Governor of Rhode Island: RI Seafood Launches New Website Tools and “Fishline” App to Help Local Consumers Find Fresh, Local Seafood

Governor of Rhode Island: RI Seafood Launches New Website Tools and “Fishline” App to Help Local Consumers Find Fresh, Local Seafood. “Developed in partnership with the Commercial Fisheries Center of Rhode Island, the new app, FishLine, lets consumers search for fresh seafood to buy from seafood markets, farmers’ markets, and restaurants, as well as directly off the boat from fishermen.”

WIRED: Swarms of Satellites Are Tracking Illegal Fishing and Logging

WIRED: Swarms of Satellites Are Tracking Illegal Fishing and Logging. “FISHING BOATS KEPT washing up in Japan with dead North Koreans on board. Dozens were documented every year, but they spiked in 2017, with more than 100 boats found on the northern coasts of Japan. No one could explain the appearance of these ghost ships. Why were there so many? An answer arrived in 2020. Using a swarm of satellites orbiting Earth, a nonprofit organization called Global Fishing Watch in Washington, DC, found that China was fishing illegally in North Korean waters.”

The National Fisherman Collection: Penobscot Marine Museum (National Fisherman)

National Fisherman: The National Fisherman Collection: Penobscot Marine Museum. “National Fisherman is the nation’s preeminent publication in the commercial fishing industry, originally a consolidation of earlier, regional fisheries trade papers. In 2012, Diversified Communications of Portland, ME, donated the magazine’s entire pre-digital photographic archive to the Penobscot Marine Museum. After three years of digitally capturing and describing the comprehensive photo archives of National Fisherman magazine, we’ve come to the effective end of the project.”

NOAA: NOAA showcases new mapping tool for marine species

NOAA: NOAA showcases new mapping tool for marine species. “NOAA Fisheries is launching a new tool to better track the location and movement of marine fish in U.S. waters. The Distribution Mapping and Analysis Portal reveals that the ranges of many marine species are shifting, expanding and contracting in response to changing ocean conditions. The interactive website will improve data sharing and collaboration, facilitate decision-making about fishery management and science and increase overall knowledge of species distribution for stock assessments.”

Mystic Seaport Museum: Website Connects People With Their Whaling Ancestors

Mystic Seaport Museum: Website Connects People With Their Whaling Ancestors. “The foundational fabric of Whaling History features three databases that have been stitched together – the American Offshore Whaling Voyage (AOWV) database, the American Offshore Whaling Log database, and an extensive whaling crew list database…. The site has been expanded recently with the addition of 370 new whaling voyages to the AOWV database, most from the 18th century, and the integration of the Dennis Wood Abstracts of Whaling Voyages. The latter are brief handwritten summaries of whaling voyages compiled over more than forty years (1830–1874) by Dennis Wood, a merchant and whaling agent in New Bedford.”

KDLG: Fishermen as scientists? A new app gathers climate observations from fishermen at sea

KDLG: Fishermen as scientists? A new app gathers climate observations from fishermen at sea. “Fishermen have observed changes in ocean ecosystems for years. But, there was no one place to record those observations. This summer, a new mobile app will gather observations from commercial fishermen on the water to bridge the gap between what they see, and what scientists need to know.”

BusinessMirror: Virtual library boosts open access to aquaculture, fisheries publications

BusinessMirror: Virtual library boosts open access to aquaculture, fisheries publications. “The Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center Aquaculture Department (Seafdec/AQD), an international research center located in Tigbauan town in Iloilo province, has given the public unrestricted access to over 1,800 publications, including full-text digitized books, extension manuals, conference proceedings, annual reports, and other materials authored by the organization’s scientists and researchers, Seafdec/AQD said in a news release.” Lots of English-language content here, definitely worth a visit.

ABC News: Pandemic has taken a bite out of seafood trade, consumption

ABC News: Pandemic has taken a bite out of seafood trade, consumption. “The coronavirus pandemic has hurt the U.S. seafood industry due to a precipitous fall in imports and exports and a drop in catch of some species. Those are the findings of a group of scientists who sought to quantify the damage of the pandemic on America’s seafood business, which has also suffered in part because of its reliance on restaurant sales. Consumer demand for seafood at restaurants dropped by more than 70% during the early months of the pandemic, according to the scientists, who published their findings recently in the scientific journal Fish and Fisheries.”

Seafood Source: Gulf of Maine Research Institute launches new aquaculture knowledge portal

Seafood Source: Gulf of Maine Research Institute launches new aquaculture knowledge portal. “The Gulf of Maine Research Institute (GMRI) has announced the launch of a new online portal, ‘The Maine Aquaculturist,’ designed to help aquaculture operations in the U.S. state of Maine access resources in the state. The new portal was created in response to the growing number of aquaculture operations that are either already in business or are planning to establish locations in the state, according to GMRI.”

New York Times: For Maine Lobstermen, a Perfect Storm Threatens the Summer Season

New York Times: For Maine Lobstermen, a Perfect Storm Threatens the Summer Season. “With the Fourth of July holiday around the corner, Mr. [Mike] Hutchings and his fellow lobstermen were supposed to be gearing up for a major payday as out-of-staters, cruise ships, warmer weather and bounties of lobsters, having just molted their shells and been lured into the thousands of traps anchored on the rocky bottom of Maine’s coastal waters, came together in a seasonal windfall. But like many businesses across the country, the Maine lobster industry, which makes up the bulk of the fishing revenue the state brings in every year, is being battered by the coronavirus, which has crushed the tourism trade that Mr. Hutchings and his fellow fishermen rely on for a living.”

The Verge: Alphabet’s Tidal moonshot tracks individual fish to help sustainably feed humanity

The Verge: Alphabet’s Tidal moonshot tracks individual fish to help sustainably feed humanity. “Today Alphabet is announcing Tidal, an X division moonshot project with the goal of preserving the ocean’s ability to support life and help feed humanity sustainably. Tidal’s initial goal is to develop technologies that will give us a better understanding of what’s happening under water, with a focus on helping fish farmers to run and grow their operations in environmentally friendly ways.”

On the edge between science and art: Historical biodiversity data from Japanese ‘gyotaku’ (Phys .org)

Phys .org: On the edge between science and art: Historical biodiversity data from Japanese ‘gyotaku’. “Historical biodiversity data is being obtained from museum specimens, literature, classic monographs and old photographs, yet those sources can be damaged, lost or not completely adequate. That brings us to the need of finding additional, even if non-traditional, sources….In Japan many recreational fishers have recorded their memorable catches as ‘gyotaku’, which means fish impression or fish rubbing in English. ‘Gyotaku’ is made directly from the fish specimen and usually includes information such as sampling date and locality, the name of the fisherman, its witnesses, the fish species (frequently its local name), and fishing tackle used.”

Sea Around Us: How Sustainable Is Tuna? New Global Catch Database Exposes Dangerous Fishing Trends

Sea Around Us: How Sustainable Is Tuna? New Global Catch Database Exposes Dangerous Fishing Trends. “Appearing in everything from sushi rolls to sandwiches, tuna are among the world’s favourite fish. But are our current tuna fishing habits sustainable? Probably not, according to a new global database of tuna catches created by researchers at the University of British Columbia and University of Western Australia.”