna fishing habits sustainable? Probably not, according to a new global database of tuna catches created by researchers at the University of British Columbia and University of Western Australia.”

Scale force: citizen scientists reel in data on salmon and sea trout (The Irish Times)

The Irish Times: Scale force: citizen scientists reel in data on salmon and sea trout. “The Minister of State with responsibility for inland fisheries, Seán Canney, is seeking assistance from anglers to become citizen scientists for the National Salmon Scale Project. The initiative aims to collect information through scales from salmon and sea trout which will contribute to the conservation of wild salmon stocks.”

University of New South Wales: Larval fish database to show effects of climate change on fisheries

University of New South Wales: Larval fish database to show effects of climate change on fisheries. “A new larval fish database collated over the last 30 years will be used to measure marine ecosystem state and change as well as seasonal patterns of various fish species.”

BBC News: The India fishermen using cheap smartphones to map the coast

BBC News: The India fishermen using cheap smartphones to map the coast. “Trapped between rising sea levels and development projects that are eating into the coastline of the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu, fishing communities using cheap technology have taken matters into their own hands, reports Mahima A Jain. More than 40 fishing villages around Chennai (formerly Madras) have created land use maps using open source software and affordable technology. A land use map helps identify which areas of land are used for which purpose.”

Phys .org: Women in Fisheries website launched

Phys .org: Women in Fisheries website launched. “New research exploring women’s roles in fishing families officially gets going this week, as the Women in Fisheries project launches its new website. The study is examining how women contribute to the survival of both fishing families and the fishing industry, and will shed light on women’s roles, identities and wellbeing. Collecting data on both sides of the Atlantic—in Newfoundland, Canada and here in the UK—Women in Fisheries is also hoping to understand how small-scale fishing families (those using boats under 10m in length) are adapting to a changing environmental and economic climate.”

Philippine News Agency: Aquatic news index now available online

Philippine News Agency: Aquatic news index now available online. “A news index on aquatic and marine related news is now available online with the efforts of the library staff of the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center-Aquaculture Department (SEAFDEC-AQD). The Aquatic News Index (ANI), which is being maintained by the SEAFDEC-AQD library, contains aquatic science-related newspaper articles. In an interview Monday, Data Bank Senior Information Assistant Stephen B. Alayon said they will index all publications in newspapers, starting with Business Mirror, Business World, Malaya, Manila Bulletin, Manila Standard, Manila Times, Philippine Daily Inquirer and Philippine Star.”

Google Blog: Close encounters of the fishy kind

Google Blog: Close encounters of the fishy kind. “Much of the ocean is severely overfished with some species teetering on the brink of collapse. By harnessing big data and artificial intelligence, Global Fishing Watch, a platform founded by Google, Skytruth, and Oceana, provided the first near real-time view of large-scale fishing activities around the world. Launched in 2016, it has proven to be a critical tool for fish population management and in protecting critical marine habitats. Today we’re adding two new data layers to increase transparency and awareness around fishing activity, in order to ultimately influence sustainable policies.”

Forbes: The Amazing Ways Google Uses Artificial Intelligence And Satellite Data To Prevent Illegal Fishing

Forbes: The Amazing Ways Google Uses Artificial Intelligence And Satellite Data To Prevent Illegal Fishing. “Using the publicly broadcast Automatic Identification System for shipping, machine learning algorithms have been shown to be able to accurately identify illegal fishing activity in protected areas. This works in much the same way as the ‘cat or horse?’ example for image recogntion I gave above. By plotting a ship’s course and comparing it to patterns of movement where the ship’s purpose is known, computers are able to ‘recognize’ what a ship is doing.”

ISSD: Fisheries Statistics, Ocean Database to Support Marine Resource Management

ISSD: Fisheries Statistics, Ocean Database to Support Marine Resource Management. “The UN Environment Programme (UNEP, or UN Environment) World Conservation Monitoring Centre (WCMC) launched Ocean+Data, an online library of ocean-related data resources meant to inform decision making. In parallel, the Asia-Pacific Commission on Agricultural Statistics launched the Pacific Strategic Plan for Agricultural and Fisheries Statistics (P-SPAFS). Both data collection mechanisms were announced as the UK published a report calling for improved data collection to support a growing ocean economy.”

Mystic Seaport: World’s Most Comprehensive Whaling History Database Released

Mystic Seaport: World’s Most Comprehensive Whaling History Database Released. “Mystic Seaport, in partnership with the New Bedford Whaling Museum, has developed the world’s most comprehensive whaling history database… Researchers, genealogists, students, teachers, and history buffs alike will find it to be the most robust and useful repository of whaling history documentation and scholarship. The data presented combines many sources including logbooks, journals, ship registers, newspapers, business papers, and custom house records. Users will be able to find and trace whaling voyages and ships to specific logbooks, as well as the list of crew members aboard most of the voyages.”