Archinect: How Art and Design Museums Switched to Working From Home and Sharpened Their Digital Experience

Archinect: How Art and Design Museums Switched to Working From Home and Sharpened Their Digital Experience. “With physical exhibitions now inaccessible and museum staff ordered to work from home, we wondered: How has the switch to remote work been going so far for institutions that rely so heavily on personal interaction with visitors? Have online programs, or even virtual exhibitions, been in place before the crisis hit? Can the self-quarantining public access and enjoy collections via the web, potentially offering a vastly expanded, global audience to most museums?”

American Alliance of Museums: How Your Museum Can Use Social Media During COVID-19

American Alliance of Museums: How Your Museum Can Use Social Media During COVID-19. “With the current COVID-19 pandemic deeply affecting museums across the world, many museum professionals at big and small museums alike are wondering how they can still connect and communicate with their audiences, each other, and the broader population. And for many, that answer is social media. Whether you’re a social media manager or just looking for a way to leverage the power of social media for your museum, we’ve gathered examples of how museums are using Twitter, Instagram, Youtube, and other platforms in innovative ways.”

EdSurge: How Librarians Continue Their Work Digitally Even as Coronavirus Closes Libraries

EdSurge: How Librarians Continue Their Work Digitally Even as Coronavirus Closes Libraries. “To get a sense of what the widespread closure of libraries could mean, and hear some creative ways libraries are reaching out digitally, we talked with Jessamyn West, an educational technologist who runs the librarian.net blog and is author of ‘Without a Net: Librarians Bridging the Digital Divide.'” A podcast with a lightly-edited transcript.

Poynter: The WHO and Red Cross rack up big numbers talking coronavirus on TikTok through vastly different strategies

Poynter: The WHO and Red Cross rack up big numbers talking coronavirus on TikTok through vastly different strategies. “In 10 days, the World Health Organization’s new TikTok account put out five videos, racked up roughly 87 million views and accrued over a quarter million followers. It’s part of a larger effort to blanket social media with content aimed at containing the ‘infodemic’ around the new virus that has killed more than 3,800 people around the world. But instead of adopting the platform’s language in full, featuring pop songs, lip-sync or dances, the new account posted trimmed down versions of longer informational videos first featured on WHO’s YouTube page. Is this catching teens’ attention?”

MuseumNext: How to get your museum out of a social media rut

MuseumNext: How to get your museum out of a social media rut. “It’s easy to get caught in social media posting patterns; particularly when a majority of other museums doing the same thing. However, the days of solely posting images of your collection with long flowery captions are over. Here are 8 snappy ideas to mix up your social media strategy to engage new audiences and bring awareness to your museum.”

Route Fifty: Census Advocates Spread the Word on New Online Forms

Route Fifty: Census Advocates Spread the Word on New Online Forms. “With only weeks remaining until the 2020 census count begins, states and cities are scrambling to make sure residents know what to expect when they open their mail in mid-March. From teach-ins in New York City libraries to mailbox-themed ads in Alabama, local officials are trying to spread the message that it’s both important and safe to go online and respond.”

The Verge: The World Health Organization has joined TikTok to fight coronavirus misinformation

The Verge: The World Health Organization has joined TikTok to fight coronavirus misinformation. “The World Health Organization launched a TikTok account on Friday as part of its efforts to cut through coronavirus misinformation online. A specialized public health agency of the United Nations, WHO is one of the leading organizations working to contain the spread of the virus.”

Playbrary: A new vision of the neighborhood library (Brookings Institution)

Brookings Institution: Playbrary: A new vision of the neighborhood library. “As researchers who spearheaded the Playful Learning Landscapes initiative, we are committed to infusing public spaces with playful learning opportunities that naturally enhance children’s cognitive and social development, better equipping them with the skills needed to succeed in a changing world…. The results of this ambitious Play-and-Learn Spaces project—just published in the journal Library & Information Science Research—involved a novel collaboration between designers, community organizations, and researchers who hoped to push the envelope on how the children’s area in library spaces might be more responsive to the needs of families.”

‘Hi Haters’: Why New Jersey’s Twitter Account Is Like No Other (New York Times)

New York Times: ‘Hi Haters’: Why New Jersey’s Twitter Account Is Like No Other. “Over the past two years, Ms. [Megan] Coyne and Ms. [Pearl] Gabel have channeled their innate, deeply felt love for New Jersey into a bold, sassy social media account that has generated considerable attention on Twitter, where celebrities, thirsty brands and influencers compete for clicks. Perhaps more impressively, the two have managed to distill a playfully combative New Jersey swagger into state-centric memes and quips that feel authentic both to the internet and to the Garden State itself.”

Phys .org: The use of jargon kills people’s interest in science, politics

Phys .org: The use of jargon kills people’s interest in science, politics. “In a new study, people exposed to jargon when reading about subjects like self-driving cars and surgical robots later said they were less interested in science than others who read about the same topics, but without the use of specialized terms. They were also less likely to think they were good at science, felt less informed about science and felt less qualified to discuss science topics.”

Penn State News: Citizen scientists may be an untapped resource for water quality improvement

Penn State News: Citizen scientists may be an untapped resource for water quality improvement. “Raising awareness and offering technological tools to the thousands of citizens groups in the U.S. that monitor water quality might help community leaders tap these volunteers as a way to improve access to plentiful, clean water and possibly avoid water-related crises, according to a team of researchers.”

‘We’re nudibranch people’: How enthusiasts help get science done (CNET)

CNET: ‘We’re nudibranch people’: How enthusiasts help get science done. “Citizen science, in which data gathered by enthusiasts helps the work of professionals, has a long history. For example, the Audubon Society has relied on volunteers to help record bird activity every year since 1900 with its annual Christmas Bird Count. Technology has added new dimensions to the idea. Digital cameras and recorders have made it easy to share photos and audio recordings. GPS has added precision to location data. The internet helps people organize groups and exchange data. And smartphones combine all that into one package that fits in your pocket or pack.”

New York Times: Why Random Government Accounts Are All Over Your Timeline

New York Times: Why Random Government Accounts Are All Over Your Timeline. “Earlier this month… the San Antonio Water System, which regulates the water utilities for the Texas city, tweeted a joke about Baby Yoda reaching to flush the toilet. In October, the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer fired off a tweet about clogging a friend’s toilet using an image of the widely memed Cleveland Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield. The Department of Transportation in Northern Virginia used a GIF of a confused German shepherd to ask drivers to refrain from speeding.”

New York Times: Doctors on TikTok Try to Go Viral

New York Times: Doctors on TikTok Try to Go Viral. “On TikTok, sex ed is being flipped on its head. Teenagers who load the app might find guidance set to the pulsing beat of ‘Sex Talk’ by Megan Thee Stallion. A doctor, sporting scrubs and grinning into her camera, instructs them on how to respond if a condom breaks during sex: The pill Plan B can be 95 percent effective, the video explains.”

How theme park technologies have helped museums: a case study of the new St. Louis Aquarium (Web Informant)

Web Informant: How theme park technologies have helped museums: a case study of the new St. Louis Aquarium. “I am a big patron of museums. I go to many of them and try to fit in a visit whenever I am out of town. But what I have seen lately is how they have begun to use the same technologies that entertainment companies have been perfecting for movies and theme park rides, all in the interest of capturing more visitors and increasing visitor engagement. I think this a positive development, and this blog explains its evolution and why it is welcomed.”