Phys .org: Women in Fisheries website launched

Phys .org: Women in Fisheries website launched. “New research exploring women’s roles in fishing families officially gets going this week, as the Women in Fisheries project launches its new website. The study is examining how women contribute to the survival of both fishing families and the fishing industry, and will shed light on women’s roles, identities and wellbeing. Collecting data on both sides of the Atlantic—in Newfoundland, Canada and here in the UK—Women in Fisheries is also hoping to understand how small-scale fishing families (those using boats under 10m in length) are adapting to a changing environmental and economic climate.”

Philippine News Agency: Aquatic news index now available online

Philippine News Agency: Aquatic news index now available online. “A news index on aquatic and marine related news is now available online with the efforts of the library staff of the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center-Aquaculture Department (SEAFDEC-AQD). The Aquatic News Index (ANI), which is being maintained by the SEAFDEC-AQD library, contains aquatic science-related newspaper articles. In an interview Monday, Data Bank Senior Information Assistant Stephen B. Alayon said they will index all publications in newspapers, starting with Business Mirror, Business World, Malaya, Manila Bulletin, Manila Standard, Manila Times, Philippine Daily Inquirer and Philippine Star.”

Google Blog: Close encounters of the fishy kind

Google Blog: Close encounters of the fishy kind. “Much of the ocean is severely overfished with some species teetering on the brink of collapse. By harnessing big data and artificial intelligence, Global Fishing Watch, a platform founded by Google, Skytruth, and Oceana, provided the first near real-time view of large-scale fishing activities around the world. Launched in 2016, it has proven to be a critical tool for fish population management and in protecting critical marine habitats. Today we’re adding two new data layers to increase transparency and awareness around fishing activity, in order to ultimately influence sustainable policies.”

Forbes: The Amazing Ways Google Uses Artificial Intelligence And Satellite Data To Prevent Illegal Fishing

Forbes: The Amazing Ways Google Uses Artificial Intelligence And Satellite Data To Prevent Illegal Fishing. “Using the publicly broadcast Automatic Identification System for shipping, machine learning algorithms have been shown to be able to accurately identify illegal fishing activity in protected areas. This works in much the same way as the ‘cat or horse?’ example for image recogntion I gave above. By plotting a ship’s course and comparing it to patterns of movement where the ship’s purpose is known, computers are able to ‘recognize’ what a ship is doing.”

ISSD: Fisheries Statistics, Ocean Database to Support Marine Resource Management

ISSD: Fisheries Statistics, Ocean Database to Support Marine Resource Management. “The UN Environment Programme (UNEP, or UN Environment) World Conservation Monitoring Centre (WCMC) launched Ocean+Data, an online library of ocean-related data resources meant to inform decision making. In parallel, the Asia-Pacific Commission on Agricultural Statistics launched the Pacific Strategic Plan for Agricultural and Fisheries Statistics (P-SPAFS). Both data collection mechanisms were announced as the UK published a report calling for improved data collection to support a growing ocean economy.”

Mystic Seaport: World’s Most Comprehensive Whaling History Database Released

Mystic Seaport: World’s Most Comprehensive Whaling History Database Released. “Mystic Seaport, in partnership with the New Bedford Whaling Museum, has developed the world’s most comprehensive whaling history database… Researchers, genealogists, students, teachers, and history buffs alike will find it to be the most robust and useful repository of whaling history documentation and scholarship. The data presented combines many sources including logbooks, journals, ship registers, newspapers, business papers, and custom house records. Users will be able to find and trace whaling voyages and ships to specific logbooks, as well as the list of crew members aboard most of the voyages.”

New Hampshire Public Radio: Was Your Seafood Caught With Slave Labor? New Database Helps Retailers Combat Abuse

New Hampshire Public Radio: Was Your Seafood Caught With Slave Labor? New Database Helps Retailers Combat Abuse. “The Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program, known best for its red, yellow and green sustainable seafood-rating scheme, is unveiling its first Seafood Slavery Risk Tool on Thursday. It’s a database designed to help corporate seafood buyers assess the risk of forced labor, human trafficking and hazardous child labor in the seafood they purchase.”